11

You absolutely can! I've painted several of my race cars this way, on a limited budget. The looked wonderful, and I usually wrecked them before the paint was an issue. If you prep very well (all automotive paintjobs are 90% prep work, and 10% spraying) you can get outstanding results. You do need to have some painting experience, even with a rattlecan. ...


6

The post is not so much direct techniques as those will vary by type of roof and upholstery, age, and condition. Automobile upholstery falls under two basic types that being either true leather or a vinyl pseudo-leather. The pseudo-leathers (vegan leathers) are synthetic “breathable” leather substitutes, basically are plastic coatings, usually ...


5

Sounds like the temperature sensor is broken. A new one is $40-$55, and it's a 30 minute job to replace if you've never done it before (it lives behind the grill in front of the radiator). Not uncommon for these to fail on Subarus and give weird readings. Following Paulster2's comment, here's an image of what the sensor looks like; In this image (of a 2007 ...


3

Can you do it? Yes. Will you ever lose your vehicle in a car park? No. Not in a million years. Is it a good idea? Well, you're going to do the prep yourself anyway. Strip and prep to a rolling chassis, and get a quote from a local paint shop for a blow-over in the original color (or close to it). It may be surprisingly close in price to the cost of the ...


3

Determine if the "Leather" is leather or vinyl. Then buy appropriate leather or vinyl cleaners, kits, solutions, etc. What does the process look like for cleaning leather? Depends on the product, but generally 2 or 3 steps: First you use a light cleaner. Then you use a conditioner (and then sealer). Some products require additional cleanings in between ...


3

I appreciate the Sherwin-Willaims Automotive Paint Troubleshooting Guide (PDF) for this. It is a very thorough guide that gives descriptions of what is going wrong, why, and how to avoid/fix it. Here's a rundown of various problems with sample pictures of common names for problems. You can use the names as a starting point for further research. I'll be ...


3

tl;dr: I'm a big proponent of washing and waxing the car. For the purposes of bounding the answer to a reasonable number of words: what should one do to keep the outside of their car looking as close to new as possible over the years Fundamentally, what do we see when we look at a new car? It's clean. It's shiny. It's not rusty. ... in what ...


2

1) Do a couple of very thorough, professional grade cleanings per year, inside and out. This may include special treatment for the body to remove hard-nosed particles that get stuck to the paint. You can try to do it yourself with some special clay bars available for it. 2) Wash the car every week by hand with warm water and soap. 3) Pay attention to dings ...


2

Personally i would be looking at epoxy resin, fibre-glass or similar. If the panel or body can be rotated or oriented so it is near flat it will make things easier. Epoxy has a number of advantages. It bonds well to many surfaces, and can be sanded and painted. Its less likely to crack than bondo/bog/filler and can be added in layers. Welding or ...


1

I'd plug weld the hole then dress the weld and lead load it or add a light skim of P38. If a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well. All other methods tend not to last as holes that have been simply bridged and filled without welding tend to "drop out" and show through the paintwork after a few months.


1

90% of a good paint job is in the body work. Unless the body work is done flawlessly you will see every ding. Just about anyone a can paint a car it's the body work that counts. I would go with a white color paint, it hides the more. The paint should last a few years. You maybe be better off doing the body work yourself (flawlessly) and then getting a paint ...


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