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I'd suggest there's credence for all of these Your fuel pump overheating if it runs dry Unbeknownst to most, the fuel in the tank cools the fuel pump in most vehicles. The pump sits in a bath of fuel for just this reason. Seems counter intuitive you'd stick an electrical device into something as flammable as gasoline, but it works just fine because ...


14

tl dr: Corrosion (once cleaned) is not a huge issue. It is just typical corrosion on the battery terminal. See this image: (NOTE: This is a 6V battery, but the same principles apply.) The blueish color you see is hydrated copper sulfate. When acid vapors escape from the battery, it can cause a reaction with any copper which may be in the terminal. The ...


11

Though each car is different, yes, they may tend to rust faster in coastal areas. This is even true for newer models. Newer models may resist corrosion (rust) better than older ones, but they are still susceptible. Anything that is prone to corrosion is going to be at a higher risk in coastal areas. Sea water gets aerosolized, which creates airborne salt ...


6

For rust removal... my personal favorite technique involves a lot of distilled white vinegar and a green "scrunge" (like a 3M scrubbing pad) or a pad of steel wool. By "a lot" of vinegar, I mean never allow the surface to get dry - always keep it wet with vinegar or it'll "flash rust" while you work. This generally involves working only a fairly small area (...


6

So is there any point of spending money to buy special cleaner or using coke or baking soda when it should be possible just to clean it with plain water? If you have to clean your battery terminals right now, you have to use the tools available to you. You're going to want to be mindful of these facts: The corrosion deposits can be obnoxious to remove....


5

Corrosion is a result of many things, from normal natural processes to contact with leaked chemicals. If anything I'd also say its more likely that the cracked cable connector is the result of heavy corrosion. And no, corrosion does not necessarily imply battery leakage, a certain amount of corrosion over time should be expected and chalked off to normal ...


5

In general silicone gease applied to the parts before and after assembly is a good way to go. It will be pushed out of the way where you have tight metal to metal contact so it won't cause electrical connection problems. It won't crack up if things move slightly and it won't stop you dismantling and reassembling things if you need to.


5

Background Yes it's harmful. It is lead sulphate. It is toxic to ingest and breath. It is especially toxic to children, as you would imagine regular lead to be. It's not miscible in water but baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) neutralizes that acidic portion of the compound. The remnant compound of that reaction would be H2O and some CO. Action Use ...


4

The potential loss of air pressure is only going to happen if you have corrosion in the area where the tyre bead seats against the wheel, not if you have surface corrosion on the outside. If the corrosion on the outside is causing air loss, the wheel is toast, but the corrosion you have on your wheel doesn't look like it's anywhere near this bad. That said, ...


4

Thanks for all the help! It turned out that when I got my battery tested and they said it was "good" they were reading it after the battery had been charged from driving it. I had it tested again this morning and it was in fact a bad battery.


4

If there is no structural damage, you should be able to take a wire brush or angle grinder with a wire brush attachment and clean the affected area, then using the Hammerite, paint the surface to prevent further damage. I'm assuming Hammerite is like our POR15 here in the States. (The Hammerite website really isn't clear on what it actually does, other than ...


3

Usually this is either one of two things: 1) the soap used was not suitable - may have had a bleach or some other chemical which may have attacked the aluminium surface, 2) these are just simple deposits left on the surface by impurities in the water. You should clean it again and see whether the surface itself has been damaged - if it has you need to get ...


3

On negative ground vehicles (virtually all cars now), the reason you should remove the negative side first is so that if your wrench is touching the neg terminal, and it makes contact with the body/engine/frame/etc, then it is safe because the neg terminal is all ready connected to those. However, if you try to remove the positive first and you wrench makes ...


3

The sills are a vital structural part of a unibody chassis, they provide strength and rigidity which is important in the event of an accident, this is why it's been flagged up in the MOT. Without a photo, its hard to tell how bad it is, but even with a photo, what you can see is normally the tip of the iceberg. Upload one and you might get more specific ...


3

It's always good to oil the underneath regardless if there is salt on the roads or not. You will preserve the metal and increase the life of your vehicle. Once rust starts, it spreads like cancer. That being said, I would wash the underside and then get it undercoated. They should be washing the vehicle before they spray.


3

So I've thought about this question for a long time now and finally decided to answer. If you really want to keep the rust at bay, then you are definitely going to need to apply a product designed to do so before applying any cover-up paint. I believe that a rust converter product is the best option. Take a look at products like Corroseal Rust Converter ...


3

This goes straight back to Ohms Law as the corrosion is effectively adding a resistor into the starter circuit this reducing the amount of current the starter motor can physically draw. Starting the engine is the most intensive duty your cars electrical system has to perform. A this smear of grease on the battery terminals following a good clean should ...


3

The part image in the link shows three wires: green, white and black. Combining the image with this blogpost, which explains how to hardwire the 240 taillights, the green/blue is a signal wire for the turn indicator, black is ground. White is purportedly not used: Options at your disposal Source the connector pair and solder/crimp them in place Hardwire ...


3

Here's some quick art work to help you figure things out: The red circled area is where the negative terminal is at. Specifically the green arrow is pointing at it. You should be able to loosen the nut at the red arrow to gain access to the post to get the clamp off of it. As for what you can touch and what you cannot, this really isn't a problem, as you ...


3

I use aluminum foil and Turtle Wax chrome polish on my Harley. The aluminum foil is softer than the steel wool and will not scratch the chrome and at the same time adds a aluminum coating to the rust spots making it have a sealed finish. I also apply the Turtle Wax chrome polish to the aluminum foil so it polishes as it cleans the rust off. Make sure you let ...


3

Your fuel pump overheating if it runs dry This is indeed a concern, as with all other fluids in the car. Most car fluids serve dual purposes-- cooling as well as lubrication. You're not supposed to run low on anything. More volume provides more dissipation of heat. Seals also start to dry out and crack when dehydrated. This is a concern when storing a car ...


3

Half full seems way over the top. I normally refuel somewhere between 1/4 and shortly after the low-fuel warning coming on. If I were out in the back of beyond I would always make sure I had plenty of fuel to reach the next filling station. I have heard (also had disputed) that if a diesel car were ever to completely run dry the resulting lack of ...


2

I would have thought it'd be fine to run to a nearby town to clean it - although if everyone is doing so, there might be a dedicated cleaning area set-up anyway? (assuming you're at an official meet) The reaction of salt and water will basically give you sea water - which is slightly alkaline. The problem is that the salt increases the conductivity of the ...


2

Not necessarily an issue with the battery, but the corrosion does need to be cleaned off or the health of the battery will suffer. Use a baking soda and water mixture with a scrub brush, followed by a liberal water bath. Once cleaned up, then put some high pressure grease on both of the posts to keep it from returning any time soon. Something to consider in ...


2

Make sure that the connections at both ends of both battery cables are clean and tight. Corrosion at one end of a cable suggests there may be corrosion at the other end as well. If the car usually starts, and always starts when jumped, then the issue is unlikely to be an alternator or fuel flow problem.


2

I would remove that terminal and fit a new one - new terminals are available at most auto spares shops. Do make sure that you get the correct one (positive terminals are larger than negative ones) - the symbol just to the bottom left of the battery post does seem to show negative but as you say it is positive - just make sure...


2

I used to own a car that ran on LPG (Honda Accord). This meant my LPG tank was my main fuel source, and the full-size petrol tank was used only when starting the engine, and as a backup. I tended to put about 20 litres of petrol in every 3 months, so the tank was never more than 2/5 full. When I sold the car it was 12 years old and ran without issue, ...


2

It's hard to tell from the pictures, but it could be Vaseline. A coating of petroleum jelly helps reduce corrosion and prevent dirt from getting into the contacts. I'd suggest leaving the Vaseline on while it's stored, then clean it off before reinstalling the battery.


1

Auto batteries do best at 80 degrees Fahrenheit. That being said, the warmer the weather, the more corrosion occurs, so if you're experiencing corrosion problems, consider the following: Are you in a warm climate? How often has the vehicle been in use lately? We're the last batteries installed with using a single/no metal dielectric compound? Is it a 12V ...


1

Aspects Which Affect Corrosion Moisture In a hot and dry climate, metal is much less prone to rusting than in a humid or wet climate. Rust is the byproduct of a process called "corrosion." Metal corrodes when it goes through a chemical reaction involving the oxygen in water. If the metal is kept dry at all times, it is much less likely to start rusting ...


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