8

Any damage done to the car (likely, none) will have already been done. What you will have, however, is a car that will smell like theres a cigarette in the vent when the AC or heating is on. You'll have to dismantle the dashboard to get to it, unless you can see it. The easiest solution is to take it to a garage, and send the bill to your 'friend' who ...


6

You need to get it out or your car will smell like a lucky strike forever! Fortunately, it's dead easy to remove the side air vents on a fiesta, they are easily popped out using a plastic body tool. There's a decent video of the process here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8NTu6YYQ2M If you don't have the right tools you can get sets pretty cheaply, or ...


2

Exterior, hydrophobic (Ceramic) coatings, similar to rain-x but lasts up to 7 or more years. Is applied during the manufacture of the glass. Interior is Metal Oxide, same as metallized tint but is a coating applied during manufacture of glass.


2

Artificial "leather" is a plastic-like material. I'd use a cleaner for plastic/rubber/vinyl and not an actual leather product. You might check the Owner's Manual and see if they recommend a specific type of product or an actual product recommendation.


1

You should absolutely not mix vinegar and bleach as the combination creates chlorine gas, which is hazardous. Chlorine gas is used as a chemical warfare agent, you don't want to be creating it. What cleaner to use depends on what you need to clean, you won't necessarily know until you open it up. You'll probably want something that can remove grease and oil, ...


1

I tried many normal household products to clean engines and parts... And for 1 off then petrol, thinners etc may work, but the best solution by far was to take my disassembled engine block, heads, crank etc to the local machine shop and then put it in their washing machine. The parts come out like new except now you can see the wear marks and scoring etc. ...


1

As others have said alloy wheel cleaner and some moderate elbow grease is the way to go - but you'll want to be careful with which cleaner, some cleaners are very harsh and looking at the pics there are places where the top lacquer of the alloy has been damaged and harsher cleaners risk further damage/corrosion. Avoid acid-based cleaners such as original ...


1

You need a dedicated alloy wheel cleaner. While almost any cleaner may remove some of the stain it may also damage the clear coat. Be sure to follow the instructions as most require the wheel to be cool and hosed off after application.


1

Please use silicone spray for rubbers. WD40 doesn't have the solve it all ability. Not really meant for sensors or rubber even if they state it causes no harm. On the long term it collects dust and its not a lubricant.


1

Used it a lot back in the early 70's, seemed to be common knowledge in all the Dealerships and was Very effective at removing carbon deposits on the pistons and cyl. Head areas.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible