21

Electric cars do need special maintenance, but they need less maintenance. I don't know about the E-Golf specifically but other electric cars need scheduled maintenance at around 1 year or 18,000 miles. This is on par with many newer cars with extended maintenance schedules, but much less often than your traditional 3 months/3000 miles maintenance schedules (...


20

The "take some of the output force to reuse it as input" can be interpreted as regenerative braking, but the big differences are: Regenerative braking takes power back from the wheels while turbo take power from the engine itself, that would be otherwise wasted. The power of the turbo adds to the normal power of the engine while the power of regenerative ...


18

tl;dr: We do. It's just expensive. One of the differences between electric and chemical energy motors is that the electric systems make it much more convenient to capture and retain energy (e.g., a battery). All you need to do is use induction to create an electric current right there at the wheel while braking. Point that current at that battery and you've ...


17

No, there isn't any equivalent. A turbo is used because combustion engines are inherently inefficient: they convert chemical energy into mechanical energy, using an awkward detour via heat. Unfortunately, heat is pretty much the worst possible way to store energy: by the laws of thermodynamics, you can only convert it to other forms of energy if you also ...


17

regenerative braking This question and answer regarding the subject matter has some very good information in it as well the answer reveals a mathematical paradox with regenerative braking What is regenerative braking and why don't we use it? This Q&A is a bit off your topic but has breadcrumbs regarding recapturing lost energy through a turbo to ...


17

Of course it's possible, but in an ideal electric car, you don't even need a transmission with multiple gears. The electric motor has a much greater range of torque/speed output at its disposal than an internal combustion engine does.


13

There are two power systems on all electric cars (fully electric and hybrids alike). This is in conjunction with the much higher voltage battery packs which normally power the electric motors. The reason for this extra power system is to power things like lights, electronics, and HVAC systems (to name a few). Most hybrid vehicles (and never a fully electric ...


12

No, you cannot. Well, you might be able to, but not in a feasible way in any likely manner. Electric Vehicles commonly have two separate electric circuits. One running at the normal 12V, which ties to all the common electronics that all other types of cars have. Light bulbs, radios, in many cases also a starter motor for the gasoline engine if it in fact ...


11

I'm sure it can be done different ways, but I'll describe the Nissan Leaf, since it is one of the true electric cars on the market today (not a hybrid gas/electric). The Nissan Leaf does not use a typical automatic or manual transmissions. It uses a single speed reduction gear with a final drive ratio of 7.9377. The motor itself can spin at ~10k rpm. This ...


10

Torque in almost all electric machines is a function of current. For permanent magnet machines, torque is roughly proportional to current and for the series-wound machines, torque is roughly proportional to current squared. So if you can get the current in quickly which is easiest at standstill, you will burn rubber.


9

In answer to the question "What is regenerative braking and why don't we use it?", we do. With normal braking, forward momentum of the car is scrubbed off by the brakes by turning them into heat in the brake disc with subsequently dissipates and is lost. With regenerative braking, instead of the movement of the car being lost to the atmosphere as heat, it ...


8

Yes, there are a few Zero Motorcycles have quite a few models that are available for purchase right now. They are up to 67HP and a 197 mile range. Harley Davidson has a model that should be released soon. They are touring the country with them and allowing people to test drive them at the moment while they further develop their technology. I would ...


7

The other answers failed to emphasize an important point: the 12V battery on hybrid cars is not designed to start an engine, being much smaller than typical automotive starter batteries. Thus, it may not have the cranking amps capacity to successfully start the other car. The 12V battery is merely there to provide power for lights and to boot up the computer ...


7

Electric vehicles can "engine" brake by using the drive motors as generators. As they generate electricity they consume the car's potential energy - either from speed or elevation or both. The energy can be used to recharge the battery or dissipated as heat. The changeover between power and regenerative (dynamic) braking is usually handled automatically. So ...


7

No, it won't get damaged. But you also shouldn't let the battery totally empty for long periods. Li-ion batteries are best stored with some charge (normally about 40% is recommended charge level for long term storage per battery university :)) Volvo says that if you press the 'save' button your car will keep reserve charge or charge the batteries from ...


6

Regenerative braking is a system that stores the energy that instead would be lost to heat in the brakes. While these systems sound great they come with a whole host of their own problems. Before even getting into the energy storage and generation the actual service brakes become very complicated. For regenerative braking to work properly the brakes can't ...


6

The anti-lock system already monitors the individual speed of all wheels and reduces braking power of individual wheels when it detects it locking. From there, it is just a small step to the traction control systems, which applies the brake to individual wheels when they start to slip. In addition, motor power can be reduced. The Tesla has this system, ...


6

Since you are talking about, on the base side, an outlet having 120v/20A, I'll assume you are talking about here in the States, as I don't know what's going on with the rest of the world, but voltages and amperages are going to be different elsewhere. I don't know what's going to be standard here for electric vehicle plug-ins, but I believe part of your ...


5

Lots of good answers, but will clarify something for what it is worth: All hybrid cars do have a 12V and a high voltage system. In my Prius (2009, 2003-2009 model), the 12v battery is in the boot. The standard car electrics like computers (all 13 of them) and screens and headlight and indicators and everything runs off the 12v battery. The 12v battery is ...


5

In addition to Asmyldof answer, I would like to Highlight another point. Magnetic braking (motor regenerative/passive braking on an electric car) torque are dependent of the speed. This means that theoretically, this type of brake can never stop a vehicle because as the speed decrease, the maximum braking torque also decrease. This is a bit like the Zeno's ...


5

To expand on @Autistic's answer… There is no need for a transmission with an electric vehicle (assuming that the speed and characteristics of the motor match the application – for applications where this isn't the case electric motors are often coupled with a gearbox to (usually) reduce the output speed of the motor to something usable) because an electric ...


5

The car will charge its battery while driving, e.g. when you brake. This allows the electric motor to augment the diesel engine, reducing overall fuel usage. The result is that the charge state of the battery constantly changes. In other hybrids (Toyota Prius) the control system keeps the battery charge in a range that optimizes battery lifetime (i.e. ...


5

Adding another charging socket would add more weight (slightly), complexity, and cost to each car produced of that model. And given the generally cheap and plentiful availability of power extension cords I doubt it's actually a problem for many people so why go to the effort/expense of doing so?


5

I'm not entirely sure that this question fits the primary purpose of this group BUT I have to say that I've long wondered why electric car manufacturers don't standardise on a battery format and devise some sort of unattended method of battery replacement. I thought something that you drive the car onto and then the battery pack is ejected from underneath ...


5

TL;DR: This idea is old, like OLD (1890s), but so far nobody has been able to set it up in a financially viable way. History The steam car, the internal combustion engine automobile, and the electric car emerged as the main competing technologies in the late 1890s until the 1920s. The concept of exchangeable battery service was first proposed as early ...


5

Let's do the math! Gasoline is 32 MJ / litre, so 60 litres is 1920 MJ, or 533 kWh. However, there's only 25% efficiency in most engines, so this translates to useful 133 kWh. Electric motors are nearly 100% efficient. Lithium ion batteries are 0.1 - 0.265 kWh / kg, so this is 502 kg - 1330 kg of batteries, depending on the exact battery chemistry. I don't ...


4

You could capture the heat from the electric motor, and convert that into more energy using a thermoelectric device. University of Florida research


4

It's not so much that the motors can't brake like mad. It's as you hint at yourself that any auto-mobile that is required to be fully road legal needs two completely separate systems for braking, in case one of them fails. It's why even the most automated gas-fuelled cars still had a hand-brake type system. It originates from the perceived unreliability of ...


4

Yes, they can be. You'll probably need to find a company that refurbishes batteries, there's one that I know of in Australia so I'd say (i.e. assume) that there would be services in your area. If you're a bit handy with electrical work, I've seen some people set up arrays of smaller lithiums to achieve the desired outputs for EV applications. It's not ...


4

Hmmm... The motor has 1500W, which means it draws 31A at 48V at full load. The inrush current can be higher, that's your 40-50A. However, this doesn't mean the motor needs 40-50A to start and 31A to run, it's just the absolute maximum. At lower voltage, it will sink a lower current and have lower power. Remember, a combustion has its maximum power near the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible