11

Background You asked Why is the effect of a bad fuel pump more noticeable at higher speeds? I assume that by 'higher speeds' you mean engine speeds or RPM's. During high RPM operation an ICE consumes more fuel so the flow rate into the fuel injection system or carburetor increases at higher RPM's. This taxes the fuel system and puts more load on the ...


8

It appears there are two pumps which it could actually be. One each for the left and right sides of the vehicle. The part numbers I can find are: Right side: Spectra Premium - SP7050M Bosch - 67774 Left side: Mopar - RL161808AE Spectra Premium - SP7051M These are for the SRT8 6.1L Hemi. These models are for exact fit with housing. You can get a cheaper ...


7

He is correct! The actual pump is inside a canister and unless the tank is bone dry, the pump is ALWAYS submersed in fuel ( even when cornering hard). if this was not the case, the vehicle would stutter and hiccup due to air in the line. Anyone who has ever had this happen, knows it does this only when you completely run out of gas. Just look at the design ...


7

Yes, running low on fuel can damage your fuel pump, but as IHaveNoIdeaWhatImDoing mentioned in the comments below, modern fuel tanks are sophisticated enough to prevent fuel pump starvation until the tank is almost complete empty. Either way, damage to the pump can occur because fuel acts as a coolant for the electric motor. When there is no more fuel the ...


6

Voltage drop the ground side pin 4 with the car running. I'd suspect a poor ground is the cause. You can also scope the power side by removing the fuse and putting a wire loop in place. Connect a low amp probe. Since the fuse is rated @ 20A you should expect to see 8-10A if it's drawing more amps than that suspect a short to ground or a bad ground or ...


6

I definitely agree with Zaid's answer. The stock fuel pumps should work just fine to start and run your car, because all other dodge chargers are still running on the road with the stock fuel pumps. Check these. fuel pressure on the top of the engine ( fuel rail), usually the fuel rail will have a plug to connect your pressure sensor ( which you can get it ...


6

Your basic premise is flawed. Moving left and right on the graph correlates to different flow rates if everything is kept the same while the pressure is changed. The change in power comes from the change in RPM and is unintentional. In a vehicle there is generally only one system voltage available. Further fuel pumps are generally run directly from straight ...


6

It's a demand vs supply deal The fuel pumps found in most OEM fuel delivery setups today are driven by an electric motor that is running at a fixed speed. This effectively fixes the flow rate provided by the fuel pump. The majority of fuel-delivery systems found in fuel-injected vehicles are return-style. What this means is that the fuel injectors will ...


6

Any bodge involving using gravity to feed the petrol to the engine isn't going to work - it's a multipoint electronic injection system running at much higher pressures then gravity would produce. You might succeed in doing more damage but that's about it. Also any mucking around with the fuel system is just going to give the garage a reason to renege on ...


5

If the vehicle has GDI (Gasoline direct injection) then yes there will be a low pressure or lift pump and a high pressure pump. One run on 12 volt the other run by the engine. I don't think your vehicle is equipped with GDI but I am not sure. I am not aware of any gasoline production vehicles other than GDI that come equipped with more than one fuel pump.


5

You won't be able to disconnect the fuel line and pour fuel into the fuel rail because this won't achieve the 60psi of fuel pressure that most non-direct injection fuel injected cars run at. You also have no way to switch off the fuel flow when switching to LPG and there is a chance that the LPG system may not switch in because it's electronics believe ...


4

Sounds strange. I can understand that the absence of a crank position sensor signal can prevent the engine from starting (the ECU won't allow the car to run without it). The lack of signal could also prevent the fuel pump relay from activating and priming the fuel lines. But I'm struggling to buy that a bad crank position sensor would result in physical ...


4

Let's start with some pictures to try and clear up the function of the fuel system. Both images and a lot of the information comes from here: http://www.aa1car.com/library/returnless_efi.htm There are two main types of Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) systems. The return type, and the returnless type. In the return type, excess fuel is pumped to the fuel ...


4

Dirt in the tank could definitely be the cause of the burned pin because the burned pin suggests that the pump was drawing a larger than normal current from that wire. The pump having to contend with dirt in the tank could mean it was having to work significantly harder than when pumping clean fuel which would be a very good reason for it to draw excessive ...


4

It is because the fuel lubricates and cools the pump. If you leave the tank run dry, the fuel pump will turn dry, which will overheat it and may cause the electric motor to fail or otherwise to reduce its service life. The same principle applies to the water pump when it is electrically driven, like in the Toyota Prius. When burping those kind of systems, ...


4

Sorry for the long wait fellas, but after banging my head for a few days, I finally figured out what was the issue. It wasn't injector problem nor the fuel pump. It turned out to be a BMW clamp that got loose and pressure popped off the hose it held down inside the gas tank. Look at photo:


4

It's perfectly fine if you leave the cover as is with slightly imperfect sealing. Even if some water would get to it again (which is not an ordinary event itself) the only bad thing it could potentially do is falling through the seal and getting into the fuel pump electrical connection causing it to rust over time. But this scenario is highly unlikely. There'...


4

If it was sealed when you opened it up you should seal it when you close it. Automotive manufacturers don't ad unnecessary steps or materials to their car building processes, so I'd trust their judgment. You want to clean the old sealant off of the cover and rim, then apply a bead of fuel resistant automotive silicone sealant like Hylomar Blue or Loctite ...


3

So, after the edits to the original question, the tenor of the question changed, and a new key piece of information has emerged. Spraying starter fluid into the throttle body gets the engine to turn over. So, clearly you have a fuel issue. It's an Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) system, and I suspect it's a non-return EFI system. So for the fuel to get from ...


3

Preamble (Because it's important) Let's talk about fuel pumps The fuel pumps found in most OEM fuel delivery setups today are driven by an electric motor that is running at a fixed speed. This effectively fixes the flow rate and discharge pressure provided by the fuel pump. The flow rate and pressure deviate over time due to several reasons which include:...


3

Aftermarket fuel pumps generally can flow more or tolerate higher pressures depending upon the design of the pump and the flaws in the pump it is replacing. They're intended for aftermarket applications which require higher fuel pressures and flows than stock. The only way to tell how it differs from the stock unit is to find the specs of the stock unit and ...


3

A fuel pump is designed to provide 3 to 4 times the needed maximum volume of fuel to the engine. The excess fuel is then returned back to the tank through the pressure regulator and return line. When the fuel pressure is low it is very obvious that something in the fuel system is having a problem. It could be a bad fuel pressure regulator, plugged fuel ...


3

Realistically I'd redo your test using a little more accurate of a timing sequence. Two things to really make it more accurate: Use some sort of stopwatch (apps for cell phones are free). Doing so will ensure you are getting the time you are looking towards. Right now you are guessing you are using the exact same time. Human nature tells me we cannot get ...


2

It doesn't matter how low your fuel level is, the fuel pump will always be submerged in fuel, the pump actually sits inside a well that is full of fuel, its like this on every car that has an internally mounted pump, otherwise the mass would be exposed to oxygen and a spark can ignite the tank vapors and boom. --- former UTI graduate.


2

Your issues may be beyond the fuel pump. The telling sign of this is that a change in engine load is inducing a change in the noise of the fuel pump. I assume that your fuel supply system is a "return"-style fuel system in which the fuel flow provided by the pump is constant, regardless of load; the pressure regulator determines how much fuel is recycled ...


2

It sounds very much like your alternator is not delivering a constant voltage. It should be able to cope with a change in demand. Check the voltage at the battery with different loads turned on, the alternator should be able to keep a voltage of around 14v Alternatively you could have a slightly bad connection from the battery to the fuse box, or the ...


2

Performance pumps typically have the ability to flow more fuel while maintaining the same pressure since the fuel regulator is what determines this. I highly recommend NOT using a performance fuel pump unless the extra fuel is needed for changes made to increase power. Otherwise the fuel flows around the system faster than it normally would, running into ...


2

Another reason for burnt connectors could be from cargo or passengers sitting in the back seat on the driver's side. The weight on the seat cracks the plastic fuel pump cover and wiggles the connector causing the pins to heat up. If left too long, the pins will melt the plastic around them causing gas to leak through the connector. This happened to me ...


2

The power in the in pins 1 and 3 proves that fuse 19 is OK and that the PCM will turn on PGMFI relay #1 and further that said relay will supply power to the fuel pump relay (PGMFI relay #2). It does not prove that the relay is good. My next tests would be apply power to Pin #2 and see if the fuel pump activates. If not repair the pump. If the pump works ...


2

I agree with Arturs answer about high fuel pressure but I suspect a different root cause for the high pressure. In your car there is a fuel pressure sending unit. This little box is attached to the fuel line and monitors fuel pressure. It send a message to another device that controls the fuel pump. This second device a Fuel Pump Driver Module (FPDM) uses ...


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