4

Since the condenser (capacitor) is connected in parallel to the point's contacts, when the points open the condenser then allows a small amount of current to briefly continue flowing through the capacitor until it is fully charged, therefore allowing the contacts to open fully without arcing. Once current into the primary coil stops flowing the magnetic ...


4

When the throttle body becomes a little worn, it is possible for the butterfly valve to close too much for a steady idle engine speed. The ECM then tries to compensate by opening the IAC more than it is designed to under normal conditions. This can cause stalling and unsteady idle. There will be a screw on the throttle body that allows adjustment of ...


4

Your CPS code won't explain the hunting idle; the symptoms point to a lean air-fuel mixture: it doesn't stutter at low idle with the engine cold because the fuel management is designed to enrich the AFR while the engine is warming up (aka cold-start enrichment) turning the AC on helps because it induces an additional load on the engine, which makes it ...


2

There is a huge collector interest in 1960s American stuff. Hence there are lots of aftermarket parts available of variable quality. Most people don't drive their classic everyday for reasons like fuel cost and wanting to keep mileage low. In the case of GM and its Australian cousin Holden there are cheap and expensive distributors to choose from. The cheap ...


2

No, it does not need to be at the no 1 position, but that is an easy way to make sure it goes back correctly. The distributor can be corroded so it won’t move - some freeing juice and working it back and forth may be successful.


2

"So if the cap is basically OK, but the contact points are just worn down and need to be replaced, is that possible?" Short answer: Maybe. Many plastic caps are molded around the contact pins. This would make then nearly impossible to remove without damaging the cap. Each cap being different, there is no definitive answer. Some caps may have this feature, ...


2

It is definitely Electronic, here is the diagram for the 4 cylinder, v6 is similar. Points started phasing out in the mid 1970's.


2

Best option is to remove spark plug from #1 cylinder and turn over the engine while your finger is in the spark plug hole, when you feel the compression pushing your finger out that is the compression stroke, now continue to turn the engine slowly until the mark lines up on 0 degrees on the timing cover, now set the distributor in aligning the rotor with the ...


1

The duplication, or more, of points in distributors was to avoid contact bounce. The coil really needs a single change of state “closed to open” to generate the spark and as rpm rises the number of contacts needed causes the contacts to bounce open as they close changing the current flow through the coil. Having 2 sets halves the number of close/open each ...


1

Well the play in both causes the timing to drift between the two banks when there are two distributors. A single distributor with either one or two sets of points is easier to time - especially if you go for an optronic ignition upgrade.


1

Normal practice is to replace points, "condenser", rotor and wire , cap is secondary. I used to replace these parts about every 25,000 miles when I had them. That is, you have not replaced 3 of the most important ignition items. I had a 70's VW that would not start when cold because the enrichment or choke injector failed.


1

I would disconnect the supply to the coil, but it does depend on which coil / ignition system is fitted. If it is the older type non electronic then it will be fine. However any of the electronic types can suffer damage sometimes but not always. After building an engine I would spin it without plugs and the coil disconnected to get the oil circulated and ...


1

If the crank and cam are both aligned , it is TDC firing. While the crank rotates twice and can be either TDC firing or exhaust , the cam only rotates once and is at TDC firing every time its mark is aligned with the crank mark .


1

The “standard” or at least early versions of ballasted coil ignition systems had a resistor that dropped the voltage supplied to the coil to 6v or 9v so a 6 or 9v coil was used. On starting, that resistor was by-passed so the coil was supplied with 12v, basically to help provide a better spark when the battery was under load from the starter. The battery ...


1

So, what I have done in the past is to support the cap then drill out or to a depth the old pin. Tap it to match the new pins you have made and fit them - usually with a strong loctite or equivalent.


1

As mentioned there may likely be a shaft seal issue, however I would also check engine breathers etc as the internal pressure may be too high forcing oil to weap through the weakest seal.


1

Yes you can turn the crankshaft via its pulley. But this is probably easier. If you want to turn the crankshaft by hand you can use a socket with a long handle / breaker bar on it to "Tighten" the bolt on the end of the engine crankshaft. Usually that bolt holds the harmonic dampener. Be careful here as if the crankshaft gets stiff you might exceed install ...


1

My father has a '73 thing and has gone back and forth between electronic and points. It APPEARS to be electronic. It looks like there is a black box on the back of the dist with a black and red wire coming out. The basic way to tell is to pop of the dist cap, remove the rotor, remove the disc. Underneath you will either see the electronic pickup or ...


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