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13

No, don't oil the chain with gear oil. Good motorcycle chain lubes are offered in a spray can and are thixotropic, i.e. have a time-dependent shear thinning property. When you agitate a thixotropic lubricant, it becomes thin and flows easily. This happens when spraying it from the can. It also happens when starting to ride the motorcycle. By being thin, it ...


12

My last chain lasted over 40k miles on a 955cc heavy sport-tourer. An O-Ring chain already has lubed pivots for life. All you need to lube is the rollers, the part that touches the sprocket. Spray into the pinch point between the chain and rear sprocket as you turn the wheel by hand. One time around, that's it. Biggest reason to not over lube is because it'...


6

If you put fresh oil on top of dirt then the fresh oil will carry dirt into the joints of the chain and that will accelerate wear. Clean it and lubricate it. Chain lube tends to be designed to "stick" more and get flung off less. But I have used gear oil on chains on lots of equipment and any lubrication is better than none. I have a chain cleaner which we ...


4

Chains, when fitted properly, should be uniformly tight and not have "knots" or "bulges" to catch on suspension or the inner wings. That said, I have heard many chains "clanking" on cars that have them fitted badly... Make sure the chain instructions are followed as well as those of the car manufacturer ... Two points: One, that looks to be a large chain ...


1

Cleaning a chain with diesel is acceptable for all chains that I am familiar with. We use kerosene, as it is a lighter oil. We have also used JET-A. All work OK, although the kerosene and JET-A will drain off more rapidly. Essentially you are using the oil for cleaning purposes, not lubrication purposes, and a lighter oil like kerosene or JET-A will ...


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