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7

That's not steel and chrome, that's aluminum. There is a coating over the rim. It's some sort of epoxy. It seals the oxygen from touching the aluminium so aluminium oxides aren't created. What you see there is aluminium oxide on the rim. I will slowly eat the rim and 2000 years from now it will be a small piece of aluminium. To stop the creep of ...


6

We see this hard chrome chipping and often. It is caused by the materials; specifically the large hardness difference between the chrome plating and the aluminum wheel material. The more flexible wheel changes shape as it is stressed by road bumps and the hard chrome cannot flex so it breaks away. Then corrosion gets going under the cracked away flakes. ...


5

The paintwork looks like it's suffering from orange peel. It may be that you need more or thicker coats on it. To get a nice shiny finish from what you have you effectively need to flatten out the outer surface of the paint finish. There are a few ways to do this. As stated previously, cutting paste can be quite effective but may take quite a long time. ...


4

Clearcoat that is dull can be polished back to a nice shine in most cases. A polish of the correct grit and type is needed. This one works well for us, others are available. A "dual Action" polisher is the easiest tool to use. Polishing can be done by hand with much time and effort. A single action rotary buffer tool can be used but needs an experienced ...


3

It obviously depends very much on what kind of trim pieces you are wanting to respray. What they are made of and the sort of finish you are after. I am not sure what the trim is you wish to renovate but most cars of the last. 25-30 years or more have utilised some form of moulded hard plastic or softer rubberised style materials. Hard plastics are ...


3

It's not the application technique, but the material being applied. Chrome plating is a process where actual molecules of chrome metal are attracted to a surface using electrical current. It covers the surface of the parts with a layer of real metal. Of course metal is very hard, and will be difficult to scratch. The strength of paint will be limited to ...


3

I'm not a paint & body guy, but every one I have talked to suggested to me you put down one layer, then let it dry until it gets tacky (about 10 minutes or so), then lay down your next layer. I guess since you sanded between layers you should have good adhesion, but ... I would suggest that cutting then buffing are in your future. Right now I'm guessing ...


2

I finally found some information that has helped clarify this process a bit. "Neo-Chrome" (which seems to be a brand name) along with the other terms I've come across including "Aurora Electroplating" and "Burnt Titanium", all describe the process of Physical Vapor Deposition, or PVD. This process involves evaporating metals inside of a vacuum using an ...


1

As others have said there's no specific requirements to the motion used to apply something like cleaner wax - the important thing is that you get a good even coat of the wax on. This is generally easier to do with relatively tight circular motions and you can usually get a more even pressure this way as well. Depending on the consistency of the wax and the ...


1

There is no "Rule" that says you have to do it a certain way. It is best to follow the wax manufacturer's directions. Most people apply with an overlapping circular motion to ensure the application is uniform and complete. From my experience, wiping back and forth can miss some spots.


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