81

It's a BAD idea! The oil is contaminated with impurities that will not do the fueling system on your car any favors. Further, it's bad for the environment because your car is NOT designed to burn oil even if it's mixed with gasoline. The best thing to do is to take the used oil to a place where it can be recycled into new oil and used again. Most oil ...


29

The main concern with using petrol in diesel systems is that diesel is used to lubricate the fuel pump, which petrol cannot perform adequately, which will shorten the useful life of the fuel system. I think it's fair to assume that in the 5-6 seconds the fuel bowser was able to deliver no more than 2 L of petrol. 2 L out of 60 L is around 3%. I wouldn't ...


28

I'd suggest there's credence for all of these Your fuel pump overheating if it runs dry Unbeknownst to most, the fuel in the tank cools the fuel pump in most vehicles. The pump sits in a bath of fuel for just this reason. Seems counter intuitive you'd stick an electrical device into something as flammable as gasoline, but it works just fine because ...


22

If you think about what the car is doing in both cases you'll see why you burn more fuel when accelerating. General theory F = mA (Force is equal to mass times acceleration), and in this case the force is applied by the engine. The more force, the more fuel is burned. Acceleration In stop and go traffic, you are making frequent stops, and accelerating ...


18

No. Vehicle weight is only one factor of fuel economy. The most important factor is air resistance. Vehicle weight comes as the second most important factor. My ~1700 kg (car + driver) Toyota RAV4 hybrid has 56 litre fuel tank. Gasoline has a density of 0.735 kg/litre. This is 41 kg of fuel. If you reduce it by half, you save about 20 kg, or a bit over 1% ...


16

Every time you brake, the energy is wasted. Brakes convert mechanical energy of a moving car into heat via friction (they heat up). This is where the energy is ultimately "lost". Then, when the traffic moves forward a bit, you of course need to accelerate - and this is where you actually use gas from your tank to put this energy into getting your car to move....


16

The main problems from misfueling a diesel car with petrol stem from the fact that (as Zaid points out) petrol doesn't provide the lubrication effect of diesel fuel and as a solvent it can actually inhibit the diesel that is there from providing lubrication and this can do nasty, nasty things to the fuel pump which can then have knock-on effects to other ...


12

It's a gasoline vent tube, serving three purposes. Gasoline vapors can be especially dangerous under pressure (pretty much why it is useful), and as the temperature fluctuates it is safer to relieve the vapor pressure than it is to potentially have it build up. The gasoline vapors should preferably not be ejected onto a potential spark source (battery) or ...


12

Regulations limit the amount of unburnt hydrocarbons that can be released into the atmosphere, therefore fuel tanks on cars now have to be sealed to stop these emissions. The noise you hear is air rushing into the fuel tank, due to the low pressure caused by the use of fuel.


12

If there is under a gallon of stale gas and you filled your tank up with fresh, I don't think there'd be an issue with the stale gas. It would dilute enough you shouldn't have to worry about it. If you can't drop (or don't want to) your fuel tank, or cannot put a syphon hose down into it through the filler neck, there's just about no way to get the small ...


12

All modern cars scavenge blow-by including oil vapour and a mist of droplets. This is good for upper cylinder lubrication and does extend ring and bore life. If you have to, you can install a catch can to condense steam and larger sludgy solids. Older cars just vented through a wire wool cap on a rocker cover. Used oil is another matter. There is going ...


12

Aside from the numerous reasons not to do this to your car I would like to offer you a solution to your perceived problem. Don't take the old oil back to the store. At least not right away... Your new oil was purchased in single quarts or a 5-quart jug, right? Put your old oil in the empty containers and recycle it at your convenience. This could be the ...


10

Despite any opinions of safety it seems that gas tanks are manufactured to not accept more than 95% of their total volume because of regulations. Here is a quote from the US Department of Transportation Federal Motor Carry Safety Administration Regulation 393.67 Subpart E. (12) Overfill restriction. A liquid fuel tank manufactured on or after January 1, ...


9

The gas gauge is just an indicator and each vehicle is going to be different. I know the older Datsun Z cars had two gas gauges, one was the main one which showed the volume of gas down to 1/4 tank, while the secondary one showed from 1/4 down to empty. The secondary gas gauge was very accurate to give the driver a true indication of how much fuel was in the ...


9

Here is a link from the API (American Petroleum Institute) website. http://www.api.org/oil-and-natural-gas/consumer-information/consumer-resources/staying-safe-pump The article is called Staying safe at the pump. It talks a lot about static discharge among other things as sources of ignition. In most jurisdictions it is illegal to have an engine running ...


9

It is not likely the quality of the gasoline causing the change. The sensors are unable to evaluate the chemical makeup of the fuel. It could be a change in your driving habits, changes in temperature, the vehicle health, tire pressure, etc. I would not be too concerned. The dash indicator is an estimate only. The computer monitors how you drive, current ...


8

You will likely be annoyingly loud but otherwise fine. As always, you are liable for your own compliance with local noise ordinances. I would recommend that you drive with the windows up until you give the car to the shop in order to avoid any risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. For example, don't drive with the trunk propped open: the low pressure behind ...


8

Interesting issue IF, the internal tubes have corroded within the tank that would be relatively serious. The interesting piece is, how would they corrode. As far as I know, almost ALL the fuel tanks on modern bikes use copper for this overflow. It runs from the lip above the filler point, down through the tank to a nipple on the underside of the tank (or ...


8

Your engine is always burning gas when the car is running. When you're stationary, you are burning gas to keep your engine running, without actually moving the car, so you're actual miles per gallon (MPG) at that moment is 0. When you begin to accelerate, you are using more gas than when the car was idling, but then you have to press the brakes, ...


8

It sounds like you have a motorcycle with a carburetor with gravity fed fuel line. (i.e. Without a fuel pump of any sort). In those conditions I can see that there is a higher fuel pressure at the inlet to the carburetor when the fuel tank is full. It's possible that when the tank is low the pressure is barely enough to meet fuel demand. With that said, ...


7

He is correct! The actual pump is inside a canister and unless the tank is bone dry, the pump is ALWAYS submersed in fuel ( even when cornering hard). if this was not the case, the vehicle would stutter and hiccup due to air in the line. Anyone who has ever had this happen, knows it does this only when you completely run out of gas. Just look at the design ...


7

Yes, running low on fuel can damage your fuel pump, but as IHaveNoIdeaWhatImDoing mentioned in the comments below, modern fuel tanks are sophisticated enough to prevent fuel pump starvation until the tank is almost complete empty. Either way, damage to the pump can occur because fuel acts as a coolant for the electric motor. When there is no more fuel the ...


6

To add a little bit to Paulster2's answer the upper and lower Explosive Limits of Gasoline is 7.6% and 1.4% respectively. This means that a concentration outside of those limits will either be to rich or lean to burn. And since Gasoline's Flash point is -45 °F (-43 °C) it's pretty much always putting off vapors, which would push any air out of the tank. It's ...


6

That pipe probably goes to the tank too, it is just there to let air out of the tank while adding fuel down the main pipe. I believe that your additive will be in the fuel.


6

It doesn't really matter if there's gas left in the hose. The only way for all gas to flow out of the hose is for the hose to collapse or air to enter it. It's metered at the pump side but it doesn't matter, because flow out of hose = flow into hose. Also remember that it's pressurized from the pump side (it's actually pressurized from a pump in the ...


6

This could be a bad vent valve or a blocked vent hose located near the vapor canister under the vehicle. As this article states, A clogged up vent valve can cause trouble filling the gas tank. Another Pilot owner posted at Car Gurus that "when I try and put gas in, the pump keeps stopping as if the tank is full". His resolution was a blocked vent.


6

Given what you've said, I'm assuming the rust is in the form of small, dry flakes and dirt. Is the tank fully dry, or is there still some fuel or other liquid in there? If it's dry, you might be able to do something by removing the filler neck and inserting a vacuum hose to suck the loose debris out? Looking at photos on the internet, it looks like there's ...


5

I worked at a shop that repaired fuel tanks and this is what we did. No cutting corners, each step depends on the last. The shop had a fancy caustic soda tub and some of the techs would call that an acid bath, but we used this on very few tanks. Mostly small, well constructed, steel motorcycle tanks. This is what we did for the other tanks that were not ...


5

Carry the fuel in an approved container, some local laws require color coded tanks for gasoline, diesel, alcohol etc. If you must carry fuel in the interior of the vehicle use common sense. Don't smoke, and open the windows to avoid a build up of fumes/vapors. If you are using the fuel to power a lawnmower, generator, etc carry as little as possible for the ...


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