Hot answers tagged

87

Uh ... absolutely not. Salt water will cause corrosion with in the engine block. Salt water is an electrolyte, so will pass electricity which will cause electrolysis. Also, it might be able to handle a bit lower/higher temps than straight water, it doesn't work as well as antifreeze. Antifreeze is usually good to -40°F/-40°C, plus it protects your engine ...


29

Terrible idea. The salt will precipitate and block the radiator fins Of course you know you can dissolve things like salt into water. You probably also know there's a limit to how much it can hold - called saturation. Saturation is dependent on temperature. If you saturate warm water and then let it get cold, the material will precipitate - in salt's case, ...


7

"Green" coolant is usually considered a typical coolant. It should get changed out about every two years. "Orange" coolant implies Dexcool, which is the stuff used in GM vehicles and is a long life coolant. It should be replaced about every five years or 150k miles. If you mix the two together, there's no real issue, but you shorten the life of the coolant ...


4

Salt-water (sodium chloride) solution was, and often still is, used for weight/ballast inside tractor and equipment tires, as that cheap alternative to antifreeze in winter. Very nasty stuff and highly corrosive to metals not prepared for it. No way would I want that inside an engine block! Interestingly current trends are towards using antifreeze and other ...


3

Early on when coolants changed to different types you could not mix types, they would gel. These days all coolants can intermix without issue as coolant manufacturers made coolants compatible with any other type of coolant, so you are safe with mixing these days. But as Paul stated doing a cooling system flush is part of regular maintenance as coolant ...


2

So if I understand correctly, one of your radiator hoses (I'm assuming the UPPER one here since if it was the lower one, they never would have been able to fill it with coolant to begin with) was disconnected or (more likely) became disconnected at some point while you were driving. If that's the case and your engine overheated to the point of stopping, as ...


2

As another answer states, it's due to pressure, but here's some more information so maybe you understand better. Below is a chart which shows how the relationship to pressure affects the boiling point of water (from this website): In the chart, it is using 14.7psi as air pressure at sea level. As the pressure rises, so does the boiling point. A typical ...


2

Because the system is kept under pressure and that raises the boiling point of the fluid. This also explains why it is dangerous to open hot systems - the rapid expansion as the fluid reaches equilibrium can cause burns...


2

If you are going to drain and flush the radiator, then the color doesn't matter. Just stay within the specs for what the manufacturer says. As a side note, I prefer to use the premix, personally (50% antifreeze/50% water). It seems like it might be a bit more expensive than buying the straight antifreeze and mixing it yourself (which it is). The big bonus ...


2

Most modern engines have aluminium heads (or other components) for reduced weight, and absolutely require antifreeze in the coolant for it's anti-corrosion properties. Aluminium heads at temperature are prone to corrosion and using tapwater, other than quite temporarily, will allow corrosion to start. Use antifreeze if you don't want to pay for a new engine (...


2

Usually that indicates there is an issue with either a head gasket problem or a cracked block. In either case, it's not good and is going to be major surgery or engine replacement. From your description, there's no way of knowing how this might have come about. Whatever did cause it or how ever it occured, doesn't really matter at this point. You're going to ...


1

Some marine engines are cooled directly by the overboard water and some of them tolerate salt water as well. Other than that, @Harper answer sums it best. Edit: If I was in a dire need to travel in a sub-freezing conditions (or any other conditions where only e.g. sea water is available, I would pretty much try. Few hours of salty water can't be as bad as 10 ...


1

In addition to the corrosive nature of salt water antifreeze does another duty--it has a higher boiling point than water.


1

The problem is, you have the D17A2 engine with a bad head gasket. These are notorious for this problem. It usually happens when there is the "green" coolant used instead of the Honda "blue". Whatever Honda did with these engines, it doesn't play well with anything other than Honda coolant. As for the fix, you can have the head gasket changed, which normally ...


1

Engine coolant is cooled when air passes through the radiator. Air is passed when the car drives down the road, but when the car is stationary there is no air being passed through the radiator. This is when the radiator fans turn on and draw air through the radiator. The fans are probably not turning on. Some reasons they fail are broken fans, wiring, bad ...


1

They can do a cooling system flush and it'll be fine. It takes a while for mixed coolant to do damage. You should be fine with a monday flush. Flushes run less tha $200.


1

No. A P1281 code means the engine isn't reaching operating temp in the amount of time the ECM expects. Usually a bad thermostat.


1

You'll want to drain the coolant out, of course. Then fill the cooling system with straight water and add dish soap, or better, an industrial degreaser like Purple Power. Run it for about 30 minutes, drain it out, and do another identical flush (water and whatever chemical you used the first time around). After that you'll want to do a third flush, but with ...


1

The answer to your question is, no the water has no effect on the starting. My first step would be to check all connector under the hood. You may have bumped one or forgot to hook one back up after your repairs. Then if that's good check for trouble codes. Then check fuel supply. You may have a bad fuel pump and\or filter.


1

It has 5 US quarts coolant. You can check HERE as a reference


1

No, you really shouldn't do that. You aren't really protecting anything by doing it. You're just putting a weak form of antifreeze into your cooling system, which will drop the freeze point a few degrees, but won't stop it from freezing. 50/50 coolant is ready to use. Don't add water to it. If it does have only water in the system, there should be no problem ...


1

While not a totally reliable indicator, there are common colors that are used by many antifreeze manufacturers: Green: Usually Ethylene-Glycol-based and is the most common type in non-GM vehicles. Red or Orange: Dex-Cool used primarily in GM vehicles. Blue: Propylene-glycol-based. These types should NOT be mixed since that can caused problems with engine ...


1

Maybe. For a while. Perhaps. If the plug loosens or falls out, the engine may be damaged, you won't have a drain plug or coolant, and the car will be immobile. Solution: get a big plastic tub. Drain coolant into the tub. Remove drain plug, add washer, reinstall plug. Refill cooling system using the coolant you just drained. Bleed the cooling system.


1

Regular ethylene glycol was the antifreeze used then as now. The corrosion inhibitors , and other additives have changed and vary from brand to brand , but basically the same stuff. In '53 there were a few still using methanol/alcohol , but it was a high risk of fire. Modern corrosion inhibitors focus on aluminum but should work on your copper and brass ...


1

Ethylene Glycol ... you know ... the green stuff? Prestone. Peak. Walmart brand. Generic from Princess Auto. It will all work just fine.


1

Ethylene glycol is your typical antifreeze. I see on the Halford site you can pull up the data sheet. It tells you in there if it has ethylene glycol. This tells me the "silicate" type is what you need.


1

You could or you could backfeed the hot out of the block after removing the thermostat then reverse the flow after. Flushing tends to be needed if it is overheating, as you have not mentioned any issue like that then if it is running fine then just change the coolant and put in fresh antifreeze or anticorrosion as specified.


1

I'll first say that it is not a question of your engine not overheating at all, but rather your engine not overheating yet. Empty coolant will absolutely cause your engine to overheat given the opportunity. You should not drive this vehicle more than is absolutely necessary because running an engine dry can cause a whole host of very expensive issues. Also, ...


1

Several possibilities but the one that comes to mind first, due to your spraying issue, is a coolant hose burst or a connection loose. Either way you want to deal with this promptly as you may cause severe damage to your expensive engine very quickly should the cooling flow to the vital parts get interrupted. Next up would be a problem with the water pump or ...


1

In my opinion, they seemed to be concerned about the antifreeze and replaced it. That was a good call. They were probably trying to clear the system. Many times on vehicles this age, multiple flushes are required to completely clear the system. They probably wanted to do more but didn't want you to go through the extra expense on a vehicle that age. If they ...


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