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I have seen quite bit of traffic on the internet about the differences. As with what Steve said, there isn't much. A lot of the things which people are saying are things like: "Carb cleaner leaves a residue, while brake cleaner doesn't". I pulled the Data Safety Sheet for both of the CRC cleaners (trying to keep apples-to-apples here): Carb Cleaner: Brake ...


6

All of this comes from: http://auto.howstuffworks.com/catalytic-converter2.htm Ok, attacking each of these in order: What exactly is a catalytic converter? It is a device in the exhaust path of your car that scrubs unwanted gases from the exhaust stream. How does it work? In chemistry, a catalyst speeds up a chemical reaction without actually taking part ...


6

A catalytic converter incorporates a structure that is coated in precious metals. When catalytic converters first came out that structure was ceramic balls coated in the metals. This didn't work so well and the structure was changed to either a honey comb or a monolith, both ceramic. The tubes of the honey comb run the length of the converter. A monolith is ...


5

• Why does it need to operate within a certain chemical range? The gasoline engine catalyst feedgas (exhaust gasses) must remain in a very small window of fuel mixture because the chemical reactions the that reduce NOx and oxidize hydrocarbons are mixture dependent and mutually exclusive. NOx can only be reduced in a fuel rich environment and HC can only ...


4

As far as chemicals in that area you have coolant, which does not typically smell even when burnt, but check the level anyway, and your brake fluid which can smell quite strong when burnt. So check those two levels. Rain can wash oils and fluids off cooler parts of the engine compartment onto hotter ones causing them to burn. You can test the battery with ...


3

As @Zaid stated in his comment, brake cleaner is volatile and leaves little to no residue behind ... it's how it's designed to work. The only fear I'd have is if the brake cleaner might degrade the siphon tube over time, but then oil itself may have a caustic affect on the tube as well, depending on what it's made out of. In my approximation, if you have no ...


3

Although I can't imagine it would be needed for your application, there is a truly non-hardening thread locking compound available. Vibra-Tite VC-3 is an acrylic polymer that dries to a resilient plastic substance as the solvent evaporates. It will allow the fastener to be re-torqued or even be removed and reused while still remaining effective. It's ...


2

"Disodium fluorescein dyes are added to antifreeze to help trace the source of leaks, and as an identifier since some different colored formulations are incompatible" Source


1

This is usually because the ambient air pressure when the bottle was filled is less than the current ambient air pressure where you are. The other possibilty is that a temperature reduction will also have the same effect. Usually a combination of both together though. This was a classic experiment in physics at school by boiling water then sealing the ...


1

The Loctite brand fastening sealants are Anerobic sealants that cure in the absence of air. That is why they cure when your fastener is assembled and they ask that you wipe away any excess. Whether they are considered Hardening sealants or not I don't know. Any Loctite sealant, including the red, will come undone and yield to the application of heat. I am ...


1

Not that it helps you now, but... I'm assuming you did this because the oil was over-full. An easier way to fix this in the future is to remove the oil filler cap and place the hose of a running vacuum cleaner or shop vac over it. This creates lower pressure in the crankcase, allowing you to remove the drain plug and have little/no oil come out. Then remove ...


1

I am a former organic chemistry student. This is a thought to ponder upon. We used a three step process to clean glassware in the lab. First, use sulfuric acid (battery acid), rinse with acetone, next sodium hydroxide (pure red devil lye), rinse with acetone, let dry. Notice that pure acetone is used to finish the job. Ponder that thought.


1

I have used many CRC products: Brake & Carb cleaner; both chlorinated & non chlorinated and throttle body cleaner. The CRC "green can" brake cleaner works really well for all intents and purposes and can even be used (most) painted surfaces (IE: clean tree sap off of body paint). CRC Carb cleaner tends to remove paint. I have even used CRC brake ...


1

I personally use them both interchangeably, some products here in the UK are now labeled "Fuel System Cleaner" and are essentially the exact same thing.


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