22

A rounded bolt is not a reason to junk a car. The numbers you're quoting sound fine for an alternator; if it was below 12V, I'd be worried. If you're still concerned, take the car to a spares store and ask them to check the battery and alternator. When it does come time to change the alternator, getting the bolt off would not take a lot of extra time; there ...


21

The battery is toast. Save yourself potential serious injury. Buy a new one. If the battery has been dead for eight months...it is pretty much a goner.


18

Cost is the main reason. An alternator that can provide full charging current would be far larger requiring bigger rotor and stator windings. This would make it more expensive and heavier. The manufacturers are using the fact that you only spend a small amount of time idling compared to driving to their advantage. Most cars are designed to cruise at ...


12

Given all the inefficiencies, is it "free" to plug in, say, a smartphone into a car to charge while I am driving? Short answer: no (but it's so hard to measure the impact that it be hard for you to tell). Remember, the alternator has to power everything connected to the electrical system. Charging the battery is a big load at first but drops off as the ...


12

No, you cannot. Well, you might be able to, but not in a feasible way in any likely manner. Electric Vehicles commonly have two separate electric circuits. One running at the normal 12V, which ties to all the common electronics that all other types of cars have. Light bulbs, radios, in many cases also a starter motor for the gasoline engine if it in fact ...


11

The starter circuit should only draw whatever current it needs so the excess shouldn't cause any problem.


10

Those numbers are the max that they can supply. Your starter will "automatically" use as much as it needs up to the max. If the starter needs more than those units can supply, the jumper will only provide its max. If your battery is only partly dead, i.e. it won't start, but the interior lights come on, you can use a smaller jumper than if your battery ...


9

Yes for the most part an AGM is a drop in replacement for your standard Lead Acid Battery. The charging voltages are almost identical. You are correct that they have a lower internal resistance and can be charged at a much faster rate. This shouldn't cause a problem on the majority of vehicles as the wiring in the car is designed to handle the maximum rated ...


9

The amp count tells you the maximum amount of current that the equipment can supply. Eg. Your car needs 600 amps to start: The 1000 amp jumper can handle it. Your car needs 1200 amps: The 1000 amp jumper can't do it. You'll have to find a bigger one. Be aware that this does not apply to voltage. If you have a 6V battery and you connect it to a 12V ...


9

The charging system of a car can deliver TONS of power, so small fluctuations in the alternator or battery are going to be meaningless to the comparatively small amount of power a phone charger needs, so I'm going to say "no effect at all" here. Different models of USB chargers will put out a different amount of power, normally labeled in Amps or Milliamps. ...


7

Yes, it is possible to charge the battery through a cigarette lighter socket, but there is a couple of caveats: The car's circuitry must have the lighter socket "live". It may require setting the ignition switch to "accessories." The charge rate must be kept low enough not to blow a fuse associated with the lighter socket (often 10 Amps). At 10 A it is ...


7

You should not incur any issues using a secondary battery with a battery isolator. It will not cause any damage to your alternator. For your edification, it won't be using wasted energy, but your engine will probably using a tad more gas to operate the alternator, which will have to do more work. On a side note, you might want to rethink exactly what you ...


7

The fastest, cheapest and easiest solution is to add a battery disconnect switch to the car. After placing the ignition switch into acc mode the open the hood and disconnect the switch. When you arrive at your destination, open the hood and reconnect the switch. This costs under $20. It also eliminates the need to run anything or calculate anything. Many ...


7

The voltage being a little low (13.75 is not low enough to be considered a problem in any case) is not going to affect their RPM reading - as it's the frequency of voltage variations that is measured to get your RPMs. I'd be tempted to say your tach is out slightly. You could ask them about that. There is a smartphone app that you can use to gauge RPMs - ...


7

The one tool you will need to purchase / borrow is a Volt Ohm Meter (sometimes called a Multimeter). Then you need to use it to read voltage AT THE BATTERY, before the car is started and after the car is started. My guess is you won't see any voltage difference. Before the car is started, I would guess you'd see voltages like 12.6v or so. After the car ...


7

No, it won't get damaged. But you also shouldn't let the battery totally empty for long periods. Li-ion batteries are best stored with some charge (normally about 40% is recommended charge level for long term storage per battery university :)) Volvo says that if you press the 'save' button your car will keep reserve charge or charge the batteries from ...


7

There are several possibilities: The bike's battery is bad. This is by far the least likely cause, as the previous battery behaved exactly the same way. The chances of having two batteries fail sequentially in the same manner is very low. The battery is not being charged when the motor's running. If there's something awry with the charging circuit or its ...


6

They are typically on the same fuse. Charging outlet should be listed as a cigarette lighter.


6

If an alternator could provide its full output capacity at idle, what would it output at red line? Output amperage is proportional to rotational speed of the alternator. Via gearing, an alternator could be made to spin faster at idle and produce its full amperage. However, at high RPM it would then be exceeding the speed at which it's designed to ...


6

Yes, a standard trickle charger will be fine. You need to make sure you give it plenty of time on charge, circa 16 hours; cranking a diesel engine takes around 700 Cold Cranking Amps. You may also find that, being diesel, it takes some time to prime the fuel system. I know it sounds obvious, but disconnect the charger before you attempt to start it. Don'...


6

A lead acid battery will self discharge about 5% every month. Assuming your battery was 100% charged, and there is no parasitic draw, that gives us a charge of ~55% after 9 months. Realistically, your battery is more likely at about 40-45% charge, so a very slow trickle charge of about 2A (as others have mentioned, 16 to 24 hours) should bring the battery ...


6

I have seen somebody spot-weld a short bolt to the rounded nut they are having trouble removing. It's cheap and quick if the equipment is on hand.


5

So I thought I'd come here to explain some physics. There are two important equations: p=iv - power (watts) = amps * volts v=ir - volts = amps * resistance Note - an amp is a measure of how many electrons are flowing through the wire per second. 1 amp is A LOT of them - I forget the exact number (I'm a mathematician, not a physicist) A volt is how ...


5

The PCM controls charge rate on this vehicle. It monitors battery voltage and amperage flows to decide when to charge and when to rest. This is done as a fuel saving strategy. Some systems use a three step strategy: No charge, 13.5 and 14.4v. Some use a two step strategy. The voltage at the power socket should be correct minus a tenth or two of drop due ...


5

You may have a bad stator As @paulster2 stated, you should have your battery tested. You could have a lead plate the broke free inside the batter and grounding out that cel to another cel. Your voltage test could be an indicator that it is not your battery though. Here is a method you can use to test your stator. Testing Your Stator There are three ...


5

2015 and newer Zero Motorcycles have a "Charge Tank" option that allows you to use standard chargers: Zero Motorcycles Charging Options. For fast charging on the go, Zero offers the Charge Tank accessory. It effectively triples on-board charging speed, typically allowing riders to recharge their power pack in as little as 2-3 hours. The Charge Tank works ...


5

Charging a dead battery using the alternator is hard on the alternator, it is best to use a Battery charger. Alternator manufacturers know the same things about alternators that we do- they are designed to maintain batteries that are near a full state of charge, not recharge deeply-discharged batteries. We post this on message boards all the time, but ...


5

The car will charge its battery while driving, e.g. when you brake. This allows the electric motor to augment the diesel engine, reducing overall fuel usage. The result is that the charge state of the battery constantly changes. In other hybrids (Toyota Prius) the control system keeps the battery charge in a range that optimizes battery lifetime (i.e. ...


5

You could have voltage at the socket with only one strand of copper connected so simply testing for voltage doesn't mean there isn't a fault. How to check for a bad Ground: Connect a load to the socket Set the multimeter to measure voltage Connect one lead to the Ground connection of the socket Connect the other lead to a known good ground If the meter ...


4

On older vehicles the alternator would give out a high rate until it became warm. This used to be known as its saturation point. The alternator output would then drop off to supply the demand put on it plus maybe a couple of amps. A later 'smart' alternator and its control system can carry out conductive tests while operating and will better re-charge the ...


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