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20

It is highly probable that the reason your car was reluctant to start was that the time you were running diagnostics had sapped some of the charge from the battery. The battery on the car will not charge unless the engine is running. It is unlikely that this device would harm your vehicle but it is theoretically (and practically) possible to do temporary ...


9

To my knowledge there is no way a scanner can cause issues with your computer electronics. This device is a read only device. It doesn't change anything in your computer. It does, however, communicate with the computer. Through this communication it can give the computer commands, such as to clear the codes. This doesn't write anything to the computer, but ...


8

Did you set the protocol for the chip to monitor on? e.g. ATSP5 for KWP-2000 or ATSP0 for "best guess". What about checking the headers as well - ATH1? I use the following string of commands to monitor my full KWP bus, which is obviously different from CAN, but is similar enough that it might be of use: ATI -- check connection from app to scan tool ATH1 --...


7

try this AT H1 this will turn on headers, then do 0100 you will get something like 7E8 06 41 00 BE 3E A8 13 7E9 06 41 00 98 18 80 13 which says you are getting results from ECUs 7E8 (engine) and 7E9 (transmission)if you are running on an 11bit CAN. If you get 18 DA F1 18 06 41 00 88 18 00 13 18 DA F1 10 06 41 00 BE 5F A8 13 then its results from ...


6

No. The tool in and of itself cannot do any "harm" to the vehicle. If you were testing apps with the engine off, it is quite possible that the battery may have drained to the extent that it gave some hiccups while starting. Low fuel level may also be to blame here. However, If the vehicle has error codes present which are cleared with the tool, the ...


5

Just this morning I connected an ELM327 to a '05 Volvo XC90. After only 1km, the message was displayed for "Anti-skid service required", and then "Anti-skid temporarily unavailable". I removed the ELM, and went home, and checked the car on the laptop based Volvo VIDA/DICE. This showed a BCM fault, CAN network communication error with SAS (steering angle ...


4

Start off with a copy of the service manual for your car. The electrical schematics will help you understand where the various annunciators come from. Earlier cars typically have less data available via ODB II (whose original intent was to provide a way to monitor pollution controls). If you add something like a Raspberry Pi to your project you can use the ...


3

First let's define your query to the ECU: 19 - ReadDTCInfo 02 - Report DTC by Status Mask 08 - Status Mask Ignore all this, it's only the module taking a moment to reply 77F 03 7F 19 78 77F 03 7F 19 78 77F 03 7F 19 78 77F 03 7F 19 78 77F 03 7F 19 78 77F 03 7F 19 78 This is a multi-frame message 77F 10 6B 59 02 99 00 00 ...


2

So it seems that it's only Elm327 adapters that use a FTDI serial to usb adapter chip that have these latency problems: The FTDI can’t send a USB packet to the computer for every byte that comes from the Arduino’s microcontroller. Instead, it stores the serial data in an internal buffer and only sends a USB packet when the buffer is full, or after a ...


2

Polling interval is simply how often you request data from the port. There is a hardware side baud rate that you must meet (probably 38400bps for ELM327) and usually you cannot change that as it is determined by the protocol. The software you mentioned simply lets you set the rate at which you send/receive data bits to meet this requirement (there are ...


2

I just had a problem using one of this OBD2 Bluethoot module on my Chevrolet Trax 2015, where my Traction Control System stop working (Engine and TCS dash lights came on), also the transmission wasn't able to shift gears. I even have to push the car back to the parking spot. No air conditioner, no MPH reading, no fuel efficiency info. Unplugged the OBD2 ...


2

I recently purchased a 'ebay' obd2 dongle. Plugged it into my 06 Mercury mountaineer, to check a CEL code. I was using the Torque app. Drove with it for a few miles and the Wrench symbol came up on my display. Truck went into a limp mode. I turned the truck off, removed the dongle and returned home. Next day used the truck and it was fine. Jump ...


2

Most "cheap" or "universal" type code readers are only going to be able to do things that are exposed as OBDII parameters. The car manufacturers are free to do whatever else they want using whatever proprietary protocols they want. Air bags are not a part of the OBDII spec, and thus requires a special reader. Some readers might have the right protocols ...


2

No, it is not possible to get true values from OBD-II ELM327. You have to have a dedicated exhaust gas analyzer to figure that out, like this one: But you can estimate it using a lambda sensor Although I fear that the theoretical graph is not going to be very useful in the real world:


2

You will not be able to read everything using OBD. Sometimes you can be lucky and the proprietary protocol your car uses can provide you with the right info, however this wouldn't be reliable as it will be considered a diagnostic session by the car's computers (and you may not be able to talk to two computers at once). Instead I suggest you reverse-engineer ...


2

OBD II only guarantees communication and specific PID availability with the engine computer. For effect I repeat, ONLY the engine computer. The passenger seat belt indicator would be either part of the body control system or the restraint/airbag system. These are manufacturer specific and will change depending on the make, model and year of the car. ...


2

You might want to try Multi ECU Scan. It's a free/non-free software suite that works with most, if not all, FIAT's. Most of the diagnostic tools can be accessed for free. Other tools require a licence. The licence is not that expensive so it could be worth the investment. In no way is this my software nor my company. I know about the software because I used ...


2

As the article says, the copies can often misreport what code version they have, so that's of no use in determining what they can or can't do. All that can be extracted from the microcontroller is the machine code that sets up and operates the microcontroller, not the original source code, so modifying it substantially is likely beyond most of the clone ...


1

I believe OBD II is an international standard but that not all functions are uniformly supported by all models so some things may not be available. I have no idea about the generic interface but I can tell you that on Volkswagen group cars it is possible to interrogate the air-bag module via the OBD II port and that will give you a good indication if the ...


1

The speed sensor should be located on the outside of the transmission housing on the passenger side. Looks like this. EDIT: Also found a diagram to repair the DPS6 transmission. This is where the speed sensors are located. Its a bit confusing as it assumes you have the transmission pulled out, but I hope it helps.


1

You can't do this through generic OBD-II. Take a look at acceptable OBD-II queries by mode. There is nothing there to provide information about how the vehicle is constructed. That's not to say that some manufacturers may not have proprietary undocumented commands, but those aren't generally available, and certainly can't be relied on to be present, or used ...


1

You didn't list the apps you tried, but Torque (http://torque-bhp.com/) is what I am using (on a different vehicle); however, the Cadillac CTS forums has numerous posts on folks using the app with success.


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