54

If your engine even has a problem carboning up, you don't clear it at cold start. Nor do you clear it by spinning the engine to redline. "Revving" isn't meaningful to diesel engine performance the way it is to sport gas engines and it doesn't help remove carbon. It's just a rationalization. To remove carbon, you want the engine working hard for 10-20 ...


47

Yes, this may be bad. The oil is not yet at the operating temperature, and the same is true for engine parts as well. I wouldn't redline a cold engine with cold oil. Your intention to clear carbon deposits is justified. But why don't you do this during a drive? That way, the engine and oil have had a chance to heat up to operating temperature. By the way, ...


17

Yes this is bad for your engine for a multitude of reasons. In fact, it's not good to run your engine at full throttle for extended periods of time unless the engine is designed to take it, whether it's cold or warmed up. Believe me when I say your little 1.2l Agila engine is not designed to take that kind of stress. I'll start by suggesting that engines, ...


13

From advanced-auto-maintenance.com: It’s widely acknowledged by automotive engineers that most engine wear occurs within this first ten minutes of driving before the engine has reached its highest, normal operating temperature. From bloomberg.com: When you first start the vehicle, do not race the engine. Accelerate gradually until the engine (and the ...


11

Crank shaft has a pulley or a sprocket at the front end, which turns a cam shaft/shafts through a cam chain or cam belt (timing belt). 1 turn of a cam shaft = 2 turns of a crank shaft. At the other end of a crank shaft is a flywheel which being turned by a starter motor for a start. Crank shaft is the first shaft in the whole engine which turns everything ...


10

In very cold climates there are electric heaters that replace the dip stick. They are plugged into an AC outlet and because they reach the oil pan they can apply heat directly to the oil. That way the oil doesn't get cold to the point where it totally looses it's ability to keep your engine protected at start up. It's plugging in that electric heater that "...


10

When your engine is cold, the gasoline is less likely to evaporate and create the correct ratio of air and vaporized fuel for combustion. Engines with electronic fuel injection have sensors that compensate for the cold by pumping more gasoline into the mixture. The engine continues to run rich in this way until it heats up to about 40 degrees Fahrenheit. ...


7

Yes, cold starts are hard on engines, this is very common advice. Restarting the engine when you get home should be less of a concern though since the engine is already warmed up. If all you're doing is getting out of the car to close your garage, just leave the engine running, you're not saving yourself any gas by starting it twice. Not only will doing ...


7

Pretty Common Problem with the Duke 390 This is a very common issue with the KTM 390. There are dozens of posts regarding customers who are experiencing the same exact issue. Additionally, there are a few YouTube video's that show the problem happening pretty consistently. The various proposed issues related by customers seem to revolve around these ...


7

To supplement kyle's answer I'll include this excellent animation, since a picture's worth a thousand keystrokes. The section on Electrics and how the animation showing how the timing belt connects to the crankshaft to the cams is especially helpful.


6

The main problem would be the battery, as already pointed out. In low temperatures batteries tend to lose power, and for batteries near the end of their lifetime this means that you won't have enough current to turn the engine. Another problem would be the wrong oil chosen for the engine. Oils have grades based on their viscosity in certain temperatures - ...


6

It sounds like your clutch master cylinder is initially letting fluid past the piston seals. Pumping the clutch pedal sounds like it gets the piston sealing again so that the clutch starts to work. I am presuming that the clutch and brake both share the same reservoir and that you are not loosing fluid and not having to keep filling it up. Is that correct? ...


6

Not familiar with your vehicle/engine specifically, but familiar with carbed engines in general. I would think the #1 thing to look at would be the choke. Pumping before starting a carb vehicle is normal. It gives it a squirt of fuel and sets the choke. The low RPM indicates that the high idle is not set, which likely means the choke is not set also. ...


6

The way the VW (so assuming Audi is similar) glow plugs are controlled on the TDI Jettas of similar vintage, the plugs should come on (what VW calls "pre-glow") whenever the block is cold. You should see this in the instrument cluster as the glow plug light coming on briefly (only briefly, the plugs are very effective). The glow plugs then remain on (or come ...


5

There are two things I'd look at as the problem. First and most likely is the solenoid on the starter is almost shot. The solenoid has a large copper washer which is pressed into the two posts (one from the battery connection and the other going to the starter motor). When this wears out, you'll get a clicking sound (almost a dead thud) as the Bendix is ...


5

Warmer weather this weekend provided an opportunity to try to get the bike running again. I wanted to give myself the best shot possible, so I installed new spark plugs and picked up some starting fluid. I also found the source of the change in exhaust note that occurred after the backfires. In fact, the difference was on the intake side--the air box had ...


5

Ice Probably the most common problem that people have is when their car is parked in a moist environment below degrees, resulting in ice forming on some or all of the windows. To resolve this problem, see this answer. Battery Another problem that is quite common (this happened to me recently), is if you have a car with a car battery that is in poor ...


5

Take your car to a local parts store and have them check the battery. Old batteries lose cold cranking amps and it may just not be getting enough amperage to turn the engine and start the car. Often a battery on its last leg will work fine while its warm but not have what it takes in cold weather. In answer to the second part of your question, it sounds ...


4

There are 3 areas to focus on: Battery: Make sure your battery can still hold a charge well as cold is going to show problems first. Double check that your battery cables are tight and not overly corroded. Starter: As Bob asked, if the starter is the original it could be going bad and struggling under only tough conditions Electrical/Ignition Switch: If ...


4

I believe the key clue here is the fact the engine runs rough for a few minutes. This tells me that the cold-start enrichment, where the air-fuel mixture entering the cylinders is slightly rich, isn't taking place. You may be looking at partially clogged injectors causing this. The reason I think this is the cause is that you've ruled out fuel rail ...


4

I believe the key clue here is the fact the engine runs rough for a few minutes. This tells me that the cold-start enrichment, where the air-fuel mixture entering the cylinders is slightly rich, isn't taking place. There are a few possible reasons for this: insufficient fuel pressure To rule this out, have the fuel rail pressure tested to make sure that ...


4

A car battery's power will drop with temperature. It would be my first port of call. Since the car ran fine when you had it jumpstarted with the help of your friend, I would have the battery tested to make sure that it can deliver sufficient juice to the starter.


4

It may be the starter but you'd want to check for battery voltage at the B terminal on the starter and check that the circuit on the S terminal is OK first. When checking the S terminal have someone turn the key to the crank position. Also it would be a good idea to check that the starter is grounded properly. If you have power on both terminals and the ...


4

The only requirement for the engine after start before power is applied is that enough oil is flowing to the camshaft, bearings and cylinder walls and piston rings. The cam and bearings are fairly easy to get oil to quickly, depending on oil viscosity this usually happens in less than 20 seconds. The cylinder walls and piston rings are the last to get oil ...


4

-10°C should be no big deal for any car to start in, including diesels. Many diesel cars have glow plugs that are activated during cold weather before start (yellow spiral symbol light on dashboard). You have to allow sufficient time for them to preheat the engine: turn the ignition on and wait a few seconds for the yellow spiral symbol to disappear before ...


3

This may sound strange but try preforming an induction service. There is a condition that can sometimes occur where excessive carbon builds up on the intake valves. When carbon is cold it is porous and can absorb gasoline keeping it from getting into the cylinders. Eventually the carbon becomes saturated and fuel enters the cylinders. When the carbon gets ...


3

Your engine wears faster when you apply full/big throttle. It is not so bad if your engine is warmed up, and you are not driving like this all the time, this is why you have the rev range up to 6500. When your engine is fully warmed up you can use the high revs for overtaking and going uphill. When the extra power is not needed switch to higher gears. With ...


3

Firstly This is common on high capacity single cylinder engines where the compression ratios are very high compared to relatively sized multi cylinder engines. I have ridden a KTM 390 and I have faced this issue sometimes, getting it to restart is a pain, trust me its normal behaviour there is no fault or issue with the bike, its just the way the bike is ...


3

I would not worry too much about whether you are going to run out of battery power, especially if you keep the remote-start at a .8 second crank time. You will not burn up enough battery juice to cause yourself any issues. Your battery has several identifiers associated with it. A common one is CCA or Cold Cranking Amps. This shows you what the power output ...


3

As Hillsons said, cold starts are hard. So are warm starts, but to a lesser degree. The engine has no oil pressure when off, and starting it again causes very slight but very bad metal on metal contact. When warm this is much less contact than when cold, as the oil is usually primed and circulated. When cold the oil settles a bit and moves away from bearings....


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