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14

That process you're describing is VERY familiar to me - I do that for people from time to time. The difference is REALLY SIGNIFICANT... and at most it should take you five minutes of actual work per headlight - it's really pretty minimal, with diminishing returns VERY quickly. ALWAYS WET-SAND. Do NOT dry-sand. Start with nothing less than #600 sandpaper, ...


8

The shop vac can barely run because of the back pressure when hooked up the the tailpipe. If there is a severe exhaust restriction it could explain the presence of fumes in the cabin: if the engine is running the exhaust gases have to escape from somewhere, regardless of whether the exhaust is free-flowing or not. If your vehicle employs an EGR setup that ...


7

From your description, it sounds like you have a plugged catalytic converter. The glowing red exhaust pipe and lack of power is what would clue me to that.


6

Seeing as how the vehicle is over 20 years old, I'm doubting you are getting outgassing. That should have occurred a long time ago. If you drive with the window open to ensure fresh air flow, does the headache still occur? Maybe you just have a psychosomatic reason and your head just starts hurting because deep down you hate the truck (really just kidding ...


5

I think @Zaid is correct on the first one (A/C). The second one, however, I believe is actually the Power Steering Pressure Sensor (PSPS) Connector, which uses the same pig tail as the injector harness, but would account for the good running engine. (Motorcraft part number WPT372) EDIT: Looking at the new pictures, it appears the upper pulley replaces an A/...


5

Given its proximity to the AC compressor, the one to the left appears to be the wire for the AC compressor clutch; the connector looks similar to the one for a brand-new replacement: I'm speculating that the one on the right side of the picture is a fuel injector connector, a clearer picture from a different angle would help:


5

In answer to the question of how to test your coolant mix, you would use an antifreeze and coolant tester In answer to why, you would want to ensure that your coolant mixture is correct as this provides protection against icing in the winter, enhances the effectiveness of the system in the summer and provides some corrosion inhibitors to prevent your ...


5

I figured it out today. The spark plug in one of the cylinders blew out of the head while driving. The 'squeaking' was actually a whistling as air was pushed passed the spark plug.


5

That is the anti lock brake module or ABS. While it is in you engine compartment it has nothing to do with the engine. The reason it has a 4x4 sticker on it is that ABS for 4x4 vehicles is slightly different than the ABS on regular two wheel drive vehicles.


5

On most vehicles, the larger the engine the more fuel it burns. The 5.8L size is the displacement (or swept volume) of all the cylinders (eight in your case) added up. When the cylinders fill with the air/fuel mixture, this mixture should be stoichiometric at about 14:1 ratio (no matter what kind of gas/petrol engine you run, this is basically what you are ...


5

tl dr; I'm sure minimal damage (if any) would occur from this, but there really is no telling. A small amount of dirt would usually not cause an issue. It also depends on the size of the dirt. Most "stuff" which would be sitting where you're talking about is probably fairly small. The biggest worry is if it gets stuck at the side of the piston and is forced ...


4

I'd suggest you're right in your diagnosis and, yes, it should be safe to drive on a minimal basis. The only issue you might see is a check engine light due to the tank not being sealed completely. Also, your fuel will absorb more water than it would otherwise, though this will still be only a small amount. Be careful while fueling and get the repair done as ...


4

I followed TDHofstetter's advice (partly) and I can now report that it is indeed quite effective. I wet-sanded with 600, 1200 and 2000 grit sandpaper (my local hardware store had nothing in between or finer). That removed the yellow discoloration and left the lenses smooth to the touch, but still a little cloudy. I then applied the Mother NuLens polish, ...


4

I agree this sounds more like a brake pad issue than a wheel bearing issue. The main reason is, with a wheel bearing issue, you will feel it more than you'll hear it. When the wheel bearing is bad enough to hear it, it's to the point where it is a true safety issue and you shouldn't be driving it anymore. If it were the wheel bearing at this point, you'd ...


4

Since you qualified the exhaust system has no leaks, check the erg tube for leaks, also check the exhaust manifold gaskets if it has them, between manifold and cylinder head. Also check for oil leaks that drip onto exhaust manifolds, this will create CO and will get sucked into the passenger cabin. Best way to check for exhaust system leaks (exhaust ...


3

Testing Coolant is pretty easy using specific gravity. A tester has several balls that have slightly different densities. Different balls will float depending on the concentration. You want to test your concentration to be sure it wont freeze or over heat. The Antifreeze does not transfer heat very well. That is why we mix. The water does most of the ...


3

The flap is called a "rollover valve". It is there to help prevent fuel from escaping in the event of a rollover. It also has the added benefit of helping to prevent fuel from being syphoned from your tank. Unless the CEL / MIL / idiot light comes on, just leave it as it is. A number of cars do not have this flap, and work perfectly fine without it.


3

Following up with the resolution: I was right about the diagnosis. The rubber hose joining the filler neck to the fuel tank was deteriorated and cracked. The same was true of the vapor return hose. I was wrong about the cost of repair. I was charged about $375 in labor and $335 in parts, for a total of $810 (USD). The main labor cost was for removing ...


3

Fords often have a heater core bypass that allows coolant to bypass the heater core, kinda like a pressure relief valve. To test it, warm up the engine and pinch the bypass closed (wrap a towel around the hose if you use locking pliers to avoid cutting it) which forces coolant through the heater core. Check to see if you have heat...if so then put a valve ...


3

There is a blend door actuator in the heater box; that should open when you turn the knob to "hot", allowing warm air to come out. It is probably stuck, or it's not operating correctly. Could be a bad actuator, or a problem with the circuit.


3

It sounds to me like the fault is within the instrument binnacle or associated wiring as opposed to the lights being genuine warning lights. It sounds like a classic "shorting out" problem. This could be caused by a loose connection or poorly installed accessory (immobilizer, aftermarket radio, etc...) I'd be inclined to start checking wiring plugs are ...


3

I will keep my answers fairly simple, as the procedure will differ, and I'm unfamiliar with your vehicle. Clean the MAF sensor. It is a very thin metal filament inside a circular component attached to the throttle body. It's purpose is to measure the volume of the incoming air. Clean the throttle body. All the incoming air passes through the TB. While the ...


3

Idler Pulleys are generally used to either provide constant tension or make the belt wrap around more of the next pulley, which equals more contact area around that next pulley. An idler pulley, by definition, does not drive a device.The A/C clutch is used to engage and disengage the A/C compressor so as to provide a more-or-less constant temperature inside ...


3

Sounds more like brake pads are worn out. But with the possible safety issues I would agree with the other answer or comment that this should be looked at by someone knowledgeable ASAP.


3

I'm not familiar enough with that engine to say for sure, but the circled pulley might be the water pump. The wobbling is not a good sign, it indicates that a bearing is failing. There are four accessories that are likely to be driven by a belt or belts at the front of the engine: The water pump (it will probably have a largish hose or hoses with hose ...


3

Air flow in the heater box is not in the direction I originally thought. Having found a diagram, I was able to determine the air is passed thru the AC evaporator core all the time. Then, depending on the blend door position, the air either goes thru the heater core or bypasses it. After that, it is sent wherever the selector is set to send it in the cabin. ...


3

Remove & Replace on an 4x4 Automatic is 6.6hrs. This doesn't include fluid fill or any other maintenance work like the filter so add another .5 hrs or so.


3

As Paulster2 stated, but before you put the spark plugs back in, spin the engine over on the starter and get the oil pumped around the system so it does not start as dry. Over 5 years most of the oil will have drained out and a no-load spinning will at least help reduce the initial wear.


3

That looks like quite a bit more than the linked questioner had. I'd say head gasket failure, but if you only do short trips then it's possible that it's simply condensation. Take it out on the highway and let it get really hot.


3

It isn't integral with the rotors, but the bearings are integral with the hub itself. It comes as a unit, which attaches to the steering knuckle. The rotor is separate and attaches over the lugs (wheel studs) onto the hub. You cannot change out just the bearing itself from the hub, at least they really aren't made that way. This is very common on modern day ...


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