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10

You do not need to use "Genuine Honda" power steering fluid. You do, however, need to use power steering fluid made for Hondas/Acuras. If you look at any manufacturer specific manual, you'll see they will specify "genuine" this or that. This is a means to get you to purchase their products. Most often there are alternatives. You cannot use just any power ...


5

Transmission fluid should always be changed per owners manual. If fluid is brown it definitely needs to be changed. Many myths have been created about not changing fluid. Most of these start because some people only change their fluid when a problem occurs. Then blame the problem on the fluid change. There is also the continuing debate about flushing the ...


5

Honda genuine power steering fluid is different than other available choices. The formula is proprietary and not published. It was developed in the early 1990's to solve a significant chatter symptom in Honda power steering rack and pinon units. This problem was caused by incompatibility between the old fluid and the sliding seals on the rack sliding seals. ...


4

The colour is too dark, this fluid should be changed. As mentioned in the comments, automatic transmission fluid lives in 2 places: in the drain pan and in the torque converter. Some cars have a drain plug for the fluid in the pan (that's as simple as a motor oil change), others don't and you need to remove the pan and change the gasket (that's a messy job)....


4

If you are having to add fluid regularly then you do have a leak - transmission fluid doesn't just evaporate, it has to go somewhere for the level to go down. The leak may be small and hard to detect, but it will be there. You probably think there's no leak because you don't find a pool of fluid underneath your car, however it may only be leaking when the ...


4

Clutch fluid doesn't go anywhere the only reason to get your fluid level go down is a leak. However if you drained the system for some reason (parts replacement or whatever) there might be air trapped inside the system after you fill it up. After some time that air gets to the top and fluid level goes down. Again this can only occur if you drain the system. ...


3

A quick search for "washer fluid MSDS" yields a material safety datasheet that lists the flammability limits for methanol as follows: Lower Explosive Limit (LEL): 6 % (by volume) Upper Explosive Limit (UEL): 36 % (by volume) Flash point: 90 °F Autoignition temperature: 878 °F So methanol will readily vaporize (flash off) if it comes in contact with ...


3

As most pumps have the motor external to the fluid then cooling is not an issue as they are only designed for intermittant use. The pump is usually a vane type design so there is little or no friction between the vanes and the body so lubrication there is not an issue, ergo the running of the pump for brief periods is not a problem - most drivers stop ...


3

If your car is running well and you're happy with it I would leave it alone for the trip and just drive it. The most important thing is that your car gets you there and back without trouble, and additives are not likely to increase your car's reliability. Just the opposite in fact, putting anything out of the ordinary in your tank adds an unknown element ...


3

In the Owner's Manual (page 11-5) it is recommended at 100,000 miles (under normal driving conditions). So you are only about 10% overdue. It is recommended to be changed at 50,000 miles if the vehicle is used in severe conditions (page 11-4); vehicles mainly driven in heavy city traffic in hot weather, in hilly or mountainous terrain, when frequently ...


3

If this is going to be a permanent installation, I'd go about doing two things: At every mounting bolt, put a grommet/bushing between the safe and the floor of the truck. This will provide a bit of cushioning for the safe to ride on, keeping the safe up off of the floor itself. This in turn will help prevent rattles down the road. Once the mounting bolts ...


2

Sorry for the long response in advance. Transmission fluid changes are a hotly debated subject so there's a lot of information out there. This is my attempt to try to boil it down so you can make an informed decision. I've been researching something similar recently and here were the understandings I gathered. Based on what you said, though, (and the ...


2

Here is my take: - If you are flushing the power steering fluid, it is ok to use any other brand. Since you are not mixing two blends. But if you are just topping off and you don't know what is already in the system, then safest bet is to use the one from Honda dealer.


2

The fluids are all designed for different conditions, more viscous so they "stick" longer, working temperature ranges, behaviour under pressure ie in the engine bearings etc. Some of the early cars had hydraulic brakes - with water as the working fluid but in winter it was replaced with methylated spirits as it did not freeze... but it did evaporate rapidly....


2

It means that your coolant (radiator fluid) can withstand temperature as low as -35 (assuming Ferandhiet). Coolant is not just water. It includes ethylene glycol to reduce the coolants ability to boil or freeze. Frozen coolant can cause damage to engines and cooling system from the expansion during the freezing process. This is strong enough to crack ...


2

May I suggest a Big Hammer? Usually, alloy wheels separate from the drum just by using a hammer. I'm not sure about your situation, but the hammer trick has worked for me always. This is for cars that have been used regularly and the wheels have been changed regularly (I live in an area where using winter tires is mandatory during the winter). I suggest ...


2

Answer from the Star Tribune, of all places: http://www.startribune.com/brand-clearing-up-confusion-over-transmission-fluid/283401841/ The T-IV automatic transmission fluid meets industry specification JWS3309. Here are several automatic transmission fluids that are listed as suitable for T-IV applications: Valvoline MaxLife Dex/Merc ATF, Mobil 1 Synthetic ...


2

According to the Houghton Chemical website (one manufacturer), "The desired percentage of pre-mixed windshield washer fluid is 37% Methanol which yields a freeze point of –20°F." Although various mixes abound on the market, including summer blends and others for relatively temperate regions of the country, freeze protection of -20 seems to be one ...


2

Highly unlikely to catch fire. Alcohol level is low , maybe 20 % max. I have added 50 % to water for washer fluid and you get a MUCH stronger alcohol smell in the car than any commercial mix. So there is not enough alcohol vapor to reach the explosive limits in the commercial mix. Dripping hydro carbon onto a hot metal surface has a low risk of ignition. We ...


2

The Honda Operator's Manual states: Always use Honda DOT 3 brake fluid. If it is not available, you should use only DOT 3 or DOT 4 fluid, from a sealed container, as a temporary replacement. However, the use of any non-Honda brake fluid can cause corrosion and decrease the life of the system. Have the brake system flushed and refilled with Honda DOT 3 ...


2

Power steering fluid can be stored for several years in a sealed container. However the standards for power steering fluid vary by manufacturer and model year. The vehicle you are driving 5 years from now may not use the same fluid.


2

In a word: Yes. Replace the caliper. If it's leaking it ain't working.


2

That is the engine coolant reservoir. Add coolant until it reaches the minimum mark. Only add coolant when the engine and system is cold. It is dangerous to open the system when it is hot as it is pressurised. Of course the next question is when was it last checked and have you noticed any evidence of leaks?


1

Yes, it is possible that low fluid levels can cause sensors to fail prematurely. One of the purposes of the fluid is to remove heat and if the sensor is then left to get too warm or overheated it can then fail or fail more rapidly. This is one reason why the owner's manual suggest that you check the fluid levels regularly.


1

A couple of drops? Well, if those drops were those large ones then I would empty the reservoir (a syphon bulb works well) and refill with the correct stuff. Give it a day or two then you could repeat - that way the amount left in of the incorrect stuff is only a fraction... I don't think it is worth the hassle of completely draining pump, reservoir, pipes ...


1

No, it is not as hygroscopic as brake fluid. However, it can degrade over time - especially if the level is low and it gets overheated, It tends to go brown. Normally the fluid will only need topping up if there is a leak - I still have a small (1 litre) container I carry in my car due to a previous leak which has been fixed.


1

Yes, this can use generic power steering fluid. I would never use a stop leak product in power steering.


1

Depending on what year your LeCrosse came out will dictate what is specified for your vehicle. GM specified Dexron VI for all 2006-newer automatic vehicles. If yours is a 2005, it should be fine. With that said, it is absolutely NOT okay to use Dexron III (Dex3 - or any other Dexron) in place of Dexron VI (Dex6) fluid. Dex6 is a high-performance synthetic ...


1

This is usually because the ambient air pressure when the bottle was filled is less than the current ambient air pressure where you are. The other possibilty is that a temperature reduction will also have the same effect. Usually a combination of both together though. This was a classic experiment in physics at school by boiling water then sealing the ...


1

You don't need to plug them while they are disconnected, unless the vehicle is going to sit for a while. You obviously don't want dirt getting into them, but if this is a quick in/out to replace the radiator, it's not going to be an issue. You may see a little drainage of transmission fluid from the lines, so plan accordingly. If they are flexible lines you ...


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