9

No, you cannot. You state that " I would only have to scrape a little bit to get there safely", however this is not correct - you should clear ALL essential windows before you move the car - the first mile or so as you get out of your neighbourhood are probably the most dangerous, as you will be more likely to encounter pedestrians, cyclists, etc, who you ...


7

Get an insulating blanket for at least your windshield. You place this over the windshield at night, and it prevents frost from forming. The windscreen is the most difficult to get ice-free, so this usually reduces the time to get the car ice-free by half. These can be bought in auto supply shops. There are also blankets that go over all windows. Edit: ...


6

If it's cold enough to have ice covering your windshield, the leftover water will ice up your doors and locks. Depending how soon and how much you use your brakes, you could have some ice forming on the pads and rotors. Daily carwashes will fade your paint real quick. If you do not want to brave the elements, get your car warmed up and use the defrost ...


6

Unfortunately, I think this is simply a consequence of living in colder climates. The only long term solution to this problem would be to somehow seal off the locking cylinder from condensation and the elements, which would be nearly impossible to do if the only method of unlocking the door is by physically inserting and turning a key. A word of advice for ...


6

If you are at least slightly handy with tools (or have a nice friend who is) then it probably wouldn't be too hard to remove the tank c/w pump from the car and take it inside to the warmth and let it defrost in the bath tub and maybe even run some warm water over it. This may fix the tank and pump, but line is harder. Possibly fill tank with winter fluid ...


5

Hyundai/Kia are known for having issues with their EVAP control systems. I owned a 2007 Hyundai Tiburon and the EVAP solenoid was malfunctioning. It made a pretty strong fuel smell because of the leak it caused. Cold weather can cause some of the rubber hose and emissions tubing to harden and crack under stress. Another thing to keep in mind is that when ...


4

I'm not convinced this would even work. The car has been cold-soaked to a temperature below 0. When you spray water on that cold surface, at least some of it will freeze. If the car wash used warm water you'd be okay, but I don't think that's done in practice (there's no need to use warm water, and it'd cost a lot to warm up the water). If there's any ice ...


4

Most diesel engines have block heaters for cold weather starting. This helps ease of starting, but also keeps the coolant at a higher than ambient temperature which helps reduce time to warm the interior of the car. If your car does not have one, it is something that can be added. In cold weather conditions it is also important to have the interior of the ...


3

Ensure that your washer fluid is filled with appropriate temperature rated screen wash so that it does not freeze. What I find helps is to decant a small amount of this screenwash into a Trigger Spray Bottle / Mister Trigger Bottle and keep it handy. Instead of trying to scrape the ice from the outside of the windows, mist it with a liberal spray from this ...


3

You can apply car wax to the top/side weatherstrip - frost won't stick to wax. I don't like the fact that it automatically energizes the window, though; I've seen an awful lot of window bottom weatherstrips destroyed when heavily frosted windows were rolled down further than about 1/8". You live in a climate very similar to my own, too. You may be forced to ...


2

Put some WD-40 onto a rag and wipe the seal area with it. The "WD" stands for water displacement. When applied, it will keep the moisture off of the seal so there will be nothing there to freeze to the window.


2

LOL - I literally just dealt with exactly the same problem too. What I did is stick a roof heating wire inside the tank and plug it into a wall outlet for 12 hours. Another solution from a friend was to boil water and continuously pour it in the tank until the ice is melted, then normally drain all the water using the pump to spray it all out and then fill ...


2

If the system is cold, even as cold as you are stating, there won't be any worries of pressure build up. If the coolant expands to cause pressure issues during freezing weather, you have much bigger issues on your hands (IE: possible freeze plug damage or worse). Really, your concerns should not be concerns at all in this case. As for testing the coolant, ...


2

You really need to get the car sufficiently warm that the ice melts. the real danger with using any other method is that any residual film of water can re-freeze very quickly, especially once the car starts moving through cold air. This is quite a dangerous situation as you can very quickly lose all visibility. Note that in many countries it is illegal to ...


1

My friend had an issue with his 2012 golf door handle. It would open from inside but not the outside one. Started happening when it was cold out. When pulling on the outside handle it felt like it was not connected to anything. After bringing to the dealership they replaced the cable that went from outside handle to unlocking mechanism. There's a revised ...


1

I do commend you for asking before trying. I heard of one person who tried boiling water on his windscreen: not a good idea. :) As others have already stated, washer fluid will not solve your problem. I agree with @Hobbes: if the temperature is cold enough, trying will result in the fluid freezing to the window. What I do usually is to start the car, ...


1

I do pretty much what you do, but I also make sure that I am pulling in fresh air from the outside and not recirculating air, which seems to help a lot with regards to mist & condensation forming inside the windshield. My guess is that my breath, and snow or ice on your shoes melting next to where the recirculation in-duct is, both increase internal ...


1

In my particular case, the cause seemed to be low oil and an oil weight too heavy for the temperature. I only checked the oil level so late because my low oil light never came on, so the oil must have been low enough to cause pressure drop, but not so low as to trip the oil level sensor. Also, I see reports online of 10W oil being too heavy for temps ...


1

In Upstate New York, we have 4 Seasons Winter, Winter, Winter, and Summer. Silicon rubber dressing WORKS (such as Armor All!!!!), it is thick, use poly cloth to apply sparingly to weather strip where door and window freezes. Do 3 or 4 times a season.


1

if your washers don’t work, first check to see if you’re out of fluid, but if not, don’t think that just because the tank isn’t frozen that the jets aren’t, either. It’s cold sitting up there on that hood. If you can get near an electric outlet, a hair dryer can be used to defrost them.


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