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1

The selection of choosing the best possible timing positions has nothing to do with keeping the camshaft(s) stationary. If the camshafts stay stationary, it's usually because there is a split between the intake and exhaust lobes opening times called the Lobe Separating Angle or LSA. Depending on how this is setup, the LSA is usually between about 110° of ...


2

Generally, your assertion that as one spring compresses another spring decompresses is correct. There are some caveats to this, though. This mainly has to do with the camshaft setup (ie: OHV v. SOHC v. DOHC) and the number of cylinders. Here is why each makes a difference ... In a four stroke engine, there are intake and exhaust lobes on the cam which ...


2

First of all you should NOT do this. Rotating the cams while the crank is stationary can damage the valves and/or the pistons. But assuming the head is removed from the engine and there is clearance below for the valves to move, you should be able to rotate the cams. That being said, the needed force is not constant but varies depending on what valves/...


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