Hot answers tagged

2

You assume that the piston fully retracts into the caliper when you release the brake. But that's not true. When the pad wears, it becomes thinner, and the piston moves out to compensate. But when the brake is released, the piston retracts only a little, just enough to remove the pressure from the pad. You can't even see it. When the pads are replaced, the ...


2

The rubber brake hose that goes to the caliper needs replacing. Internal damage in the hose will prevent fluid pressure from dropping when you release the brakes, causing the brake to stay engaged.


2

Brake pads should be replaced in pairs, that is to make sure you get even braking action. Calipers do not need to be replaced in pairs I would suspect anyone telling you that wants to rip you off. A broken bleed screw is not a reason to replace a caliper unless the remains cannot be removed, even then a reconditioned one would be my solution, and only on the ...


1

You need to speak to an engineering firm, either that or buy a set of easy outs. When I've snapped off bleed screws on VW's in the past, I've always had success at removing the remains of the snapped bleed screw by sending an easy out (screw extractor) down the bit that's left. If you can't extract the snapped bleed screw this way, speak to an engineering ...


1

The calipers do not always need to be replaced in pairs. If the shop looked at the calipers they may have determined that the odds of getting the bleeders out is too low. Depending on the shops hourly rate they may have determined that it is more cost effective to just replace the calipers. Sometimes this is a liability decision. If the caliper is overheated ...


1

The heat is happening because the caliper is not retracting properly. Normally, I'd suggest replacing the caliper - they're cheap on most (not high performance) cars. However, you state that the you replaced the caliper. Did you verify that the piston(s) in the new caliper move freely? If you're buying aftermarket calipers, there's a decent chance that ...


1

I know your pain, I've been there before! Firstly, buy new bolts, as even if you get that one out intact, you won't want to re-use it! When I had this problem (on a Subaru Forester), I got a kit that had new bolts, slide pins and gaiters, and replaced the lot. You've then got a few options... You've tried WD-40, but that's not always the best thing - you ...


1

If there is a big difference in the effort required to retract the piston I would replace the caliper. Prior to doing so I would verify the issue isn't a bad brake hose. It doesn't happen often but sometimes a hose fails internally. The high pressure created by the master cylinder forces fluid in but the pressure isn't released when the pedal is released. ...


1

What you are describing sounds like one or both of your rear brake calipers (assuming that the emergency brake acts on the rear brakes on that car) is sticking or that the emergency brake is not releasing fully. If you put your hand close to the rear wheels after driving you'll probably notice that one or both of the wheels is noticeably hot – maybe even hot ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible