12

Is the crankshaft sensor superfluous? The following excerpt from Probst's "Bosch Fuel Injection & Engine Management" book corroborates vini_i's first point: Taking RPM and TDC timing sinals from the crankshaft avoids inaccuracies from gear-lash or belt-drive such as when rpm and timing are determined in a camshaft-driven distibutor... So in ...


12

The biggest reason is the need for misfire detection. The best way to tell if the crank shaft is speeding up and slowing down more than it is supposed to is to directly measure its speed. This is how misfires are detected. It is because the timing chain or timing belt always has a little give and this can obscure the movement of the crankshaft from the ...


11

These two sensors are not always used for the same purpose. Obviously, reading each cam and crank shaft position gives more granular information to the computer for tuning of the engine. According to Standard (manufacture of automotive engine management components); The Camshaft sensor determines which cylinder is firing to establish injector ...


5

I know from working on Mazdas that several reasons are: the signal from one can be used to verify the signal from the other so an engine code can be thrown if the belt slips a tooth. For example, 96-97 BP blocks have a 4 tooth crank sensor with a magnetic pickup- it just provides the ECU a verification that everything is aligned correctly but can't be used ...


4

Sounds strange. I can understand that the absence of a crank position sensor signal can prevent the engine from starting (the ECU won't allow the car to run without it). The lack of signal could also prevent the fuel pump relay from activating and priming the fuel lines. But I'm struggling to buy that a bad crank position sensor would result in physical ...


3

The clue is probably in the manufacturer you picked. Honda is famous for V-TEC which is a method whereby the camshaft advance profile can be changed depending on engine RPM. I assume this would mean a crank and cam position sensor would both be required?


2

The sensors feed the computer with which numerous other sensor inputs control cylinder firing and fuel to air mixes. A loss of signal or an incorrect one from a cam/crank sensor causes immediate engine shutdown - hopefully before damage is done. There are two types of engines I know of. 1- Interference type: If timing belt breaks, valves may hit pistons ...


2

It somewhat depends on what the crank position information is used for. 60 would be better than 36, as the former only has 10 degrees of resolution, while the latter "60 tooth" improves this to 6 degrees. Ultimately the ECU will probably use cam position for injection and ignition, so it may not matter. A good aftermarket ECU will allow you to use either ...


2

Because the distributor is driven directly from the crankshaft at half-speed. This means the sensor is picking up a "slower" signal and either way it gives the ecu the information needed. Other engines use a sensor based on the flywheel rotation and the signal needs to be divided by 2, done in the ecu.


1

Currently, the harmonic balancer/crank pulley is still off, could that cause the CPS not to detect the location of the crank? Er, yes. The Crank Position Sensor is a hall effect device and it generally reads off a tooth or some other indicator on the balancer (possibly a small magnet?) disclaimer: my note here is generic in nature... and not specific to ...


1

A 3 wire CKP sensor would produce a 5v square wave. A 2 wire CKP sensor produces a AC sine wave. Even if you managed to wire the 2 wire sensor to the 3 wire harness the car wouldn't start. You would have to swap the tone wheel if they're different.


1

So took it to the mechanic indeed it needed a new crankshaft position sensor, after that was fixed they also found out one of the pistons were gone. Car is no longer driveable. There is a metal banging sound in the engine.


1

You can test the sensor with a multimeter. (On the sensor) find the ground and the signal wire usually black (ground) blue (signal) put your multimeter to D.C. volts and see if you're getting voltage. Hopefully this helps.


1

Get an OBD2 reader (compatible to your vehicle) and check the codes - it will tell you what is at fault.


1

P0726 fault code can be caused by: A failed engine input speed sensor A failed transmission output speed sensor A short or open in the wiring harness to one of the sensors A loose connection to one of the sensors A faulty crankshaft position sensor A faulty shift solenoid Dirty, contaminated or low transmission fluid


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