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12

Yes you can often repair turn signal flashers! A variety of things can be wrong: here's one of them. Solder joints on the relay printed circuit boards are especially vulnerable to stress cracks, due to the clicking motion day in and day out. Take the case off the relay and use a jeweler's loupe to inspect for hairline cracks, especially cracks those that ...


5

Three major reasons why they were used so long: 1. Cost - Even today a thermal flasher units cost about $2-2.50. The cheapest equivalent electronic flasher unit, which happens to be a direct replacement, costs about $6.50 (NOTE: Prices shown are USD found through a quick internet search). 2. Simplicity - They work until they don't. 3. Longevity - I can ...


3

First of all, thermal flashers do NOT blink faster when a bulb blows - they flash slower. Bulb-out indication by "hyper-flashing" is a function of electronic relay flashers and some solid state flashers. Thermal flashers and electronic relay flashers can both suffer from corroded contacts. Electronic flashers can function with no solid state ...


3

In comparison with a flasher built with a few semi-conductors: They're bigger in size, No, not really. Electronics were pretty big until recently. In 70's a transistor that could hold enough current for a blinker alone was bigger than the entire flasher, not even talking about cost. and probably more expensive, considering their relatively complex and ...


3

If they work inconsistently, it may indicate bad electrical contact. In older cars the technique used for the on/of nature of flashers, is based on heat caused by current. If there's not enough current, due to too much resistance in the wiring, or in the switch, the flashers may continuously light, or not at all. Resisitance in the switch at your dash, or ...


2

Common Issues - Poor Grounds Moisture either in the bulb housing (causing a short) Moisture around the fuse box (or where ever the flasher relay is located) Incorrect bulb type/material (some older cars do not play well with new bulbs as the material used to make the connection in the socket is different)


1

Could be as simple as a fuse. (NOT a fusible link.) The hazard system is on a separate fuse that allows operation even with the ignition off. Do the reverse lights work? That's an important clue. If the hazard lights flash, it's not the flasher module. Here's a wiring diagram that should be very similar to your truck:


1

Every Most electrical circuits in the car should be protected by a fuse. There are commonly two fuse panels, one under the hood with some large fuses, and one somewhere in the cabin with some smaller fuses. You can check your owners manual for the location of these panels, and an explanation of which fuses are connected to which components. If you don't have ...


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