8

The terms commonly used are arrival and departure angle - mostly with 4*4... But to deal with your situation then change the arrival angle by adding blocks to lift the car early. Of course, you could fit adjustable controllable suspension either electric with an air pump (had that on a Volvo) or even hydraulic...


7

As Solar Mike said, it's called the arrival angle. However, an alternate solution to your problem might be to approach the ramp at an angle instead of straight on. This lets one wheel start raising up before the lowest section of your bumper touches the ramp. See this video for a demonstration with a speed bump: https://youtu.be/EQFrKWJli_A?t=368


4

Not really a solution for a daily arrival at a steep driveway, but one that works for 'ugly' speedbumps - though it takes a few tries to get it right. It's worth the effort if you have a low-clearance vehicle. It also prevents 'headbutting the roof' syndrome. It does, however, work best on longer cars (& not at all on big (Sprinter, Transit) vans, as ...


3

This is essentially looking for binding. It has nothing to do with how long it will spin on its own inertia. As you progress thru the assembly, it should turn with little effort to ensure there is no binding. Some instructions will even give you torque specs for each piston added. For example; If it does not turn easily, then something may be installed ...


2

I gave this answer here : Oversize rod bearings question A decent machine shop should machine the crank pins and provide the correct bearings as part of the job.


2

After a full rebuild, with every part lubed as it should be I would not expect to be able to spin any 4+ cylinder engine over freely by hand. If say you we're turning it at the flywheel, or the engine only had the crank installed then yes you should be able to turn it over quite easily.. but with pistons installed and trying to spin it say via the crank ...


1

Do the calculations: you have bore & stroke and compression ration. You could work out the volume in the cylinder head. Then you will know if they match. The workshop manual should tell you what the compression test values should be.


1

Ultimately it may not matter how it's measured. If you have a certain application in mind you should probably just get a look under each type and see what kind of clearance it has. The low point may be on the suspension near the wheels, but it may also be closer to the center. Consider that many lifted 4x4s have the low point at the differential housing in ...


1

It is possible, you can get spacer kits to raise the ground clearance of the car. That said there will be affects on the handling - and possibly increased wear on some suspension components as it will effect the geometry significantly in ways that the original designers and engineers of the car will likely not have planned for so I can't say for sure how ...


1

Modern engine with steel head gasket would require a maximum of 0.003" or 0.075mm. You can have a more irregular surface if you have an older engine with thicker compressible head gasket. The surfaces should be flat so that they match accurately as the error will grow as the different materials expand at different rates during temperature changes. For your ...


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