12

The difference comes down to the driver. While automatic racing gearboxes can beat a driver when it comes to performance, for the type of vehicle you describe, a manual can perform significantly higher than an automatic if the driver knows how to use it. But then if you really wanted high acceleration you would choose a different car. Maintenance is much ...


6

It is not strictly the increase in engine RPM that causes a vehicle to accelerate. Newton's 2nd law of motion states: In an inertial reference frame, the sum of the forces F on an object is equal to the mass m of that object multiplied by the acceleration a of the object: F = ma. In other words, the engine, via the transmission puts a force (in the form ...


6

From experience, my old Mazda 323-C Auto could be bump started at a speed of around 34mph (which is far too fast to push!). This was a traditional type auto box so I don't know how it would differ for something with a CVT / DSG gearbox. I used to carry jump leads in the boot of this car as the most effective way to starting any car but certainly an ...


5

Automatic transmissions originally had a feature that allowed push starting, a rear pump in addition to the front pump. If the car was rolling the rear pump would provide pressure even if the engine was not running. Some speed was required 15 to as much 30mph recommended for some makes to transmit enough torque through the torque converter to turn the engine ...


5

I will answer the question in simple terms. Acceleration: CVT Does not have a gears and are usually single speed, so if you want to abruptly accelerate the CVT will not be as efficient as a manual transmission, the most common problem of CVT is the rubber-band effect where you push the accelerator and after a pause and acceleration increases suddenly. Ergo, ...


4

A slight RPM increase when shifting from "D" to neutral is normal. The reason for this is the engaged transmission is putting a slight load on the engine and slowing it down. In neutral the engine is doing less work because it is not trying to turn the drivetrain.


4

I believe you can do it with a traditional torque converter. I've done it. It's not smart. Push by your buddy, no. Push with another vehicle, yes - but as the other Steve M suggests you'll need the high side of 25-35mph to maybe make this happen. Without the tranny fluid pump driven, you won't get TC proper fill, BUT there's usually enough residual ...


4

I finally dit it. I tried the penetrating fluid but with no avail. I figured I needed more torque, but did not want to damage another ratchet. So I went ahead and welded the broken rachet head and also welded a 2 foot long tube to the end of the old ratchet. With this makeshift breaker bar I managed to apply enough torque to loosen the bold.


4

Don't use DW-1! ATF DW-1 did replace the old Z1 fluid - but only for conventional automatics. For the CVT boxes Honda now produce their own CVT Fluid (Honda Part# 0826099905HE) which should be used instead - the first generation CVT boxes in particular are known to be a bit touchy about fluid and I've heard anecdotal reports of issues when using non-Honda ...


3

My 2013 Subaru Impreza has a CVT as well. It also takes longer than a conventional automatic transmission to go into reverse. I was told that it's just the nature of CVTs.


2

Two things: Ensure you are trying to turn it the right way. (ie: righty tighty [clockwise] lefty loosey [counter-clockwise]) Seeing as how the vehicle is upside down to you (since you are underneath), it's easy to get turned around and applying torque in the wrong direction. Put your combination wrench back on the nut and hit the open end with a hammer (in ...


2

I assume you have tried to spray loads of penetrating fluid on it? Otherwise, from the sound of it, I wouldn't count on getting the bolt out without heat so at this point it would be best to drop the whole oilpan so you can work on it separately. It will be messy and sucks to do but like you said it shouldn't be done with oil in there.


2

I'm not sure this is a simple as # number fluid changes to get to x dilution factor. If so M1V1 = M2V2 is what you would be looking for which looks to be around 140L worth of oil changes. It's my understanding that this transmission is expecting an actual flush procedure where either the transmission pump is forcing the old fluid out or there's a ...


2

Considering how finicky CVT's can be, and how expensive they are to replaced, I would follow the manufacturer recommended service intervals and fluid types. From what I've read, most manufacturers recommend changing CVT fluid every 30k miles or 24 months. You should double check with your owners manual or dealership service department for the correct fluid ...


2

The mechanic disassembled the gearbox and there was a minor damage in a piston which controls CVT pulleys. When the piston was replaced, the problem got resolved.


2

As it has been said before, the (continuous) changing of the (infinite) "gears" in CVT is what makes it accelerate. Here's a video that explains visually the CVT. The control unit will request a certain torque from the engine (for speed or economy) while the acceleration is achieved with the variation of the ratios in the actual CVT. The two pulleys will ...


2

Acceleration is primarily due to the changing ratio of the CVT (continuously variable transmission). Think of it as the inverse of the usually set up where you have a transmission with a number of fixed ratios and continuously variable input speed (RPM). With the CVT the engine speed can be held (relatively) constant at an optimal value - best economy, best ...


2

As long as you don't exceed the maximum speed (revs) of the engine you should be ok. If you do, then forces acting in the transmission can exceed design limits maybe causing damage.


2

There could be. The CVT transmission is a common issue with most Nissan vehicles as the chain in the transmission becomes weak and goes out. I've had it happen before. What I noticed the transmission do was make a wining noise and a hesitation on shifting and acceleration. Before I took my transmission in I noticed fairly higher RPMs before shifts, ...


2

My educated guess is its just getting up there in age and is starting to slip due to the added stress of having to go up hill. This would explain why it doesn't slip downhill as it is just coasting.


2

A car that does most of its driving will benefit from a "harder" drive occasionally... Known as an "Italian service" by some. My car has over 200K km's on it and it always runs much better after a long motorway run (800km at 120km/h...) The normal home to work and back tends to allow the turbo to build up carbon... So, a good run once in a while will help ...


1

You are absolutely correct about wearing your brake pads. You need to downshift. My car, a 2016 Toyota RAV4 hybrid too has S position even though it has CVT. The S position has 6 simulated gears. You move to the S position laterally from the D position. Then, in the S position, you push the shifter forwards or backwards to upshift and downshift, ...


1

Your car has a CVT gear box, that stands for Continuously Variable Transmission. A CVT constantly changes gear ratios as you drive to maintain a continuous engine rpm, you won't feel gear changes because there are no gears to change. There's nothing wrong, it's how it's meant to work.


1

If you mean that you have to push the gas pedal down more than half way, even when the wheel is completely fully turned, bring the vehicle to a dealer for repair. That is not normal. How many miles do you have on it? Looks like your warranty is 6yrs/60k miles. Have you had any software updates performed on the vehicle?


1

In the same car, fuel efficiency will be better with the CVT: a CVT can keep the engine near its optimum rev range better than a 4-speed automatic. an automatic has higher power losses due to the torque converter. A torque converter is locked up when possible, but when it's open it causes noticeable power losses (up to 20% in bad cases). In tests where ...


1

As transmissions have become more and more computer controlled, many transmissions will not engage into a different direction unless the vehicle is stopped or more accurately, until the computer thinks the car is stopped. I can't say exactly which cars have the engagement inhibit programmed in, but it has become more common over the past ten years. In the ...


1

Honda vehicles in general can be very VERY particular as to what you can and cannot put into them. Going as far as to say it requires it's own power steering fluid. CVTs are specially designed to use CVT transmission fluid. They use different components altogether to work instead of using gears like a traditional automatic would. Usually the wrong fluid can ...


1

Most videos that explain CVT explain very well WHAT they do, but are always more than foggy on HOW a CVT changes ratios. I've found this video that drops a few keywords relevant to HOW the CVT moves clutches and sheaves, such as "flyweights," "helix" and "spring tension." Basically, the input and output shafts use these flyweights, springs and helices to ...


1

I have the same vehicle in NZ (Demio Jap import).... the only people I found to assist were Kaspa Transmissions in Silverdale, Auckland; no one else could seem to be able find the correct fluid. I've had them flush and change the oil/fluid twice, once when I first bought it and again after around 50,000kms. I don't know if this is the correct interval or ...


1

An impact wrench - even an electric - can do wonderful things. I just had a 10mm with a torx head that I struggled with all afternoon. It just wouldn't come, and got to where the torx teeth were pretty close to stripped out. My brother brought over his impact, and it came off in 10 secs. I have seen the light.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible