13

IMHO that powder is either: Dust, that got "burned" by the hot exhaust manifold and transformed into some yellow-looking substance. Sulfur, as the color has a striking resemblance to sulfur. The presence of sulfur could indicate a leak and a faulty emission treatment system. There are test strips available to test for sulfur. Should you decide to try a test ...


11

If your engine was running / exhaust manifold hot; the yellow is then zinc oxide. It would result from a galvanized steel manifold which has naturally oxidized. At room temperature the ZnO is white , I forget the temperature where it turns yellow.


9

Firstly.. If there is a gasket it should be replaced. If the studs etc are in very good condition then you could try undoing & re-torquing them. However due to the materials and heat cycles these parts go through the studs are often very tight or seized up. To repair this you'll have to be prepared to remove and clean up all the threads, or just buy ...


8

Seeing as how your car has a turbo, the only place it would be leaking and you'd hear a ticking noise is pre-turbo, so the exhaust manifold at the head (header) and the down pipe on the hot side to the turbo. The turbo, due to it's nature of homogenizing the exhaust flow, will pretty much eliminate any ticking noise which may be due to an exhaust leak. While ...


5

You should definitely try to extract it. Preparation: Heat the manifold with a blowtorch Jolt the bolt with a pin punch Soak the bolt with bp-blaster or another penetrating oil Removal If the bolt is protruding: Place two nuts on it, counter them against each other and try to screw the bolt out. If the bolt is protruding but not enough for the two nuts: ...


5

Try torching them again. The only bolts that I couldn't get off with a torch are the ones that snapped. If the bolt didn't turn an orange glow, you're not getting it hot enough. Cutting them off, as has been pointed out in the other answers, won't let the bolt magically slide out because a bolt that won't budge is a bolt that seized (corrosion and rust ...


4

That appears to be the gasket. Take a look at the rockauto parts selector, it has a tab like that.


4

A copper washer could be a better bet - your anti-seize is designed to stop threads seizing so as it is not primarily designed to seal them it may not, however you could be lucky and it will.


3

There's nothing inherent to say that using a used part won't work. Most likely your mechanic was advising against it as it can prove to be a false economy because of the amount of labor involved in changing them over and there's really no way of knowing how long a used one will last, if it fails a week later you've wasted the money, if it lasts a year (your ...


3

Yes, you can do it, if you have sufficient access to the hole. A tap with handle is going to be around 2"-4" long. Do you have enough clearance to get it in place, perpendicular to the surface of the head? If not, will lifting the engine slightly - remove engine mount nuts, lift engine with your floor jack - give you enough room? Another question: How many ...


3

If the manifold studs come out easily enough that would make the gasket cleaning job easier, however they're usually a bit stubborn to remove so working around them is better than risking damaging the threads etc if they're tight. You can carefully use a razor/scraper blade etc to remove the old gasket remains.. But go slowly and don't dig into the cylinder ...


3

You can drill and tap a cast iron, yes, only difference - it is more fragile than steel, but it should not slow you down. Other option is to weld it in lower part, where the steel pipe starts. It doesn't really matter where you place it as long as it is before Catalytic Converter. In fact, if you place it in one of manifold pipes it will be a little ...


3

You COULD drill the head enough or grind them just enough to get the rest out. Slip it off and see if you can get a pair of locking pliers on it after you get it off. If you don't regularly use tap and dyes, it's really easy to ruin your head. I would just try to pull it off and try to grab what's left of the bolt with the pliers, if not then you'll have to ...


2

I would do as you suggest and cut them. Once you have got the manifold off the engine, you could drill the old bolts out and then just use a normal pair of nuts and bolts to fasten the exhaust to the manifold. Alternatively you could re-tap the manifold for some new bolts.


2

Use a shop vac. Attach the hose to the side that blows with tape. Then tape the other end to the tail pipe. Now turn on the vac. its time to use the soap with water in spray bottle spray everything to find leek. This worked great for me. Hopefully This helps Someone.


2

After a lot of research, I decided to start by trying a pair of vice-grips on what was left of the stud. I cranked them down real tight, and it came right out. If that didn't work I'd have been going down the route of drilling, welding, or other more terrible options.


2

I'd say hyd lifter failure is pretty unlikely unless you ran your engine to extremely high RPM's right before this started. A leaking exhaust manifold can produce a sharp and short puff of exhaust that sounds like a tick. (Happened on my '92 Mustang often) If you can reach your manifold bolts, trying tightening them a little. They will definitely have actual ...


2

It depends on many factors like operating revolutions, engine performance, manifold location (cooling), etc. If you are concerned about overheat - don't worry, hot manifold is okay. Some high performed engines can heat a manifold to yellow hot. Car engine could heat it to red hot. If your concern is safety of other components of a car, you can wrap your ...


2

Yes, it can be repaired with an aftermarket unit. The manifold has visible welds on it already, so it can be welded to. Almost any aftermarket catalytic converter should be weldable. To perform this repair, a shop will have to remove the exhaust manifold from the car. Almost any exhaust & muffler shop should be capable of performing this repair. However,...


1

I don't think you mean dump pipe (wastegate), where the length is meaningless unless it was a major restriction. I think you meant down pipe, which is after the outlet of the turbine. The best solution is no pipe at all, which offers the least restriction - to flow, not pressure change. This is usually not practical, so the shortest length that carries ...


1

Most aftermarket street performance systems dump to atmosphere. If your system dumps to the inlet in order to avoid incorrect MAF readings and rich transient throttle conditions then I'd go with the OEM pipe length as this will be what the ECU is expecting. Some MAF sensors have a minimum (or optimum) length from various components so I'd start be ...


1

Hi I would the sensor after cat converter, the voltage should be 0.000>0.570 once in a while going to 0.750. If that’ok then I would check cat converter being blocked needs cleaned if possible or replace


1

If there is a tennis ball sized dent in the exhaust system then there are two possibilities. It may be that the dent is causing a restriction in the system which is causing pressure to build upstream of the dent. However, if the dent is in one of the expansion boxes or silencers, it may be that the baffles within this box have become dislodged or broken. ...


1

It really depends, but most of the time you won't get enough oil off of the valve cover to start a fire. You're right, there will be a lot of smoke. Before you start it, you should try and clean off as much as possible. This will limit the amount of smoke which is produced. Also, check the oil to ensure there's enough (actually, if it's been sitting over the ...


1

For a quick and dirty repair you can just use a threaded rod with the same thread size/pitch and cut it to size. You could also use a matching bolt and cut the head off (use a high grade bolt). Attention: automotive engineers love to use some unusual thread size/pitch, perhaps you want to measure the thread with a matching gauge. Do not forget the anti-seize ...


1

If you go to, or call, a dealer they should be able to tell you (or sell you) what you need. If you luck is good you may be able to find the information by looking at a parts diagram if you can find one.


1

Get rid of that flapper air cleaner system, unless you live somewhere with a winter that insists you have it. Plug the manifold hole. OR... Get a pro to braze the riser tube, most likely done while still on the truck. OR... Get a calm and mellow person to carefully drill/tap the exhaust manifold, to install a compression to male NPT adapter fitting with a ...


1

You could try the standard leak test: Mix some water with dishwashing soap in 1:1 mix and apply it to any surface that could harbor a leak. Bubbles appear at the site of the leak.


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