24

Grinding a crankshaft is a process of removing material from the journals in an effort to refurbish and reuse an expensive, yet vital component of an engine. It is usually done during the process of rebuilding an engine when needed, but also has some performance aspects which come along with the process. Let's first off describe the anatomy of a crankshaft....


22

Ok, let's start from the same picture so we're on the same page: These engines are four stroke engines, which means the piston goes up and down a total of 4 times, twice up, and twice down for each cycle. So to answer your questions: Of course I do realize it stands for revolutions per minute, but revolutions of what? As you stated later, it's ...


15

A flywheel serves four main purposes (in most vehicles): It provides mass for rotational inertia to keep the engine in motion It is specifically weighted to provide balance for the crankshaft It provides a means to get the engine started (starter ring) It provides a connection for power transfer between the engine and transmission (along with the clutch it ...


11

Crank shaft has a pulley or a sprocket at the front end, which turns a cam shaft/shafts through a cam chain or cam belt (timing belt). 1 turn of a cam shaft = 2 turns of a crank shaft. At the other end of a crank shaft is a flywheel which being turned by a starter motor for a start. Crank shaft is the first shaft in the whole engine which turns everything ...


10

This is addition to Paulster's answer. Here's an animation The disc in Grey is the flywheel Wikipedia provides a good general outline - A flywheel is a rotating mechanical device that is used to store rotational energy. ... - Providing continuous energy when the energy source is discontinuous. For example, flywheels are used in reciprocating engines ...


10

A crankshaft wears with use. After a lot of miles, the play between shaft and bearing becomes too much. The more play, the lower the oil pressure, the worse the lubrication. And then it wears out even faster. You can grind a crankshaft, camshaft, or any shaft to make it round again when it's worn out. You replace the bearings with thicker/oversize ones, so ...


8

tl dr: You possibly could, but why not just do it the right way? Get the right tools for the job and do it right from the get go. This way you won't have to worry about anything falling off while driving down the road. First, get the Honda hub socket which Lisle makes. You can get it (or a close facsimile) just about anywhere. It's Lisle PN: 77260 and ...


7

This is compression of air working against you Over the course of two crank revolutions for your Camry you have 4 cylinders compressing air and fuel. When you see the engine get to a point of rotation and it rotates backward a bit after releasing the starter, that's air acting as a spring and resisting. If you take your sparkplugs out of the engine it ...


7

The two primary bearing types found on a crankshaft are roller bearings and plain bearings located on the main journals of a crankshaft. There are two types of journals on a crankshaft. Main Journal - Where the crankshaft main bearings would be located Rod/Offset Journal - Where the connecting rod bearings would be located Crankshaft Components Image ...


7

I see two possibilities: He just putted some leak-stop additive in the engine oil. That is some additive that is intended to stop an seal leak by miraculously thickening the oil around the seal area and not in the oil channels (where it needs to flow unobstructed). Needless to say that this additives most of the time do an awful job. The crankshaft seal got ...


7

For a four-stroke engine you need to rotate 2 turns of the crankshaft to get to the same position.


6

Crank Throw A synonym to a crank throw is a crank pin. Which is a an offset journal on the crank. If the offset journal shares a connecting rod with another cylinder you would say the crank-pin has one throw for the two cylinders. The F1 V6 engines are considered 3 throw engines. The off set journal is shared by two connecting rods. IF the described ...


6

There are two basic usages for the term "crank throw". Both have to do with the crankshaft: The crank throw is a measure of the distance from the center-line of the main journal to the center-line of the rod journal. This distance could be considered the radius of the crank arm. Twice this measurement should give you the stroke of an engine. Due to the ...


6

There are a few different ways I can think of to do this: If the vehicle has a manual shift transmission, put the transmission into the highest gear, then set the parking brake. The torque provided through the drivetrain will be more than enough to counteract the torque put on the crank hub bolt. If it's a front wheel drive, have someone stand on the brake ...


6

Crack it loose and then have them re-tighten to 70 lbs, this way you can remove it when you get home without risking it coming loose during the drive.


6

First, it's not spun on a lathe to make it round again, at least not the typical machine lathe you'd think of. It's a machine which has a huge grinding wheel, thus the reason we call it grinding a crank. The setup looks something like this: (Sorry for the small image.) In the image, you can see the crankshaft is setup on a machine. In the back, there is ...


5

Either use the tool probably with a crescent wrench since there is not much space unless you have the fans out and whatnot. Or get a remote starter like this one. Hook it up to the positive battery terminal and the positive terminal on the starter, then blip it until the valves you need to clean are closed. Other things I can think of: Possibly spinning ...


5

It's fine I did a similar job on a 2003 model recently. I kid car. Luckily, I didn't have any bent valves to deal with. Turning the engine over with the head off and the car in gear won't hurt anything. I know the exact feeling of elasticity you are talking about if you have the car in gear. I am assuming you had the front wheels on the ground when you ...


5

The only curved bore designs I am aware of are toroidal I have been unable to find a match to the drawing, not even close. I took a hard look at steam engines as well. Here is an example of a toroidal design Here is a modern mock up of a similar design.


5

An old trick for this is to remove a spark plug, then feed a length of string into the cylinder through the spark plug hole, leaving enough string hanging out to pull it all out when done. The string won't compress, so stops the motor from turning, allowing you to tighten the crankshaft bolt. When you're done, remove the string by pulling it back out the ...


5

There is a way to do it. You put a wrench on the pulley bolt and block the other end against the floor or the frame. Then you use the starter motor to turn the engine (DO NOT START IT, JUST TURN IT) for at most one or two revolutions of the crank. Just enough to break the bolt loose. A couple of things to watch out for: Be sure the wrench is setup ...


5

Yes, put it in the highest gear you can put it into if you have a manual transmission. This gives the greatest amount of resistance to the torque you'll put on the crank shaft bolt. At the same time, put your parking brake on for even better holding power. This should not cause any issue with the engine or drive train. I say this because in most cases the ...


5

You need to confirm that timing is OK This forum thread looks to be talking about the same engine as what you have (3.4 L, 5 chains). According to the post, this is what you'll have to do: rotate the engine to TDC for Bank 1 (let's hope your 150° of freedom allows for this) check that the timing notches on the cams are parallel to the cylinder head (from ...


5

The answer is one of: Friction For example, rod, main, balance or intermediate shaft, and/or cam bearings, oil or water pump, or piston rings are too tight. Re-assembly of dry clean components without using assembly lubricant will also cause excess friction. Compression Air pressure resisting movement. Removing spark plugs will help here (in this case, ...


4

Many times in the past I've used an RTV called Right Stuff. It is very thick and tacky. Degrease everything then apply the RTV to the block surface and a little to the seal all the way around. Pound the seal in to the correct depth. Allow to set overnight. This solution has the lowest risk of screwing anything up. If the repair doesn't hold then the RTV ...


4

You take the nominal diameter of the existing bearing and using the result of the plastigauge add / subtract to get to the diameter you need, then that gives you the amount of over or undersize bearing you should source.


4

Realistically, if your rod journals are worn, you'll need to take it to the machine shop to have the crankshaft inspected and reground if it can be done. The machinist (or shop) will then figure out if the crankshaft is serviceable. If it isn't, you'll need to get a new one (or a refurbished replacement). If it can be ground and made serviceable, your ...


4

It is most probably possible to change crank and bearings, but to change the con-rod the piston has to come out so the head has to come off.


4

No, this will not cause any damage. Cars have the engines running while they are in park. Park is a selection in the ´box that allows the fluid to circulate without providing any drive to the wheels.


3

The gouge probably came from somebody removing the seal with a screwdriver or pick. Not a big deal and very common. The fact that the seal was leaking does not mean that the gouge is causing it. Those seals expand very well and the OEM Subaru seals are really good. I would lightly (very lightly) sand the gouge with a very fine sandpaper. Then I would ...


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