6

Your best (easiest/cleanest) bet is to replace the master/slave cylinder assembly. The main part of play here is lack of use. What happens is seals dry out and when you then subsequently use the clutch, extra wear is put on the seal, which allows it to wear much quicker. You can avoid this situation by driving the car at least once a month until the entire ...


5

There are a couple different techniques you can use. Similar to what you mentioned, connect a hose to the bleeder, submerge the end of the hose in brake fluid. Open the bleeder, push the pedal down, close the bleeder, release the pedal. The hose submerged in fluid acts as a 1 way check valve. Closing the bleeder before releasing the pedal ensures no air ...


5

"While some air almost certainly got in, I don't suspect it was enough to make the pedal fall straight to the floor" You should have no air at all in the system. This symptom is typical of air in the system. A lot of care needs to be taken when bleeding, "close enough" will not work. Pick up a hand-powered vacuum pump off amazon or a local auto store for ...


4

The Astra H has a concentric clutch slave cylinder which means the gearbox has to be removed to replace it, 5 to 6 hour job. Try holding the clutch pedal down on the floor, engine idling - car in first - handbrake firmly on. Just keep it held down for a while and wait. If the slave is faulty, after a little time the clutch will try to take up the drive and ...


4

Here is what I do when having a stubborn clutch slave bleeding problem. I attach some tubing to an Oil can full of brake fluid, pump the oil can to purge air, then attach the end of the hose to the bleeder valve on the slave cylinder, open the bleeder and pump the oil can to force any air trapped up and into the master reservoir. Be sure the oil can is ...


3

When you have that smell, it is the clutch friction disk which you're smelling, not the clutch slave/master cylinder, nor any of the other mechanicals at that. When you have "that smell", you have overheated your clutch components and they have burned somewhat, causing the smell. When this happens, there is damage to the clutch friction components, but how ...


3

IMHO it is not normal: The clutch is supposed to spring up directly when you release it. I can think about the following potential root causes: (Provided your car has an hydraulic clutch actuator) The brake fluid in the clutch actuator lines needs to be replaced (Often overlooked as it is a separate circuit). I would advise you to perform this as it is ...


3

EDIT EDIT of my not being able to read: From the 96 Civic owners manual: "use Genuine Honda Brake Fluid or an equivalent from a sealed container that is marked DOT3 or DOT4 only. Brake fluid marked DOT5 is not compatible with your car's braking system... Use the same DOT3 or DUT4 brake fluid specified for the brake system [for the clutch]." 96 ...


3

I think the problem is your original transmission was having a synchro issue at the 5th gear, which migrated to the 3rd gear synchro. When I say "migrated" I mean that it too is worn out, not that there is an "infection which is spreading". I would venture to assume your new-to-you transmission suffers from the same fate. If you bought the transmission new ...


3

The slave cylinder is mounted on the bell housing with the fluid valve outside, and the piston within the housing. If there is a catastrophic failure, it is likely to be from the piston gasket: then all the fluid goes straight into the bell housing, wetting the clutch. Some points to consider: They may be rather more fluid than the slave piston volume; the ...


3

Here is a standard procedure. You may need to use a vacuum hand pump to 'prime' the master cylinder. I have encountered the issue you are describing and the luxury of having a mighty vac to pull the brake fluid through the system. Once the master cylinder is primed, it becomes much easier and you begin to get traction on getting the air out and having the ...


2

First, see if you can get the process started by loosening the pressure line(s) and pumping the pedal a few times. Once some fluid makes it way out and starts leaking, tighten the line(s) and continue to bleed the air out as normal. If the process still wont start, remove the master cylinder, bench bleed it, then reinstall. If the master cylinder won't ...


2

The bleeding procedure is the same as it would be for a hydraulic brake system. There is a nipple on the master cylinder to bleed out fluid and air, same as a brake caliper. Pump the clutch to build up pressure (keep clutch depressed) Open the nipple/valve on the master cylinder Allow fluid/air to escape from the nipple/valve Close nipple/valve on master ...


2

You won't be able to rinse brake fluid off the friction material, if it has become contaminated it will remain so for ever. Whether it needs changing depends on whether it has been contaminated to such an extent as to have a detrimental effect on the clutch performance - which it may not have done - you'd only be able to tell by driving the car (n.b. on the ...


2

I have had the same problem once. You have to bleed your clutch as soon as possible, because you're putting a lot of wear on your gearbox' synchro rings when shifting while your clutch isn't fully disengaged. I guess you have felt that shifting may go a lot rougher than before. Also, for now, put the box asap in neutral instead of just pushing the clutch. ...


2

At that temperature I would be more concerned about the viscosity of the grease in the clutch disc splines, rather than the brake "hydraulic" fluid. Maintenance of this fluid is cheap and easy, however, and makes a great starting point to either confirm or eliminate that part of the clutch system as a culprit. Re-greasing input shaft splines is quite a bit ...


2

The honing of an engine cylinder is done to help the piston rings bed in - the 45 degree angle of the honing and the 90 degree angle of the ring edge wear against each other and create a much tigher tolerance. You don't need this effect in a clutch cylinder, in fact it would be detrimental as you have a rubber seal rather than a steel ring. I would have ...


2

By what you describe its highly unlikely that the clutch is at fault here.. To me too it sounds like either the clutch master cylinder is sticking or the clutch pedal mechanism is at fault.. Or perhaps the clutch hydraulic system just needs bleeding. A repair to anything mentioned shouldn't be too expensive. The component you linked to could possibly also ...


2

Sometimes there is confusion between pedal free play and free pedal travel. The pedal free play for your civic should be 1 to 3 mm. This is to assure that the pedal is not putting pressure on the master cylinder. The pedal free travel is the distance the pedal must go down before the throwout bearing touches the clutch release toungues. This is to allow the ...


1

Should the clutch pedal not return to normal (up) position from the spring resistance in the master? If it has been correctly bled, it should return on its own. If you didn't bench bleed, it may not be able to draw enough fluid to get started on its own. In that case, not returning is normal. Based on your "air mixed in," comment, it either hasn'...


1

Start with some basic tests/troubleshooting. Verify that your clutch master cylinder (located driver's side under the dash usually mounting against the clutch pedal) is not leaking. Verify that your clutch slave cylinder (it will be mounted on the transmission) is not leaking. Verify all lines between are not leaking. If there are no fluid leaks at the ...


1

While the friction disk does not look worn out, there's more to a clutch than just the friction disk. You are also showing the pressure plate, which you can see wear on. The part you haven't shown is the flywheel, which is the other part. We cannot see if there are heat cracks or other signs of wear. The part which you cannot show is whether the springs are ...


1

There are a few of ways to bleed a clutch. One is to "gravity" bleed it, another is to bleed it much as you would a brake system, having someone pump the pedal, then hold it to the floor and open the bleeder valve to let the air out, close and do it again until there is only fluid coming out. But it sounds like the fluid drained completely out of your master ...


1

Press the clutch all the way in when you shift, you're harming your transmission. Why have a clutch if you're not going to use it when shifting? Push it in all the way. Don't replace the clutch plate, you almost certainly just have air in your clutch line. Rebleed carefully. They do not share the same reservoir.


1

After replacing the hydraulic lines as well as the master and slave cylinders, everything is working great. I confirmed the master cylinder was at least one of the problems. Testing it outside of the vehicle, the entire stroke of the cylinder couldn't move fluid at all. So yes, a hydraulic cylinder can go bad without having any external leakage. The ...


1

These could be seperate issues all together perhaps, the clutch does sound interesting, you might have missed something in the process of changing you're clutch? Also don't forget (I think) about the clutch slave (Not sure if VW beetles have one.. but I'd assume most if not all manual cars do).. Just check it over, making sure that everything is in its ...


1

Obviously the answer was to bleed the master/slave hydraulics.


1

If your clutch is burning out so often, maybe it's slipping - check the adjustment of the clutch lever by loosening the locking nut and turning the adjustment (it should engage around halfway on the lever and by fully engaged before the lever is fully out). The kick start may require the clutch to operate.


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