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Coil on plug has several advantages over conventional distributor type systems: 1) Less voltage loss from the coil to the plug. With fewer connections and the elimination of the distributor rotor to cap air gap. 2) Can be used in conjunction with injector control to have the ECM perform misfire diagnosis. 3) The ability to control spark timing to ...


5

You CAN. The question is how much time and effort you want to invest. In your mustang, you have either points, or an electronic pickup (Hall Effect Ignition or HEI) that utilizes a single coil powering a distributor which distributes power to each of the spark plugs. For Coil on Plug, you would: a coil for each cylinder Something to drive the coils (an ...


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Check out the General Technologies TA500. This tool is quite inexpensive (for its incredible capabilities) and very flexible. Perhaps not for the DIY set, but there's no probing involved and it allows you to do coil-to-coil comparisons in seconds. TA500


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It would be lots and lots and lots of work. Did I mention lots. The car has nothing electronic at all. It has a carburetor and points and breaker distributor. There is effectively no starting point and everything would need done from scratch. Currently everything in your car is run mechanically. Points and breaker are mechanically opened and closed by a ...


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The biggest conceptual difference between a conventional coil-distributor-spark-plug ignition system and a system like coil-on-plug is the management of the spark and spark timing. A coil-on-plug system allows an Engine Control Unit (ECU) to manage the spark with low-voltage signals controlling the individual coils. In your hypothetical '68 Mustang there is ...


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The only real way to get the debris out without it causing any damage at all would be to remove the cyl head. Its the extreme way but the only definite way to know that the bore, rings & valves etc won't be subject to it. Second best would be to leave the spark plug out, rotate that cylinder so its approaching top dead centre if required and see if ...


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Waste Spark systems would have 2 cylinders giving trouble if it's anything upstream of the coil, as the one coil does both cylinders. Did you swap the dropper tubes and lead over too? Sounds like a dead dropper tube to me. Some coils, normally 3-wire ones, have drivers in them as opposed to in the ECU. It may be as simple as swaping coils around and seeing ...


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Every petrol/gasoline engine have a coil. It only might be located in different places and working on different voltages. Some have 1 single coil for all cylinders, some have individual coils - 1 for each plug, all in one case; some have individual, fitted straight on a spark plug, no leads.. So yes, you can fit. But why? What's on your mind..?


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