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24

That is your actual bumper The bumper you have off is just a cover for your real bumper which is what you are describing. That bumper, the real one, is tied to your frame and is actually absorbing the energy from impact where the facade is just existing as a cover due to the ugliness of the actual bumper.


11

If so, how do you measure the effect? tl;dr: by measuring the tension between the unbraced mount points. Today, I installed a Whiteline rear strut bar on my 2004 WRX wagon. The car has 162K miles on the odometer and has always seemed in need of a little more stiffness in the area of the rear seats. There's a large volume back there without any sort of ...


9

This part is generally called the impact bar, or sometimes reinforcement bar or bumper reinforcer, and, along with the (often styrofoam, sometimes plastic, missing or hidden in your picture) absorber pad, serves the actual safety purpose of a modern bumper. The plastic piece is called the bumper cover. The absorber pad is crushed to absorb energy in a crash,...


6

I cannot speak to local New Zealand laws, but here in the USA a common vehicle for EV conversion is the Chevrolet S10/Colorado and other small pickups. The combination of light weight, plenty of space for batteries, and a relatively simple design make these cars ideal. Moreover, since they have been around forever they are easy to find and cheap. Plus ...


6

There are a few front suspension issues that would be suspect, but my best guess would be the control arm bushings. When they go bad and break, the entire control arm that holds the wheel in place can shift. This is often accompanied by a lot of clunking noises going over bumps etc. Of course if you ran into a curb or similar, something could be bent or ...


5

First of all check the body panels and items you can see under the bonnet, doing this before you go to the hassle of getting alignment checked can save you money as you might find something that makes the car beyond economical repair. Check the roof skin/panel, if its simply dented down due to the ground hitting it it can be replaced, but if it's warped due ...


4

If there is no structural damage, you should be able to take a wire brush or angle grinder with a wire brush attachment and clean the affected area, then using the Hammerite, paint the surface to prevent further damage. I'm assuming Hammerite is like our POR15 here in the States. (The Hammerite website really isn't clear on what it actually does, other than ...


4

So let's think through this really logically. We'll start by defining how much the back wheels can turn by comparing with the statistic on the Wikipedia article you referenced: they said that at low speeds, the turning radius can be reduced by as much as 25%. So let's start by defining how far the back wheels are turning at low speeds. If you view a ...


3

I know of at least 1 case where that was true. From Autoweek Honda’s first 4WS system, launched in April 1987 on the Prelude, was all mechanical, using a shaft to connect the front-steering rack to a slider operating the rear tie rods. A planetary gearbox determined rear-steering degree based on steering-wheel angle. At small angles, the rear ...


3

The correct answer will depend on the size of the truck. As long as you have not exceeded the load capacity of the chassis you should be fine. However the longer the springs are the compressed to their maximum deflection the less likely they are to return to their unloaded shape.


3

Will installing a pneumatic suspension damage my vehicle? Not necessary depending on the kit. Per your vehicle a company called Air Lift does make an air ride lowering kit for your vehicle that has air bags for the rear that would simply replace the spring: and air struts for the front that will replace the coilovers: The issue you would face is if you ...


2

You could consider a rear engined vehicle such as the MR2 or MG TF. You then wouldn't have to worry about steering or the wasted space of the drive shafts. You could even have direct drive which would be nice as you wouldn't need any shafts or cv joints etc. You could also do some pretty neat things such as brake steer. Having two separate direct drive ...


2

This definitely sounds like some brake pads are worn down to the indicator wear bar. It is supposed to make a screeching noise when this happens. Don't take the car back to the mechanic who said this was normal for an automatic! But do take it to a reputable shop for another opinion. And yes, both points of your question are probably due to the same ...


2

An autobody shop can make the critical measurements to specific suspension alignment points on the unibody, according to the OEM specification. The vehicle is "benched", usually on the pinch welds under the rockers, and then a pantograph and pointer system with accurate scales is used to measure cross-corner suspension mounting points and other critical ...


1

I feel that being a Lancia enthusiast, I'm qualified more than most to speak on this. The condition of the chassis and by extension bodywork of a car is something that can be repaired, just bear in mind that the method of repair is significantly different to mechanical repair. Body work corrodes and rusts. Typically corrosion will start in box-sections ...


1

Numerous luxury brands currently employ this technology. Usually the "crab" function only turns on above a certain speed, because it is counterproductive at lower speeds. At lower speeds you want the back wheels to turn opposite the front, reducing your turning radius. However (and this is just my opinion from experience) in terms of "emergency" lane ...


1

Dependent on your country, I've heard this referred to as a chassis cross member (not so much anymore), bumper reinforcement bar and crash bar.


1

There are many different enthusiast groups that have done this stuff. Here are a couple that jump to the front of my mind: White Zombie (Oregon, USA) Green Monster (Croatia) Haven’t been able to find much data on the green monster, but the article does reference a company that makes conversions kits, and you may be able to get some good information there. ...


1

You did not specify the era of the car you wanted to convert, but newer models are more complicated, so the simplest conversion may be something classic. One very common platform for conversion is a VW Type I, the Bug/Beetle/Karmann Ghia cars. They're light and there's room to work. However, you'd have to want to have an old car, as well as an electric ...


1

Yeah dude put the Jack under the left front control arm. Jack car up see how far the left front tire gets before the right front tire comes off the ground. Then add a strut brace and repeat the process. If there is any difference in Heights subtract 1 from the other and you'll have your answer.


1

It made a noticeable difference on my old Legacy, but I was racing that car. You might not notice it with normal driving. If you are noticing frame flex in your car though, you have problems that a stabilizer bar won't help. If this is bothering you, have the frame checked.


1

Man, I have just the opposite experience as above.cThree cars of mine have strut tower braces. A 2002 Toyota Avalon, 2004 BMW 325ci and a 1995 M3. All 3 braces were "hingeless", and all 3 cars are unibody contstruction. All 3 braces made a difference but not all the same. The Toyota Avalon (Solara) brace made the biggest difference. The M3 brace made the ...


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