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11

ABSOLUTELY Yes, when you do any major work to the front suspension, you need to have the alignment done. Even though the parts are "basically" the same, they are not exact. Newer parts will be tighter than old (less deflection and no wear), so will put the alignment into a different position. The only thing you are going to cause by not getting the ...


7

Its not uncommon for the control arm bushings on many Hondas/ Acuras to expire quickly. It is however a bit dangerous to drive with them if they are starting to wear down or dry rot. They harden when this happens and cause other components on your suspension and sub-frame to fail. The lateral and vertical shaking of your car will cause something to give ...


5

In the seldom cases I saw them the manual advised to use soapy water to install them as petroleum based lubes degrade rubber. Normally grease is included on items that need it. Make sure to torque down the bushings carrier as the stabilizer bar is in the "work" position, that is the position the stabilizer bar has when the loaded (normally only the driver) ...


5

Bushings are used to hold the ends of the motor shaft aligned. The motor shaft goes into the bushing and spins inside of it. You can see the bushing and the shaft in this image and get a good idea of how it works:


4

While it does look like a bump stop, I can’t see anything that it can bump against. According to this page, part number 34-970A is a ‘dynamic damper’. Presumably it is some kind of harmonic damper to remove resonant vibrations from the suspension components. Is it a lump of metal mounted on rubber?


3

These do need replacing. As you suggested the top one is blown out (damaged, anyway). I doubt the reason was due to the tie rod ends, though. Tie rod ends keep the wheels going in the right direction. The sway bar helps to keep the vehicle level during cornering. The reason these are worn out sooner than expected is because whoever put them on there, ...


3

If this is going to be a permanent installation, I'd go about doing two things: At every mounting bolt, put a grommet/bushing between the safe and the floor of the truck. This will provide a bit of cushioning for the safe to ride on, keeping the safe up off of the floor itself. This in turn will help prevent rattles down the road. Once the mounting bolts ...


3

Short answer, yes. If it were possible to change it without removing the transmission, it's not going to be any easier. I don't recall off the top of my head if that is a bushing or a bearing but I am assuming you are talking about the one for the flywheel. You need to remove the transmission, you do not need to pull the engine per the service manual. If ...


3

That looks to be like a broken lateral swaybar lock. It's supposed to keep the sway bar from moving side-to-side through the bushing (so that its only motion is torsional). You tend to see this in the aftermarket for increasing suspension performance, like here.


3

That is the way Honda does a lot of their suspension parts. Take for instance, the part below. It isn't sold with bushings, but rather as a complete unit. This is the complete A-Arm from the front end kit for your Jazz (called a "Fit" here in the US). With this in mind, I don't think they are telling you anything out of the ordinary, though it does sound ...


3

Some people call plain bearings bushings The etymology can be different based upon geography. If you have a 'bushing' in your engine it can commonly refer to a crankshaft plain bearing or a connecting rod plan bearing. Here is the wiki on 'bushing'. A plain bearing that is missing out of an engine would be unusual. To remove a crankshaft plain bearing ...


3

Most control arm bushings require some type of mechanical or hydraulic press to install then in to the control arm. If you don't have access to a press you will have to pay someone to do it. This requires you to remove the arm and bring it somewhere. The cost in labor is likely going raise the cost to higher than the price of the arm with the bushing ...


2

Depending on your jurisdiction, it may be illegal. In the UK, the condition of these "dust covers" is now inspected and any degradation is considered a fail. When you consider the cost to replace these as opposed to having them fail during operation, I don't think there is a good argument not replace them.


2

If it's the control arm bushings, you should notice that the wheel itself shifts a bit backward in the wheel well. It certainly is bad for other components as well as vehicle handling because you get instantly outwards toe angle on your wheel. If it is the bushing, get it replaced.


2

If in doubt, replace it - it'll be a lot better for your peace of mind! Plus, as Steve says, it may be illegal in your jurisdiction and /or fail any roadworthyness test - and if you were in an accident because it failed, and they could prove you knew about it beforehand, they'd throw the book at you... I'd also get the alignment of the various suspension ...


2

It is possibly a rubber bump stop. It purpose it to stop suspension movement before things get to a point of metal to metal contact or the shock bottoms out. If the piece just rusted off you wouldn't realize it until the suspension bottomed out. It is possible that the rough riding you did compressed the suspension to the point the bump stop hit and was ...


2

No, you can buy and replace the worn bushings, either from the Dealer, local parts store or performance parts sellers. https://www.startpage.com/do/search?query=2000+Lexus+RX300.+rack+bushings&cat=web&pl=chrome&language=english


1

Braided hoses expand less than all-rubber ones, because metal which surrounds the braided hose expands less than rubber. When applied to brake hoses, this makes a difference in high performance driving where high brake pedal pressures are involved - due to reduced expansion of the lines, brake pedal feels more linear and consistent. This is especially ...


1

The strut top bearing can fail which can cause a creaking sound when the steering is turned, so try lifting the hood and listen to the top of the inner wheel arches. The bearings are usually part of a mount. I believe the ones on you car look like this - To remove them you will need some coil spring compressors. When I have done this job previously on ...


1

Not all aftermarket parts are created equal, so they are not always an exact fit. Lubricate the moving surfaces (bushing-to-bar) with silicone grease and most likely this setup will last very reasonable length of time.


1

Boil the part in water which should make it pliable enough to fit it into the rod end.


1

Yes, you can use bolts instead of rivets. You probably don't need to use high grade bolts – the original rivets need to be soft enough that you can peen the end to secure them in place. Besides cost, the big difference between a rivet (especially a shop installed rivet) and a bolt is that once installed the rivet is very unlikely to come loose. The caveat ...


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