35

Can't believe no one has posted this yet, but: Source: https://geekologie.com/2019/07/meanwhile-in-florida-a-car-with-a-window.php


29

Practically no. An air conditioner is a heat pump: it takes heat from one location and pumps it to another location where it can be radiated. This takes a fair amount of power: a 12 volt auxiliary source isn't going to be enough to make a real difference. Also, the heat has to be pumped somewhere; you'd need a radiator somewhere outside of the cabin, or a ...


23

Back in the 1940's and 1950's there used to be a product called a "Swamp Cooler". This was effectively an evaporative cooler that you sandwiched into your partially open car window. As you drove, air flowed through the device, was cooled by evaporation and ducted into the cabin (across the top of the drivers head). I have no idea how well these work but ...


15

The air conditioner in a car draws several kW of power. A cigarette lighter socket is limited to ~150 W, which is far too little to noticeably reduce the temperature in the car. Things you can do to reduce the temperature in the car: paint the roof white And things you can do while the car is parked to reduce the temperature when you get in: park the ...


11

I have used home made ac units that consists of a cooler, fan & ice (see video). It works GREAT for a hour or so depending on how hot the day is. You could get a 12V DC fan that plugs into your cig lighter and set cooler in passenger floor or seat. I used to freeze a few 1.5 gallon (5.7 litre) square jugs to rotate in and out so I always had ice ...


9

From your description it doesn't seem like oil. As for why it continues to look brown, you probably haven't flushed it enough times. When I had an oil-in-coolant condition on one of my vehicles, it took the mechanics at the dealership 12 flushes for the coolant to come out clear. And this was after having replaced most of the cooling system's hardware (...


7

This sounds like a problem with the radiator fan control system to me, the radiator fan should turn on automatically when the temperature reaches a certain temperature, and switch off when below. We know it works because it comes on when you turn on the AC, so that means the control module is probably okay, the issue is most likely the temperature switch has ...


6

Coolant coming out clean is a good sign. How to spot a bad radiator A radiator is a device consisting of tubes through which coolant flows and fins connecting the tubes. The fins increase the surface area of the radiator (dramatically), increasing cooling efficiency. The surface of the radiator should look uniform. If there is an area where the fins are ...


6

It is certainly possible to retrofit air conditioning to cars, as long as they have the electrical capability to support it (or you upgrade the alternator too). Lots of classic cars are now using this method. You can buy kits or see an example for instance of all the individual components: from various suppliers


6

If you didn't overheat the car, then you've done no damage. The radiator cap seals the system and allows pressure to build (to a point), which raises the boiling point of the coolant. This allows it to take more heat. If you didn't overheat your vehicle, there's nothing to worry about. The only thing you'd need to do is ensure you haven't lost any coolant in ...


5

For a ratty old pickup truck that lost all of its R-12 from a leaky condenser, the cheapest fix was a supermarket-grade window air conditioner, an inverter that I already owned and some welding cable for the battery hookup. The factory original 140 amp alternator provided plenty of power. The 4000 BTU/hour (4.2 MJ/hour) A/C provided plenty of cold air.


4

If the hoses are shedding rubber then they are nearing their end of life. To avoid problems, like having one burst open on the road, you should replace any of them which are showing signs of age. Being pliable is NOT a reliable test, in fact when they get old and start to deteriorate they usually get more pliable. Replacing the hoses is not that expensive ...


4

Your car's coolant is cooled via a radiator mounted at the front of the engine bay. Typically, this radiator has one or more fans on it, which the car turns on and off as appropriate to control the amount of air moving through the radiator. This lets the car's control systems manage the temperature of the coolant even when in different operating conditions (...


4

Radiator flush isn't anything magic. It is just a corrosive liquid that attacks everything in contact with it, to greater or lesser extent. You hope it dissolves the blockage before it makes a mess of anything critical like the cooling passages in the cylinder block or the inside of your water pump, or it dissolves a hole in the radiator itself. (Old ...


3

The long term effect is that the leak will etch a groove in both your engine block and heads. There may be a groove already there, but it could still be within "surface flatness" standards. Causing structural damage to your block and heads is a costly mistake. The "flatness" standards for each gasket mounting surface should be outlined in the shop manual ...


3

Air is getting into the cooling system to cause rust. The most likely place is the radiator cap ( not the reservoir cap ). The radiator should be "sealed" , the only exchange should be into and out of the reservoir which acts as an air lock to keep air out.


3

If you mean will it keep the pressure in the system, I'd think not, though that'd be an educated guess. There's two things which are working against you here. First, you cannot get the cable tie tight enough. They just won't allow you to. Secondly, as everything heats up, the cable tie will get soft and expand. In both cases, the coolant when it gets up to ...


3

Basically, leaving your cooling system dry and letting it sit will cause you no issues. Don't run the vehicle (obviously) without coolant. If you run it too long, this can cause issues. If you have an aluminum block, there's no chance for corrosion. The aluminum will have already formed a protective barrier, which inhibits corrosion. If an iron block, you'...


3

If your cooling fan is running the water pump might be failing,it is often the impellar coming loose from the axle in the waterpump so you will need a new waterpump. If your cooling fan does not start the car will overheat while standing still idling,but when you are driving the airflow thru the radiator will keep the engine cooled but if you drive uphill ...


3

Yes, foward motion forces air through the condensor improving cooling, but when the vehicle is stationary this forced air does not happen and you have to rely on the cooling fan or fans. If those fans are not working well that can have an effect as well. The forced air cooling is also or sometimes called ram air cooling.


2

Could be a number of problems but from simplest to most complicated: 1) Bad radiator cap: The cap is supposed to onto vent coolant when the pressure exceeds the system limit. If it's bad it may allow coolant to leak out at a lower pressure. Try a new cap. 2) Bad thermostat: Can be stuck closed or nearly closed and this overheats the coolant in the engine ...


2

The oddity is there to lessen fan noise. The uneven spaces creates air pulses that cancels out some of the noise, without lessening the ability of the fan to move air.


2

What @blacksmith37 says is true, kinda. You could stick the hose into a catch bottle, and that would tell you that coolant is coming out during high load, high temp conditions. That's it. The coolant in that bottle WILL not go back into the radiator during cool down, like in a more modern cooling system. What makes that work in a modern flow back overflow ...


2

Your car has a cast iron engine block (now aluminium blocks on recent cars). So with time, no movement and a little bit of oxygen in the coolant, your engine block will rust from the inside. There is nothing to worry. It's just a pain to remove. Keep flushing and it should be fine.


2

RUST. A lot of it. In the form of micrometer-sized particles. It behaves like a clay or mud. You cannot simply flush it away. You need a flow, vibrations and temperature to get all of it dissolved, i.e. you have to run the car for a while. And you need to drain the cooling system right after stopping the engine, or else the rust will settle back. Rinse, ...


2

Just to illustrate how subjective this question is - about 10 years ago, I bought a 1939 Farmall tractor from the son of the original purchaser. The family had actively used the tractor on a small farm from new until a few years before I bought it, it had unknown thousands of hours on it. It clearly had a (minor) headgasket leak. The son (who was in his ...


2

It's impossible to say how long a relatively minor head gasket failure will stay that way, it depends on the placement and nature of the failure, as well as other factors. It will certainly get worse, either all at once or gradually. Being gentle on the power will certainly help. If it's gradual you can live with it, but all the while you're getting oil in ...


2

No, CLR is NOT suitable for this use. From the CLR web site under the FAQs: Can I use CLR to clean out my radiator? CLR should not be used in or on a car radiator. CLR may not be compatible with the materials associated with a radiator and it could have adverse effects if the CLR is not rinsed out completely. See: CLR Web Site


2

Some of these might work: (Essentially google rv or truck dc air conditioning) https://www.google.com/search?q=rv+dc+air+conditioner&ie=&oe=&safe=active but anything that runs out of a cigarette lighter and/or doesn't vent to the outside is almost certainly a rip-off--It's either evaporative (if it doesn't vent) or won't do much cooling (if it'...


2

The long road: A factory retrofit First you skill up some electronics chops. This will be Very, very heavily electronics oriented. Then, you get the schematics for your car, and you evaluate how the A/C normally wires into this car, particularly into the Powertrain Control Module and Body Control Module. Your objective is to determine whether your PCM ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible