35

I think your guess will be correct. The clamp has probably been over-tightened in the past, has stretched and is no longer giving a good tight connection. The copper will have been added to act as a shim to make a tight connection.


18

Since you lost power to your 12v accessory socket at the same time as the other systems, I can’t see this as being an computer malfunction. This sounds to me like you have a fault in your main fuse box which is taking out a number of circuits. There may be a bad connection of one of the main fusible links. Unbolting them and cleaning may fix it. You may ...


10

You may have a loose or corroded engine ground connection. The next time you have the electrical failure, leave the ignition switch ON and, using a voltmeter, measure voltage between the negative post on the battery and any shiny clean metal part that is bolted to the engine block. This should always read zero volts, or nearly zero. If it reads something ...


9

Have a look at this picture: From here. Corrosion (the green stuff) can conduct electricity. If one wire in that picture went to the battery positive terminal and the other went to the battery negative terminal, then it would act like a connection between the two. Not quite a short circuit, but not an open circuit either. If the cause of the problem ...


6

You may just have a bad connection on the battery posts. This would account for the sudden loss of power and also explain why everything powered up once the jump leads were added. Try disconnecting the battery connections and cleaning the connectors and battery post with some sand paper or wire wool, then reconnect. The reason why the car would not start ...


5

A battery should be able to run the flashers for several hours and still start the car. There should be a sticker on your battery which tells the month and year it was manufactured. The sticker will either be M/YY indicating the month and year, or a code such as D6, where D is the fourth month of the year (sequentially mapped months A-L), and 6 is short for ...


5

I have fitted many accessories to cars, trucks and agricultural vehicles, some taking less than 1 amp and others several hundred or more. I have never put fuses on the earth or ground side. If the ground side fuse breaks then the device may actually cause more damage to itself or other items as it "finds" an alternate path to ground.


5

The effect of corroded or poorly soldered battery terminals is responsible for excessive voltage drop, not parasitic current drain. They are not the root cause of the parasitic drain.


4

The fuse box is designed for all vehicles and positions only used as needed for each vehicle. First check if those empty fuse slots have terminals in them, without terminals adding fuses does nothing. Then check the legend to see if that item or function is fitted or valid for the vehicle. Example : A fuse position can be provided for diesel heater plugs ...


4

Why copper? Because it is soft without being too plastic and easy to obtain. It is also highly conductive both thermally and electrically. Why do it? The terminal no longer clamps the post. The post is too small or the clamp is too large. This creates a sleeve. The thread on that bolt may also be stripped or seized. It is very commonly done to just hammer ...


4

I would bet there's an issue with the sensor grounding out when it's installed into the tank due to it staying pegged 100% of the time on the dash.


4

If the machine is still under warranty, take it back to the dealer and have them fix it. That's what the warranty is for, and it's their obligation to do so. New vehicle warranties come from the manufacturer, not from the dealer. If multiple dealers are available to you, you might take it to another dealer rather than the one whose "fix" was unavailing.


4

The test you are doing is not valid and shows you nothing really. For a start, you have not got it wired in parallel, you have got it wired in series. You would usually wire a voltmeter in parallel to measure voltage. You are therefore measuring the battery voltage with some voltage dropped across whatever is turned on in the car at that moment. In a ...


3

Welcome to Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair! I have a 1985 MK1 Golf Cabriolet running a Pierburg 2e2 which I've had a number of issues with so hopefully I can help. This car runs a mechanical fuel pump so if the engine is turning over, the fuel pump ought to be drawing fuel. The fact that it ran on carb cleaner suggests to me that it isn't getting ...


3

The low beam circuit uses dedicated fuses. There are no fusible links in the headlamp circuits. In your case fuse 11 is the passenger side low beam.


3

Believe it or not, the first thing to do is to check all the tire pressures to make certain they are within spec and equal. A low pressure tire will make more revolutions/mile than the other properly inflated tires, and can confuse the ESC/ABS module into thinking there is a problem with one of the wheel speeds. The most common hardware failure that causes ...


3

There's a couple of things on the Captiva that can cause this - the root of the problem is that the wipers aren't registering as being in the "park" position correctly. This can be caused either by the wiper motor bearings "sticking" causing the wipers to not return to park correctly or the plastic disc on the wiper motor shaft that triggers the park ...


3

Is there any way to check for physical obstruction? I'm wondering if if the float is getting caught on a baffle that's stopping it from moving through it's full range?


3

Welcome to the site, and thanks for putting in a good amount of details. The fact that you have replaced the battery and your seat motors still work when you have the issue eliminates a bad battery or main battery connection. The symptoms sound a lot like a computer issue to me because the computers control the dash lights, ignition, either the computer isn'...


3

Yes, either: the fuse or terminal is loose which increases the resistance and causes it to get hot or the terminal or holder is too small and it again gets hot due to the current and resistance. Whatever the cause, it needs to be corrected - wires of sufficient size, clean and tight terminals and a quality fuse holder.


3

I think your battery is okay. You are getting 12.7 volts after driving, which means that it is fully charged. It's the charge after sitting a few days that concerns me, 12.2 volts is generally considered 50% charge, 12.0 is 25% charge, so after a few days your battery is dropping below 50% charge. That's actually fairly normal as modern cars have battery ...


3

No, you will not be shorting the battery. The relay COIL, for a 12V relay, is designed so that when it's energized (i.e. connected between 12V and ground) will only pass enough current to close the relay contacts. Technically, the relay coil is generally a wire winding around a core material, usually laminated iron pieces. The coil presents both an ...


3

Like normal magnets, electro magnets can only attract (pull) metallic objects, so the injector coil could not repel the solenoid valve.


2

For a battery thats 10 years old is very very old.. If you are not starting your car atleast once a week to keep the battery flowing id get a device that does a small trickle of flow to keep battery from just sitting because that really damages the internals. Can test the battery by taking it to an auto parts store like napa, autozone or o'reilly's. You ...


2

Another reason for burnt connectors could be from cargo or passengers sitting in the back seat on the driver's side. The weight on the seat cracks the plastic fuel pump cover and wiggles the connector causing the pins to heat up. If left too long, the pins will melt the plastic around them causing gas to leak through the connector. This happened to me ...


2

The button on the lid isn't working, or there's a problem with the switch wiring. Your testing has been pretty thorough, you know that the actuator works, that really doesn't leave any other options. You will need to get at the switch and wiring and do some testing, replacing the switch if necessary. EDIT: It sounds like the switch has been tested as ...


2

Thanks for all of the comments and suggestions for how to get my golf to run. I took a second look at the Pierburg, removed all the jets and measured the fuel flow and float angle. I found that the one of the pull down units wasn't creating a vacuum and replaced that - Unfortunately it nothing solved my immediate problem. So I turned my attention back to ...


2

When you pushed the sub into position, you effectively had a large lever (the sub) against a small wire, terminal and screw. The terminals are designed to be adequate for normal use, ie not loaded or having the wires under tension. Making sure that the wires are not strained is good practice. One thing you could do is clip the wires to a retaining point so ...


2

It's purely for power purposes. If you are just towing a small trailer you'll only need to use the black one , but if you also have a fridge and other high power kit on a caravan, then you will need to also use the white socket. pfjones.co.uk, who do a lot of electrics for caravans have the following on their tow bar electrics page (the first pic is black ...


2

NO, do not try to earth any of the coil(s) on a modern car - you could easily damage any one of several control units. However, you could consider putting a switch "in-line" with the fuel pump feed - much safer and will prevent it starting quite neatly.


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