11

ABSOLUTELY Yes, when you do any major work to the front suspension, you need to have the alignment done. Even though the parts are "basically" the same, they are not exact. Newer parts will be tighter than old (less deflection and no wear), so will put the alignment into a different position. The only thing you are going to cause by not getting the ...


7

Replace bolt and nut Likely, there's no damage to the control arm. 70 to 40 is a big jump, but not likely extremely damaging, in my opinion. However, I would definitely replace the bolt: putting that much strain on it risks reducing the bolt strength such that it could break while you're driving. Replace the bolt, and while your at it, replace the nut as ...


6

Suspensions that use upper and lower control arms are plenty. They are found in much more than trucks. Sports cars often have these types of suspensions because they can have lower unsprung weight compared to say a McPherson suspension. The naming convention comes from the attachment to the knuckle. If the control arm attaches to the bottom on the knuckle, ...


4

I would recommend you a ball joint puller. Sooner or later you will need to remove a ball joint without replacing it, so a pickle fork is out of the question. Heating the control arm sounds a bit dangerous to me, so there is only the mechanical solution left. Edit: Alternative solution: Since your fork appears to be too thin for the spacing you could insert ...


3

If pictures can tell a story ... my answer is sure:


3

The easiest way to separate a ball joint is to hit the knuckle straight on. Hit it like you stole it. And I'm not talking about hitting the ball joint where the threads are at. Hit the metal part where the ball joint goes up through. Ensure you have something to pry it apart as you are doing it only so you can tell when it's actually separated. EDIT: Here'...


3

That is the way Honda does a lot of their suspension parts. Take for instance, the part below. It isn't sold with bushings, but rather as a complete unit. This is the complete A-Arm from the front end kit for your Jazz (called a "Fit" here in the US). With this in mind, I don't think they are telling you anything out of the ordinary, though it does sound ...


2

I ended up following the tip I found in a YouTube video - remove the bolts from the No.3 Engine Mount and raise the engine with a jack and piece of wood under the oil pan. Worked just fine and the mount fell right back into place when I brought the engine back down.


2

Are you sure you are using the right size pickle fork? If its inserted all the way and it is no longer pushing the two pieces apart, it sounds like its too small. Heat, hammers, and pry bars have their place but there's no substitute for the right tool.


2

If the boot has been compromised, the grease that protects the joint and lubricates it will leak out, and foreign matter (grit, brake dust, etc) will get in - this will cause significant extra wear on the joint, and cause it to require replacement much sooner. However, if you're going on a road trip tomorrow, there probably isn't time to replace it. I'd try ...


1

Sure, control arms and constant velocity (CV) shaft assemblies do wear out. Grab a flashlight, a pair of jack stands and a floor jack. Jack the car up safely onto the jack stands. Never, ever, never work under a car that is just propped up by a jack. grab a flashlight. carefully inspect the constant velocity shafts for wear at the CV joints. Grab the ...


1

Just to confirm, it was the shock absorbers replaced them with my brother and the jumping has stopped.


1

From looking at the pictures, the only ball joint which is present is on the lower control arm. This should be the one your mechanic is talking about. If you dissect what was given you, I think this bears out: offside link arm ball joint and nuts worn (Facing upward) offside - Away from the driver's side link arm ball joint - There is only one ball joint ...


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