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7

When you get a bunch of codes on a car, the best way to work through is to fix only the first code - in this case the P2195. The easiest check is to look for a disconnected cable - Rear A/F Sensor Sensor 1 Bank 1 (which is also a cause of P1172). If everything checks out good, the other cause of a P2195 points towards the MAF having some debris in it. From ...


4

Technically no. "Codes" are errors that are set when a problem is detected, typically affecting emissions. "incomplete monitors" are tests that have not fully run to verify the validity of certain systems - perhaps HO2S, EVAP, catalyst, etc. An incomplete monitor is not saying there's a problem; it's just indicating that the ECU has not been driven ...


4

To be honest you need to be able to view live data using a scan tool. If you don't have access to these it may be cheaper to take it to a shop that specializes in Hondas. It's not inconceivable that both AFR sensors failed at the same time, but unlikely. Don't replace potentially expensive AFR sensors without doing basic checks first. Check for vacuum ...


4

That code is for "Intake Manifold Runner Performance Bank 1". That does not automatically mean the manifold needs to be replaced. These are the common reasons for the code; Intake manifold runner control actuator failure Powertrain Control Module (PCM) failure Restricted vacuum lines I'd start with #3 to see if it is as simple as a vacuum line. The other ...


4

There are two basic approaches, you can tap a speed sensor directly before it reaches the computer, or use OBD II signals (generated by the computer). Sensors usually generate a voltage, so you have to find the wire you are interested in and then install an analog-to-digital converter. This then has to either go directly to a COM port (if your computer has ...


3

Typically, Kawasaki's have their key code stamped into the ignition switch. Removal of the ignition switch is required in order to view the key code. I believe with Kawasaki's you be required to have a pin in torx (also referred to as tamperless torx) driver in order to remove the ignition switch. EDIT: Where to look: *On original key--if any. *On ...


3

I found a Toyota Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) #EG009-03 which talks about this very problem with the VVTi engines. The bulletin gives the following steps to diagnosing/fixing the issue: Inspect the condition of the valve cover oil baffle as per TSB EG007–02. If camshaft or camshaft position sensor damage resulting from a bent baffle is identified,...


3

The fault code is related to your TPS Your TPS is a throttle position sensor. The fault code is not necessarily indicative of a broken wire although it could be. It sounds as though you have validated some of the wiring to your ECU but there are some additional checks you can perform to ensure that the issue is indeed your TPS. Check your wiring FROM ...


3

Too lean = too little fuel. I would probably try the fuel injector cleaning (Techron or comparable product) first and see if that clears up the issue. Next try swapping the fuel filter since this is usually a pretty simple/inexpensive repair. (Sorry, can't comment with current reputation)


3

The way to read the codes on your Jeep when they are flashing is, consider them blocked into two digit numbers. You'll get the first digit flashed, short pause, then the second digit. If there is more than one code, there will be a longer break, followed by the next code. Your string of codes break down into: 12. 53, 31, 32, 42, & 55. This website ...


3

This good answer has a list of all Jeep OBDI codes, pulling out the relevant ones we have: 12 memory to controller has been cleared within 50-100 engine starts 27 injector control circuit does not respond to control signal 54 camshaft reference circuit not detected 55 end of message 12 and 55 are not errors, 27 and 54 are, so concentrate on them. This ...


2

The connectors you're looking for should be under the dash on the driver's side of the car. This is the area you've opened up already. I don't think the lone green connector you can see in the "B" picture is one you're looking for. I think you'll have to dig around a bit more to find what you're looking for. The connectors look like this in shape: Here is ...


2

P1061 is a "Cylinder 1 oil supply solenoid valve stuck shut" code. If you've recently had your oil changed check to see that the correct weight oil was used and check to see if a OEM oil filter was used (the oil filter may not be as big an issue as having the correct weight oil, certain Jeep engines, the 3.7? need a filter with some valve or something ...


2

So I'll start by answering your question listed at the end. First off, while there is a small level of standardization amongst OBD2 reported codes, there isn't standardization as to what sets these codes. This information, generally know as the code setting criteria, is written by the manufacturer of the unit - say the engine. This criteria will differ as ...


1

For example, I see "head cylinder temp" and it says 422 for one of 'em ... and 190 for the other one (I'm assuming there are two because there are two different readings... in farenheight I suppose)... and that gets me worried. That seems awful high. So, just taking this one example of yours, we will need to know exactly where the two sensors are ...


1

The next time it stalls and doesn't start, spray some starting fluid into the throttle body. If it fires up, you know you have a fuel delivery problem. If it doesn't fire, you probably have an ignition problem. This will help you determine which path to take to find the right repair.


1

Unfortunately I do not have any access in my [USA] databases for your particular vehicle. However, the symptoms you describe seem to point to an "immobilizer" type function. I tend to doubt the ECU is at fault. I more suspect your "mashed" key fob. Has the battery in the fob been replaced recently? I would start with a new (or refurb) key fob that has ...


1

It turns out the the stumbling issue was due to a vacuum leak in the intake that was past the maf sensor so engine was getting incorrect oxygen reading which is needed to gauge proper air fuel ratio. replaced intake boot problems disapeared. However not sure if that solved the code I think it might have come back


1

This site was useful - http://www.freefordradiocode.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1617&p=42282#p42282. To Rory Alsop that commented above, this was a maintenance question! I swapped the battery on my car yesterday and wished to get my radio working again. The whole point of this site is to empower people to repair and maintain their vehicles ...


1

You can do what the mechanic should have done and test the cylinder balance, ignition, injection and compression to fully diagnose the misfire. Use this guide as a reference, its fairly comprehensive and specific to your vehicle as far as I can tell. http://troubleshootmyvehicle.com/honda/1.7L/how-to-test-misfire-codes-2


1

There are some codes related to the coolant system for a Honda that could begin pending, such as P0116 through P0118, P0125, P0128, etc. There are also multiple codes that could begin pending from compromised engine and emissions due to a head gasket blow or other damage from overheating, or a defective cooling system component causing performance and ...


1

You can generate Ford radio code easily from the radio serial number. All you have to do is to remove your radio and find the serial number starting with Mxxxxxx In your case the serial number is : M021238 Your radio code is : 1471


1

This fault indicates a low-voltage on the fuel rail pressure sensor. Check your fuel hoses at the fuel rail for leaks and disconnects. If everything is on tight with no leaks, measure your fuel pressure with the engine on, make sure you actually have fuel pressure for the sensor to read. If you have fuel pressure, do an electrical test on the pressure ...


1

In picture A, the Yellow connector is the SubaruSelect Monitor 1 connector - unless you're at a dealership, you won't have that tool, so you can ignore this connector. In picture B, the green connector is the D-Check (Dealer check) connector. There should be a mating connector (also green) very close to it. If you connect them together, you'll get a lot of ...


1

According to installation instructions for a cd changer retrofit on an E90 linked here, yes you will need to code the car for it. Coding the car will require an INPA OBD2 cable (purchased on Amazon, eBay, etc.) and the appropriate BMW progman software. Some INPA cables will come with software, but it's usually best to get the latest versions. If you have a ...


1

The keycode on my Kawasaki Ninja is on the original keychain... its kindof like a mini-dogtag.


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