11

I believe (and this is a gut check) you can chalk this up to deteriorated hoses which all have gone bad in the same period of time (coincidence). Each has probably served a long fruitful life and now it's time for replacement. Especially considering where you live and overheating as well, this does not seem unreasonable to me. I'd suggest if you have any ...


10

Remember that the reliability of any system of components will only be as strong as the weakest link. Coolant lines are pressurized under regular operation and the walls of the hoses will weaken with many, many heat cycles. It is expected that a coolant leak will spring at the weakest point of the system. The moment you replace this hose, the weakest point ...


10

It seems that you are only worried if the car will leave you stranded, not if it is bad for the car to drive around with (possibly) a bad head gasket. Driving around with a shot head gasket is not optimal as some of the coolant may end up in the engine oil, but being a cheap car and driving short distances it probably is not that big of a problem. The car ...


7

tl;dr: it's really called a coolant flange. I had also never heard of a coolant flange but it turns out that it's a real part and, based on the video, it's a part that fails around 120K miles (which sounds reasonable for the age of your vehicle. An example of a coolant flange repair. Some examples of coolant flanges (which seem to be common for Audis and ...


5

I would not immediately assume the repair shop was out to get you. Its possible, but not likely. PepBoys is a national chain, and their best most profitable behavior is to quickly and efficiently repair customer's cars. Any national chain will also spot check the reliability of their individual repair centers. I'm not saying its impossible, it just doesn'...


5

I checked a known good waveform (cannot copy here, copyrighted). Yours is shifted just a bit to the right. Around your frame 95 that cam sensor vertical line should exactly bisect the horizontal line on the crank signal. Most common failure for a small shift is bending of the locator roll pin on the cam pulley.


4

Provided you regularly check the coolant levels (with the engine cold) and top up then you ought to be fine. Running an engine without coolant is not ideal but I suspect there was some residual left in the system because you saw the overheat light. This is because the way the gauge works is to take the temperature of the coolant. With a completely dry ...


4

Bubbles can usually be an indicator. Coupled with the oily coolant and coolant loss, it seems like a pretty cut and dry case. However the only way to know 100% is to get your exhaust tested or system pressure tested at a shop. My money is on a blown head gasket though. Keep an eye on your oil and engine temp and get it checked soon.


4

What you're describing is usually where the drain is for the A/C core. Humidity collects on the evaporator core, then gets collected, then drains out through this tube. If the radiator is a bit low, then refill it with 50/50 premix and call it a day. Leaving it sit will not cause any issues.


3

The rubber seal around the outer edge of the thermostat should provide the seal without the use of RTV. 3+mm would be enough to cause a leaking issue, no doubt. As for the RTV which you now have on there, you'll need to clean it up because I believe you'll run into sealing issues with it there. Since the piece is plastic, you'll have to take extra care not ...


3

There could be a number of things going on. Without external evidence, high oil usage can be from worn piston rings allowing oil to be sucked into the cylinders and burned. This is called "blow-by". In your case, with excessive oil and coolant use, there is a good chance you have a bad head gasket, or gaskets. This can allow coolant and/or oil to pass ...


3

Many times in older cars when a leak develops it's because of a pinhole sized rupture in one of the coolant hoses. When the car is cold you won't be able to see the leek because it will only show up once the system is hot and the coolant is under pressure. So what you should do is refill the coolant then let the car idle with hood open it until it is hot and ...


3

If the leak is only inside the vehicle: There are 2 tubes that allow the coolant to flow in and out through the firewall. These tubes send heated coolant to the heater core inside your dash to provide the inside of your car with heat. If it is leaking inside the car, then either one of these tubes has a hole in it, or your heater core is has a leak. (its ...


3

Small leaks can be difficult to pinpoint. There are dyes that can be added to the coolant that will glow when seen with a black light. You can try installing a pressure tester. It is a small hand pump that pressurizes a cold cooling system to simulate a hot pressurized system. I would remove the torque converter inspection cover and pressurize the system. My ...


3

Cooling systems build pressure as they get hot. You will need to isolate where the leak is coming from. Here are a few scenarios that could be in play. Radiator cap is not holding pressure and allowing overflow/discharge Radiator hose has a leak Radiator hose clamps may be corroded and unable to hold properly Water pump is leaking If the hoses are very ...


3

Firstly, if your coolant is draining every week, then you have a major leak somewhere, and I'd recommend you get that fixed first - otherwise you may find that you run out during a journey and overheat your engine, which could result in total engine failure. Secondly, I would not recommend putting ordinary water directly in the coolant system for any length ...


3

In addition to what SteveRacer noted about the coolant analysis, you have all the symptoms of interrupted coolant flow. Usually its a broken water pump but in your case it could also be a clogged cooling system from driving with a leaky head gasket for a prolonged period of time.


2

A leaking head gasket can lead to exhaust pressurizing the cooling system. This will generally fail the current weakest link in your cooling system. As you replace one component, the next weakest component will fail.


2

As a first step to helping you answer your question it will be helpful to familiarize yourself with the cooling system. I would recommend this video as a short introduction. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J48JLu_L5cY There are several components that may fail in the cooling system. Here is a list of places where leaks can typically occur. A cracked ...


2

It could be a stuck or blocked radiator cap. Did you change the cap at any stage? If the level in the coolant reservoir fails to rise and fall with engine temperature that could be a clue.


2

There are a couple of things here. First, the small puddle under your car is more than likely just water coming off of the A/C condenser. I speculate this is what it is due to there not being any smell to the liquid puddle. This is completely normal. On the flip side though, when the mechanic said you "need a new thermostat" because the housing was leaking, ...


2

I agree with dlu. I would check the radiator cap next if the thermostat is known to be good and the car doesn't show that it's overheating on the gauge. Here's a picture of the functionality associated with the radiator cap. The cooling system builds up a lot of pressure as it reaches operating temperature, so the radiator cap is designed to relieve this ...


2

It is probably "normal spill" while driving because the cap on this model seems rather crappy. Because if it overflowed due to overheating etc. the liquid would have come out from the pressure vent, not from the cap. (well perhaps from the cap also in this model because caps do not seem to tighten well). See this thread for nice photos and a good ...


2

What you are seeing is the residue from coolant. If you look inside the overflow reservoir, you can see the standard "red" Toyota coolant, thus the reason for the red-ish looking residue. Why the residue is there is another story. It could be from someone missing the overflow while trying to pour more coolant into the jug. It looks more like there was a ...


2

If it's not near a hose and it seems to be coming from the engine it could be a corroded core (sometime called freeze plugs) plug, The round thing pressed into the engine block in your pic is a core plug, There is coolant behind that so if it's corroded it could leak. There will be several of them around the engine and in the cylinder heads They are easy ...


2

Aight, disassembly is complete. The coolant o-rings inside the timing cover are cracked and rotten, as is the timing cover gasket. So, to answer the original question:Am I looking at replacing a gasket? Well, the answer is yes and no. Yes, I need to replace a (few) gaskets. No, what you really need to do is disassemble about half the front of the car just ...


2

That buildup is definitely the sign of a leak, probably from the seal at that joint. It could have simply worked loose, or the seal could have degraded. If it was me I would drain the system, clean up that joint and replace the seal. There seems to be some buildup on the corner of the box as well, it's hard to say whether that's from the same problem. If it'...


2

Assuming that you are correct and their are indeed no coolant lines around there, I can only think of 3 things, but the second 2 are certainly grasping at straws Freeze plug. Nick C called it a core plug. If one of those is no longer sealing or is gone completely, you would be pouring coolant and it might be very hard to see. Feel around for a hole, ...


2

Yours is not the only mark \ model that has this type of issue : jag x type are known for leaking coolant tanks, again made of plastic. The plastic tank is a "cheap" solution but has a limited life. A copper or brass metal tank will have a longer life, but weight and cost come into play. As long as your pressure cap is working correctly then excess ...


2

There is a distinction between fluorescent coolant dye and UV (Ultra Violet light) flourescent coolant dye. Years ago you could just buy a coloured dye and add this to the coolant. It was usually green stuff, sometimes yellow, and could easily be seen, even in difficult places with an ordinary, yes ordinary, torch, if necessary. The UV dyes are not really ...


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