11

You absolutely can! I've painted several of my race cars this way, on a limited budget. The looked wonderful, and I usually wrecked them before the paint was an issue. If you prep very well (all automotive paintjobs are 90% prep work, and 10% spraying) you can get outstanding results. You do need to have some painting experience, even with a rattlecan. ...


8

Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately, depending on your viewpoint), that is not a broken lug nut, but the nut which is formed into the plastic hub cap. Take the hub cap off and you'll see the lug nuts. If you notice, there are seven lugs on the hub cap. When you take that off, there will be eight lugs on the wheel itself. This is a standard hub cap for the ...


3

Can you do it? Yes. Will you ever lose your vehicle in a car park? No. Not in a million years. Is it a good idea? Well, you're going to do the prep yourself anyway. Strip and prep to a rolling chassis, and get a quote from a local paint shop for a blow-over in the original color (or close to it). It may be surprisingly close in price to the cost of the ...


3

The air conditioner on this vehicle uses a vacuum powered HVAC controls. A leak anywhere in the vacuum system can cause this symptom. One way to test for leaks is to apply low pressure air (10psi) into the system and listen for leaks. Leaks at the vacuum reservoir are common. So is the line to the air recirculation valve because it is close to the passengers ...


2

Well, it turns out that the 1996 Ford E350 doesn't have a Mass Air Flow sensor - hence the trouble finding it :-) Instead, it has a MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor, which looks like this: And can be found here: Thanks for your help with this!


2

It should be on or near the air cleaner assembly. It looks like a square thing with a 60 pin connector on it http://www.ford-trucks.com/how-tos/a/ford-f150-f250-how-to-clean-a-faulty-mass-airflow-sensor-361730


2

If you look at your engine you will see that in 1974 almost all emission controls were connected to or controlled by a vacuum hose. As the hose ages it cracks and causes vacuum leaks. Many of the components had no vacuum applied until the engine was warm and above idle speed. This can result in good idle and performance cold but a vacuum leak and poor ...


1

The last time I saw a Ford E350 for a coolant leak, I found the hoses crimped at lines at the back of the engine, easily accessible with the doghouse off (literally, closest thing to you as you sit in the driver's floor). You would have to cut the hoses and plug those. You'll have to pull the front seats out first. Don't cut the A/C lines.


1

It really depends, but most of the time you won't get enough oil off of the valve cover to start a fire. You're right, there will be a lot of smoke. Before you start it, you should try and clean off as much as possible. This will limit the amount of smoke which is produced. Also, check the oil to ensure there's enough (actually, if it's been sitting over the ...


1

Using a thicker oil will not solve the problem, you'll just cause van to get worse gas mileage. The 5.4 engines are known to use a bit of oil, so you are in good company. Something you can try to do is change out the PCV or at the very minimum, clean the one you have to ensure you're not sucking up oil through the thing. Sometimes they get a little bit ...


1

90% of a good paint job is in the body work. Unless the body work is done flawlessly you will see every ding. Just about anyone a can paint a car it's the body work that counts. I would go with a white color paint, it hides the more. The paint should last a few years. You maybe be better off doing the body work yourself (flawlessly) and then getting a paint ...


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