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24

An engine flush is basically the process in which a mechanic puts chemicals in the engine oil to break down sludge or carbon deposits from old oil. The difficulty with it is that it can break down sludge that had formed over rubber seals and is actually serving as a secondary engine seal. Furthermore, if your engine has had regular engine oil changes at ...


13

There is no difference between the two. To replace it, you have to flush out the old brake fluid with new fluid. See this answer on how to bleed brake lines for more details.


11

Regular oil as in dino oil? I wouldn't bother. Synthetic oils are usually considered better than dino oil. Many cars don't require synthetic oil, but using a better oil than recommended usually won't lead to problems. Flushing the engine is unnecessary. If you want to change all of the oil, just drain the old oil out and put new oil back in. Some small ...


7

I'll do an engine flush as soon as I see it recommended in the factory service manual. My opinion is to let sleeping dogs (and oil particulates) lie. It sounds like a good idea on the surface, but as explained in the other answer; once an engine is old enough that a mechanic thinks an engine flush would be a good idea, then it's too late. And if the engine ...


6

Once your system expels as much fluid as it can via the pump there is still an additional amount of fluid that is left in the block and other areas that the pump can't push out because there isn't enough fluid and pump is just attempting to push air through the system. Some engines have block drain plugs. You would need to remove those, allow to drain and ...


4

Radiator flush isn't anything magic. It is just a corrosive liquid that attacks everything in contact with it, to greater or lesser extent. You hope it dissolves the blockage before it makes a mess of anything critical like the cooling passages in the cylinder block or the inside of your water pump, or it dissolves a hole in the radiator itself. (Old ...


4

If the hoses are shedding rubber then they are nearing their end of life. To avoid problems, like having one burst open on the road, you should replace any of them which are showing signs of age. Being pliable is NOT a reliable test, in fact when they get old and start to deteriorate they usually get more pliable. Replacing the hoses is not that expensive ...


3

I completely forgot about the draining part, but have no time left. So, here about he antifreeze part. May be, I'll write more later It may work, but is not recommended. Freezing point Antifreeze freezes at -15°C. To prevent antifreeze from freezing, add some water, because water is antifreeze for antifreeze. OK, I had some fun... Seriously, here a ...


3

Gasoline will degrade to a greater extent and you can purchase fuel stabilisers for engines that will be stored over winter for example. Engine oil does not degrade over time to the same extent or at the same rate so if the oil is not exposed to the atmosphere ie it is in a sealed can then it may last easily tens of years - maybe a lot longer...


2

I cannot conceive of any benefit that putting vegetable oil in your engine would give you and many drawbacks: The viscosity is wrong, you would not get the right lubricating properties for your engine, which could lead to damage Vegetable oils do not have the heat tolerance that engine oils do, the smoke point for refined almond oil, which is the highest ...


2

I believe a flush is a good thing, just not with chemicals. I'm disabled so cannot afford a garage to do the easy stuff, but I also get satisfaction from doing things myself. I always do a flush (not with any chemicals or additives) I simply perform a double oil/filter change, I make sure I do it after a run so that the oil is hot, just drain it via the ...


2

It could be any or a combination of all of those, so flushing, cleaning, new (quality or oem) filter etc is a good point to start. I would make, or purchase, a tee and fit a pressure gauge temporarily to monitor the behavior. Any real pressure loss compared to light action should be obvious. I would suspect a chafed wire somewhere which brings the light on. ...


2

I added 44 oz of radiator flush and drain/refill/drain refill (with distilled water) three times. After flushing with distilled water 3X the flush is well diluted. While it would be best to drain it all out, there is obviously no way to do that apart from disassembling the entire cooling system and draining each component. I'd assume that the remaining ...


2

In the most simple terms flushing means you are actively washing the old fluid out using some sort of other liquid (such as a detergent or solvent) rather than passively draining which is just allowing as much as you can to flow out of the system unaided. Does flushing require a special machine? In engine oil terms a flush is done by adding a special ...


1

The only thing that can cause slow warm up is a stuck open or missing thermostat. Change the thermostat and all will be well.


1

My best guess is that you had the heater control on cold so the valve was shut and the heater matrix did not drain. Anytime a mechanic does this, they put the valve to hot so the heater matrix gets drained and so that when trying to add antifreeze the ratio is correct otherwise one can add the antifreeze for the incorrect amount of coolant. And it also helps ...


1

It seems to me the oil might not be returning to the pan quick enough, so after a bit of harder running, when you release the clutch and the RPMs drop, the oil pressure drops to the point where the sensor isn't seeing enough pressure and the light comes on. A Seafoam treatment in the crankcase may help. If it doesn't, I can think of a few things which might ...


1

In my opinion, they seemed to be concerned about the antifreeze and replaced it. That was a good call. They were probably trying to clear the system. Many times on vehicles this age, multiple flushes are required to completely clear the system. They probably wanted to do more but didn't want you to go through the extra expense on a vehicle that age. If they ...


1

I would suggest doing it in bits. Remove both the header tank and the radiator from the car, and flush them out separately, then flush out the engine while they're out. You may well need to replace the hoses, if it's been sat for that long they will probably have perished - don't forget the little ones that go to the heater matrix as well.


1

You'll want to drain the coolant out, of course. Then fill the cooling system with straight water and add dish soap, or better, an industrial degreaser like Purple Power. Run it for about 30 minutes, drain it out, and do another identical flush (water and whatever chemical you used the first time around). After that you'll want to do a third flush, but with ...


1

Your cooling system isn't going to get clogged up because of exposure to air, and you really don't need to do anything before the repair. Because you have a problem with the seal between your oil and cooling systems anything you add could transfer from one to the other, and you don't want chemical flushes getting in your oil. Adding the flush now could ...


1

This is a slightly difficult question to answer, as the amount of time between flushes depends heavily on what kind of car you have and what kind of coolant your car uses. You should be able to find the coolant replacement/flush interval in your owners manual or service manual. In terms of the flushing procedure, this is what I like to do: Obviously, start ...


1

(Expanding on other answers, but this won't nicely fit in a comment:) It's worth noting that many manufacturers - Nissan comes to mind, I think Honda as well - specifically say to never perform an "engine flush." There are a number of documented cases of these flushes causing engine failure. On higher mileage motors, the flush can loosen up debris which ...


1

My understanding of the engine flush process appears to differ from everyone else that has commented or answered so below is my take on it. An engine flush (engine oil or transmission oil) is the process in which ALL of the oil is drained from the system and re-filled; this does not necessarily mean that additives are added to break down sludge and ...


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