17

Both that disc and pad look perfectly normal to me, although I can't see from the photo how much material is left on the pad - but with only 25k on the clock I would expect them to have plenty of life left. You will always get light corrosion on the discs when the vehicle has been sitting for a while (as little as overnight if the weather is damp, a few ...


8

I'm going to disagree with my esteemed colleague about whether they need to be replaced. While there is no profile view to really tell the depth of what is left of the pad, it looks to me as though it's on its last legs. In the pad photo, if you look at the left side of the pad (by your fingers), it looks as though you can see metal wear, as though the pad's ...


5

If your caliper has any brake fluid coming out of it, it's time to rebuild/replace the caliper. There should be absolutely no fluid loss anywhere in your braking system. If it is leaking at the caliper, not only is the caliper failing, but if the brake fluid gets on the rotor/pads, it won't provide much in the way of stopping, either. This is a huge safety ...


3

I always put a very thin coat of copper grease on the mating surfaces and also on the mating surface between the rotor and the alloy wheel. Only a small amount is needed and you want to make sure that there isn’t too much that can run onto the rotor friction area even when hot.


3

Your picture does not show enough detail, but I think that the item you call the seal is actually the rubber dust cover and the pressure seals are further back on the piston. Also you should be able to push the pistons back flush with the body - take care some pistons need to be rotated either clockwise or anticlock due to the mechanism inside, the pistons ...


2

More than likely it's corrosion on the disk surface. Once it and all the dust from it is gone, the brakes should be pretty much normal, unless there is serious pitting or gouging from the corrosion. You could pull your brakes apart and clean the surfaces of both the rotor and the pads. To do this, use a wire wheel brush (the type which goes on a drill; I'd ...


2

From your pictures I can see the outer ~10mm ring of rust on the brake rotor. A small ring of rust is normal, but if you look at the brake pad you can see the arc ~8mm from the outer edge of the pad. This arc is from the pad riding on that thick ring of rust on the rotor. The shop was right to suggest replacement. You also said corrosion on the inside of the ...


2

Some vehicles do not use clips for brake pads. Most do. Yours obviously requires them because they are in the manual. Many economy pad sets from the parts store do not include the clips. Get premium pads. They usually include the clips. If not, purchase the front brake hardware kit. The clips will be in that. Clips are important because they allow the pads ...


2

Based on the reference to adjusting the clutch, consider that if the clutch is not fully disengaged, the power produced by the engine will not be transmitted to the rear wheel in an efficient manner. Some of the power will be absorbed by the partially-engaged clutch material (similar to brake pad material) and eventually will wear away to the point of ...


2

A rear wheel, connected to the drive train, and in neutral will spin like that. There are a lot of dragging forces acting on the rear wheel and it will not spin freely. I can't hear from your video if the brake caliper is dragging but the behaviour of that wheel looks to be entirely normal.


1

It could be the brake booster or the check valve. Start the truck, pump the brakes. If the are still locked after you release the pedal disconnect the vacuum hose to the booster. If the brakes release the check valve is bad. If the brakes are still locked pull the pedal up by hand or foot. If the brakes release the booster is bad.


1

The brake calipers is a simple hydraulic pistons system, with the rubber rings. Replace the rubber seals it will do your job. Also check for any leaks from bleeder screws.


1

Once you have had the wheels balanced, and eliminated warped rotors, any remaining wobbles in the front end can usually be attributed to bushings, and there are a fair number of them: Tie Rod bushings, Balljoints, these are the ends of the steering rack that attach to the wheel spindle/knuckle. Steering Rack Bushings (holding the steering rack to the body) ...


1

Got to Friday night and went online to a website called fixmycar.com and entered my details and issue with the car. Got a few quotes and the next morning a mechanic phoned me up and told me he could diagnose the problem for £50 but parts and labour would be extra. Plus he'd come to me. So arranged a time that suited us both and he met me at work at 21:20 on ...


1

What I'd be looking for would be even wear across the pad... that is the same amount of pad material thickness on all sides and the face being flat and no chunks missing. Importantly the wear on the pad on one side should equal the wear on the pad from the other side. If the wear is uneven across a pad or different between the pads then you will need to have ...


1

Having lived for many years in the northern states that love to use so much salt that even the road furniture and bridges rot away at scary speeds, I've seen a lot of corrosion issues with brakes. Probably the worst place for corrosion is the pad backing material, which can tilt the pad relative to the piston, as can corrosion on the corresponding outer ...


1

The area of corrosion the shop needs to worry about is the area between brake pad backing plate and friction material. If corrosion gets between these safety-critical components, it can cause the friction material to delaminate. When this happens, the friction material could separate causing a reduction in braking surface. This will lead to longer than ...


1

It sounds as though the entire system may not be bled properly. The vacuum booster is fighting with the spongy feel of trapped air. I would start with a thorough bleed, including the ABS activation (which always seems important on Chevys) and see if the problem changes.


1

If the vehicle has power-assisted brakes, the boost unit (vacuum or hydraulic) may not be operating. Sounds like your leg is taking the place of the power-assist. Check vacuum hose to power brake unit. Also, if either the front or rear set of brake calipers has seized up you are functioning with only front or rear brakes. Try low speed panic braking to a ...


1

As another user mentioned, you will need to be absolutely sure that fluid isnt leaking from any other location at all. If the hose burst caused the current cylinder to empty out, you will want to try a bench bleed, also as suggested, followed by rechecking all of the calipers for air. To check for fluid in the booster, you could try a wire hanger, or perhaps ...


1

If the master cylinder is leaking internally, some fluid pushes past the piston rather than pushing fluid through the brake lines (and then to the calipers). If you're not losing fluid, I'd suggest the brake master cylinder. Easiest way to test it is to start the car and press firmly - but not quickly - on the pedal, and hold pressure. If it's bad, the ...


1

I suspect that one of the inboard pads is worn down to the point that it is metal to metal against the rotor. Please stop driving the vehicle until the source of the noise is identified and repaired.


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