13

Just replace it. You're talking about a car from 1997. If you don't know when the fuel filter was replaced, I'm inclined to believe that it hasn't ever been changed. Very quick Googling shows me that a 323 fuel filter from that timeframe costs less than $20 USD. If you really wanted to assure yourself that it's a problematic filter, you could ...


9

While disconnecting the fuel pump relay and running the engine will work, there are other alternatives. If you can access the Schräder valve, depress it to release the pressurized fuel before disconnecting the fuel lines. This will have the effect of reducing fuel line pressure. It helps to have the vehicle cool down and not running for a few hours. I don'...


7

I'll preface this with the caveat that I haven't replaced the fuel filter on this specific vehicle before, and my advice is based on experience with other cars. I do think it's good advice regardless. I agree that you should not crimp the lines, but I strongly disagree that you should just disconnect it without depressurizing the lines. Remove the fuse for ...


7

First thing you need to get some type of penetrating oil. You need something like LiquidWrench,PB Blaster or SeaFoam. My personal favorite is PB Blaster. The second thing you need is patience. If you can, give the penetrant several days to work. I have had goodluck wrapping the fitting in a strip of rag and soaking it with the oil. If you can get the quick ...


6

tl dr: I don't see how they can make that specific claim. I'm not sure how they can claim it increases fuel flow. What it can do is allow more fuel to flow by reducing a restriction in the fuel system. I realize there may be a fine line here between the two lines of thought. The claim it "increases" to me means it does something which actively puts more ...


6

You are correct in how to do this. I was just watching an episode of "Tech Garage" and they were talking about this very topic. Their suggested methodology was to pull the fuel pump fuse, and run the engine till it stopped on it's own. You can now change out the fuel filter. You will still get some fuel out of the line, but nothing like having 30-60 psi of ...


5

How would you get any benefit from the increased fuel flow? The fuel that actually goes into the engine is precisely metered by injectors to have a precise air-fuel ratio, and the whole system including the fuel filter, fuel pump and injectors is sized so that the limiting factor is the air going into the engine and the desired air-fuel ratio. If you have ...


4

The fuel filter on your vehicle is part of its fuel pump in the fuel tank. They are designed and made to last the 'life of the vehicle'. They have a plastic OBD2 fuel tank with an interior 'bladder', which means unless something other then normal operation causes damage they never have to be changed.


4

The black powder was charcoal from the evaporative fuel filter/canister. This filters evaporated fuel from your fuel tank. When your fuel tank gets warmer and the gasses expand above the fuel line they pass through this canister and are filtered out by the charcoal. When the temperature drops a reed valve opens due to the pressure change in other ...


4

The DPF or Diesel Particulate Filter is part of the exhaust system the Turbocharger pulls it's power from the exhaust system so it in conceivable that a blocked DPF filter could stall the turbocharger causing damage. Also, a failed turbocharger could dump lots of oil into the DPF which would be equally damaging. We have a 2012 1.6 TDI Bluemotion Golf and ...


4

The issue of dirty fuel has been greatly mitigated by modern pollution control regulations. Twenty or thirty years ago a lot of underground storage tanks were steel. The steel was prone to rust. The rust would be caused by the water that would settle to the bottom of the tank. The water would be introduced into the tank from the ambient air that goes into ...


4

I would have to say that it probably isn't worth the effort to pre-filter the fuel. In general, if you're buying fuel with noticeable water in it, then get your fuel somewhere else. The existing fuel filter (providing you're using a good quality one and not a $2 one) should be plenty sufficient to filter small particles etc. The hassle involved in buying ...


4

Yes, you can relatively easily determine if your fuel filter is clogged. The XJ600 has a vacuum operated fuel pump below the downdraft carb bank. This is what it looks like. The stock fuel filter is an inline filter and this is what it looks like. As I'm sure you have noticed, the filter is a bit opaque and you can see if it is clogged. It's very easy ...


4

I don't have a reference for you, but would suggest the filter should be just fine. As long as it's been stored in a dry location and is unused, there's nothing which is going to foul it. An easy test for it would be to see if you can blow through it. As long as you can push air through it easily, it should be good. Another thing to check is to rattle it to ...


3

This will all depend on the type of fuel pump that your vehicle uses. The stronger the pump, the larger the pressure difference it can manage. If you wanted to calculate a theoretical limit, I guess you could estimate it by calculating the fluid power based on the flow rate your engine requires and the pressure upstream of the fuel filter: Power = Pressure *...


3

I have no experience with your model, but sometimes they are located on the petcock, inside the tank. Edit: I cannot find old diagrams, but at least ZZR600's some years younger than yours seem to have had those. Oldest diagram I could find at the moment: http://www.motosport.com/SE/motorcycle/oem-parts/KAWASAKI/2003/ZZR600/FUEL-TANK


3

The DPF is basically a catalytic converter for a diesel engine. I wouldn't say it's necessary that both of these things fail at the same time, but it's possible. I will assume you do lots of short trips rather than regular long trips? At any rate, the DPF needs to periodically heat up and stay hot for a long period to burn off excess deposits. A nice long ...


3

Do not crimp the fuel line. As long as you put a rag under the filter, you won't even notice the spray. While the rail may be held at a fairly high pressure, the line is small, so there isn't much fuel in there to escape. On top of that, the fuel line will depressurize into the bottom of the filter and drip down, so you won't have to worry about fuel ...


2

If it's never been changed, then yes, I'd change it. To get 100k out of a fuel filter is a good life for it. Fuel filters are usually not too expensive, so are a decent maintenance item to take care of. They are also usually fairly easy to change ... usually.


2

All cars do not have the same fuel systems, so we'll take a very generalised stab at this. Running the car very low on gas could damage the fuel pump on many modern vehicles which have an in-tank fuel pump. The fuel acts as lubrication for the pump, and running it too low can cause the pump to burn out. Older carbureted designs tend to have mechanical ...


2

Follow the fuel lines carefully. It appears that the route of the fuel lines and fuel flow goes: From the tank to the fuel pump on the engine in the upper hose to the pump that appears to come from under the firewall, then To the fuel filter in the lower hose from the pump to the right hand side of the fuel filter, then Thru the filter and out on the left ...


2

It is a tank filter most likely and needs changing every 40k, see here : http://www.vauxhallownersnetwork.co.uk/index.php?threads/astra-1-6vvt-petrol-fuel-filter-location.278296/ As for adding a filter, yes you can, but make sure it and the fittings will be rated for the pressure in the supply line.


1

If you live in an area with dirty fuel, then yes probably. If the fuel you purchase is normal then replace at the manufacturer's recommended interval. The other option is to fit an in-line filter, BUT you have to make sure that the filter and fittings are rated for the pressure and be aware of the safety issues when changing it ie making sure the pressure ...


1

I decided to buy a new fuel filter, and measure after the old filter, and before and after the new filter. I let it idle two minutes before taking each reading. After the old filter, which had been in there for ages, it read 35 psi. Before and after the new filter were both also 35 psi, although the needle on the prefilter reading was jittering a little ...


1

From the first picture it appears you have it attached correctly. The one coming up from the side and below would be from the tank. The other one is headed to the engine. Looks like you're golden.


1

I'm not sure I'm following your question. How are you checking your fuel filter? The fuel system will retain fuel pressure (~43psi) even with the key cut off, so you will get fuel out of any part of the fuel system - from fuel pump to fuel rail - if you break something open. Very normal. EDIT - NOTE: The 43psi quoted above refers to the Tuned Port Injection ...


1

On that model the fuel filter is part of the fuel pump in the gas tank.


1

For the sake of marking this question answered: Sapbucket said "I checked my diagnostic port using Torque and it had only one code: P0868 'low line pressure in the transmission'. I reset the code to see if it would come back again. It hasn't! Nor has my low power issue. So, weirdly enough, this problem solved itself. For example this morning it was 33 ...


1

Thanks for the replies all. I found it was actually the pump. Whilst it was working the bearings were shot so it wasnt working well. Replaced and all good.


1

MlAfter a lot of investigation, we found mine was caused by a wire that was coming away inside the distributor cap


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