47

Nope, not normal You do not leave a foreign object in a tire under any circumstances. The object can dislodge itself during higher speeds and lead to deflation creating a very high risk event. If they plugged the tire there will be a rubber plug with vulcanizing glue but not a nail or other related object. Validate that it's not a rubber plug, if it's ...


8

You are correct - the weight of that plug is insufficient to cause any measurable disbalance and too soft (and too light) to cause any mechanical damage on the inside. I wouldn't worry about it.


7

No, that is not normal. It needs to be removed and the hole should be patched from the inside. Sealants or plugs are not usually a recommended fix.


6

Here's some issues I have with fix-a-flat: In the case of a large puncture / fast leak, you'll need to add air. Runflats are good because in case of a sudden loss of pressure, they'll get you to a tire shop. With fix-a-flat, if you have a sudden loss of pressure, you'll have to limp your car to a gas station or carry a compressor around. Fix-a-flat isn't ...


4

Is it possible that you got the flat tire by driving over several nails? There may have been multiple nails in the tire and the repair shop only removed/repaired one. The fact that they may have missed one is in itself inexcusable but this could explain the situation. Many shops repair a nail by not demounting the tire from the rim/wheel. They simply ...


4

I highly recommend never to use Fix-A-Flat (or the like) unless it's absolutely a necessity. There are several reasons for this: Fix-A-Flat has the tendency to ruin your tire pressure sensors if your car is equipped with sensors which read directly. Most sensors of this type are tied to the valve stem, which means the Fix-A-Flat has to pass through and ...


4

This damage is not acceptable. Water could get into the inner layers of the tire that contain the steel belts and corrode them which can lead to tread separation. Tread separation would result in tire failure that could lead to loss of control of the vehicle. Proper tire repair standards require that the hole be plugged to seal against water intrusion into ...


4

With the wires snapped like that I would not trust its structural integrity any more. I feel similarly to tlhingan - tyres are one of your most important safety features. You should never compromise on them! Replace now. Don't wait until something catastrophic happens.


3

Both run-flat and fix-a-flat share a disadvantage IMHO: both can let you down in case of a tear on the tire side-wall. This is rather common when off-roading (rocks), which is why no serious off-roading vehicle will lack a (normal-sized) spare tire. But it can also happen in urban driving: Rub the tire once too often against a curb, pressing it against ...


2

There definitely is risk purchasing something without knowing the condition it is in. Is it not running because the battery is out of it, or is something else to blame? Without knowing the details, if things go wrong, you may not be able to recover your money in scrap. Start with the obvious, fuel, oil, spark, coolant, etc. Put some stabilizer in the fuel ...


2

Definitely not normal. Absolutely agree with DucatiKiller The only time it is best to leave a nail in is BEFORE the tyre has gone flat and you intend to drive somewhere, immediately, to get it repaired. If the tyre still holds air, it might just get you there. Pull it out and it will not. Please come back and tell us all that it is a plug that you can ...


1

No, all you get a "Fix a flat" tyre sealant and small compressor. The idea here is to save weight (longer battery range) and space. BMW commissioned Bridgestone to make special tires just for this model. They are different from any other tire that Bridgestone makes (energy efficiency). Even if you would decide to sacrifice your boot space for a spare ...


1

Driving 300 M on a flat tire is easily enough to ruin the tire. The damage can be in the tire and not be visible .If it is low but not flat ,it may still be alright. Stationary on a flat/low tire should not damage it . Think in terms of how you can take the spare and/or the flat tire to the service shop without driving on them. Or , there are inexpensive air ...


1

You absolutely can use it again. The places that change tires try to discourage people from using fix-a-flat because it makes a mess when they go to remove a tire, but it doesn't take away from the integrity of the tire. That being said, it's probably a good call to keep another can of fix-a-flat in the trunk. In my experience, fix-a-flat doesn't do a great ...


1

Driving on a flat flexes the internal cord far more than it was designed to take, so the tire casing is compromised to an unknown extent. If you only bop around on surface streets at 40 MPH, you could probably stick with it, but I would not want to run it on a 20-mile freeway commute. A blowout at speed could damage your $$ wheel too. I would make my ...


1

Tires are really important to me as they are the only part of the car touching the ground. So with tire damage this extensive, I would replace the tire, even a pair of tires if I can't find the same make and model.


1

It is a good idea to leave the nail in the tire when you take it for repair as it shows the shop where the damage is, or at least some of it, and what caused it. This helps get a faster and more certain repair on the tire. However, during the repair they should remove the nail - they should never, ever leave the nail in after they have fixed the tire! If ...


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