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Your best bet is to check the various online parts catalogues such as Mintex, etc... Compare the image and dimensions in any of these catalogues to the pads physically in the car at the moment. What you'll then be able to do is cross-reference the catalogue part number to the manufacturers part number and match that up to the EBC catalogue. I should point ...


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I had to hammer out the rear pads on a Kia Rio. And the replacements were very tight going in. Wagner TQ, not cheap stuff. The caliper was cleaned & new clips were used. I ground down the ears on the new pads to make them fit. No wonder I barely got 60K miles on rear brakes. And a very lightweight car that is driven a lot on the highway.


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This does depend on the grade of pad and the original thickness of the disc. Go back 10 or more years and discs were thicker as the drive for fuel consumption and total weight was not as severe, which means if they can fit thinner discs with a reasonable life they will... I have just had to replace discs and pads after 70000km - the pads needed changing ...


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There is an alternative to replacing the discs, depending on how much is left on the lipped discs. It's possible to have your existing discs turned on a lathe to remove the lips and present a flat braking surface. I don't know where you live but there are manufacturers who make "on-car" brake lathes and local garages with this technology won't charge much ...


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Pretty much all cars have this, and depending on the brake use and the brake pad compound it may wear out the brake rotor too. It really depends on how bad the lip is, usually manufacturers release certain specs and also wear specs found in repair manuals. As a rule of thump, if the lip is more than 2mm I would consider replacing the brake rotor too. ...


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As you already have changed the caliper two times, i believe it is because of bad brake hose (brake line). Clogged rubber brake hose push piston out but did not let it come back because oil is not going back in the hose.


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In my rather extensive experience there are two major causes of pulsating brakes. I maintain a number of vehicles for a fixed user base and knowing their habits and driving conditions has helped identify patterns, particularly with respect to brake issues. The first and most common cause is "cheap rotors" which is hard to define, but usually the least ...


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