57

X-Y problem time, I think. How do you know it's a rat? Your comment on the question says that it looked "chewed and not cut with a tool". This is precisely what wear looks like, and this is backed up by you saying it's happening in the same place each time, and it's always the same pipe and never anything else. A lack of dead rats in traps makes this ...


40

You could cover the pipe with some protective braiding like this - https://hoseflex.com/product/stainless-steel-braid/


23

Here in Arizona where wood rats (a.k.a. pack rats) are a major pest, a common solution is to put lights under the vehicle and/or inside the engine compartment. You can put a cheap shop light on an extension cord and stick it under the car when it's parked. The rats no longer feel safe in the brightly lit space.


21

I joined this community just to answer this question. While there are already some good answers here, one proven solution that is highly effective is to mix crushed hot pepper with paint. Apply it to the hose, cable, etc. and let it dry. Next time that the rodent gnaws on the painted fuel line hose, the little varmint gets an unforgettable hot mouth and ...


10

On a car with fuel injection there can be two fuel pumps, one high-pressure and one low-pressure. The low-pressure pump moves the gas from the tank up to the high pressure pump. The high pressure pump then raises the pressure to a level that will be useful to the injectors. The two PIDs reflect those two different systems. PID Description Min ...


9

I recommend to everyone I know to run your generator or other small equipment dry before storage. The main purpose of this is to get all of the ethanol based fuel out of carburetor and fuel bowl. Ethanol has a propensity of gumming things up and can leave a lot of varnish over time. This tends to plug orifices needed for proper fuel metering while running, ...


9

To be honest, if part of the fuel line is rotten, I'd be tempted to replace the whole line - chances are the rest isn't far behind... Modern rubber hoses should last a decent amount of time, they're made of better rubber than they used to be, and are reinforced to take the extra pressure of modern injection systems.


7

I'll preface this with the caveat that I haven't replaced the fuel filter on this specific vehicle before, and my advice is based on experience with other cars. I do think it's good advice regardless. I agree that you should not crimp the lines, but I strongly disagree that you should just disconnect it without depressurizing the lines. Remove the fuse for ...


6

Those are metric screw dimensions. M10 means a 10 millimeter outer diameter for the bolt or whatever piece it is; M12 means 12 millimeters. The part after the 'x' is the pitch -- how many mm a thread is wide. To figure out which you have, you can measure the existing part with calipers and a thread gauge. You might also try calling your local VW dealer with ...


6

I've had to deal with rotten fuel lines on my '94 Nissan. Took me a year to find a suitable solution. Like you, I was considering steel lines to replace the entire thing, but the steel lines I found were shorter than what I needed, so I needed to splice several lengths together. The issue I had was how to splice them together. The sections I could buy didn'...


5

Hyundai/Kia are known for having issues with their EVAP control systems. I owned a 2007 Hyundai Tiburon and the EVAP solenoid was malfunctioning. It made a pretty strong fuel smell because of the leak it caused. Cold weather can cause some of the rubber hose and emissions tubing to harden and crack under stress. Another thing to keep in mind is that when ...


5

I fixed a 1998 Ford Contour that wouldn't start after sitting for a while in cold weather. The problem was a corroded ground connector in the wiring at the fuel pump. A couple years later, it was left sitting again, and sure enough, it wouldn't start. Same problem, same fix. It can happen, though I'm not sure I would have believed it if I hadn't seen it ...


5

I also joined this community just to respond. In my part of the world we have this a lot. Fuel lines and other similar tubes and cables are often damaged. It is because martens are attracted to the smell of certain types of tubing, because fishmeal is added to these plastics and rubbers. You can try things like parking on chicken wire and hanging toilet ...


4

If the bubbles are in the fuel line that leads to the high pressure pump, then air in the system would reduce the pumps ability to pressurise the fuel correctly. Diesel injectors require high pressure fuel in order to achieve proper atomisation; liquids don't burn, so the fuel needs to enter the cylinder in very fine droplets in order for a clean burn to ...


4

By the time you need a fuel filter change it is time to replace the hoses also. Simply cut the hose off the fuel line and replace it using new clamps. When you get you filter ask the person at the counter for a foot of high pressure fuel hose. There was a time when they actually included the hose section and clamps in the box with the filter.


4

My theory is you have a stuck float in your carburetor. This is causing the fuel bowl not to fill completely. When you go around the corner, the main jets are without fuel (sucking air) and this kills engine power. Getting the carb rebuilt (or at least looked at) will probably solve the issue. You may also try using a plastic handled screwdriver and using ...


4

"Why can't people just upgrade fuel pumps and increase fuel line (pipe?) pressures to force fuel to flow in to the engine when the intake valves are open instead?" This is the job of the fuel injector/ECU. It is timed specifically so the proper amount of fuel is injected at the correct time. The ECU is tuned for a specific fuel pressure and can typically ...


4

No. It will not evaporate by much at all. I would say it would be nearly unnoticeable. If you are concerned stuff a decently fitting clean bolt in the lines or something to plug it up like a rubber cork. This will prevent spillage from fuel that is in the lines. Not to mention the fuel would probably need to get through some filters and pumps too. The fuel ...


3

In multi port fuel injection the injectors are located near the Intake valve. In central port fuel injection there is a single injector with multiple valves that route to their respective cylinders. Think the 90's Chevy Blazer with the 4.3l Vortec. There is also throttle body fuel injection in which a single injector is located at the throttle plate. As ...


3

Do not crimp the fuel line. As long as you put a rag under the filter, you won't even notice the spray. While the rail may be held at a fairly high pressure, the line is small, so there isn't much fuel in there to escape. On top of that, the fuel line will depressurize into the bottom of the filter and drip down, so you won't have to worry about fuel ...


3

(Too late to help the OP, but for future searchers:) Aero people use United-Erie "EZ Turn Fuel Lube" (SAE or Mil Spec "G-6032D"). It isn't officially a sealant, so the clamps are still doing the work. But it is fuel resistant, thus forms a non-hardening layer between the metal and rubber parts, and you won't have to rip or distort the hoses from cranking ...


3

You have not said how much of a reduction, so this is just some basic theory. Fuel level gauges are for reference. They are not precise measuring devices. That being said, while your scooter is moving, the fuel is sloshing around the tank making the fuel level float rise and fall. The gauge will only read what is an estimate of what it thinks is in the ...


2

1997 Ford Escort wagon, my found issue. Ethanol caused rubber fuel hose to metal tube failures. Hose would swell in hot weather, or when engine heat concentrated enough to swell hose inward. Fuel pressure dropped so bad it would not start. replaced hose, never another issue.


2

The 97 Mercury Tracer doesn't use a Fuel Rail Pressure sensor and any reading you're getting from your OBD2 application is false. If you believe that the fuel pressure is low, hook up a fuel pressure gauge and verify before replacing anything. Refer to Brian Knoblauch's answer for potential causes.


2

Two questions, since you checked your spark plugs for spark... Can you get to your fuel rail on top of your head? If so, can you disconnected? I ask, because the "poor man's" way of checking the fuel pump is to disconnect the fuel rail and see fuel coming as soon as you turn the ignition to the accessory position. Listening for the pump can be difficult ...


2

There isn't any kind of application you can apply to the hose to make it easier to take off at a later time. The reasoning is it would be too easy for the hose to slip off during normal operation. And by the time you replace the fuel filter again it wouldn't even be there anymore as it's not a regular maintenance object. Just doing what you did (Twisting ...


2

On a four cycle (four stroke) engine with sequential port fuel injection, the fuel injectors fire at 1/2 the rate of the RPM (ie: 3000 rpm engine speed equates to 1500 injector pulses per minute), which just happens to be the same speed at which the spark plug for a single cylinder fires. Four factors allow the injector to operate at this speed. The first ...


2

The second page you provided says: NiCopp® has been used on hydraulic/fluid transfer systems on vehicles where steel lines and tubing are commonly used. This includes brake, fuel and transmission systems. There should be absolutely no issue using the NiCopp lines for fuel. As for compression fittings, remember that the flared fittings shown on the ...


2

Sometimes A float gets "waterlogged" (so saturated with fuel that it just won't float anymore.) The float could be bent in position. Worn tip on float needle Worn o-ring in the float seat Excess dirt and varnish in the carburetor. (Varnish deposits occur when fuel sits too long..) The best thing to do is remove and examine the carburetor. Take it ...


2

Your carb is plugged, probably due to ethanol gas. It is heck on these small engines. The easiest way to fix this is to replace the carb. The crud from the ethanol gets into the very small orifices and clogs them up. There is enough of a draw from the vacuum created under full choke for it to draw gas and keep it running, but once you take the choke off, the ...


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