10

No harm done On contemporary vehicles there is no direct mechanical linkage between the gear selector and the automatic transmission. Instead, the gear selector selects a "state" (e.g. N, D, R, 1, 2...) which is relayed electronically to the transmission controller and acted upon if the circumstances are deemed favorable.


10

Should be no problem at all. The manual is being overly cautious, since the usual case for shifting from neutral into drive is when you're stopped hold the brake will prevent the car from starting to move until you release the brake. But when you're already moving there is no need to hold the brake.


6

Since the brakes stay on, it could be the brake booster is assisting when it shouldn't. To verify this, you could disconnect the vacuum pipe that goes to the booster to see if the pedal the raises. You will need to cover the end of the pipe while you do this to stop anything being sucked into the pipe. Another thing that could identify the booster being ...


4

Above the pedal should be a button, with 2 wires coming out of it. When your pedal is up, the button will be pressed all the way down, as you press the pedal, be button will release. At some point this button turns on your tail lights. I know the one on my truck is adjustable (because I've had to adjust it). In this case, you remove the wires from the ...


4

What you're describing sounds like the pulsing feedback that the ABS (antilock braking system) provides when it actuates on a slippery surfaces. The best way that I can describe it is as a roughness or rumble in the brake pedal, usually it is accompanied by a matching (for lack of a better word) sound. There may also be a annunciator light in the instrument ...


3

It may as well be that you went over a little rock or bump and it got translated to a bigger feeling because the brake booster was not operating. I wouldn't worry about it since your mechanic thinks everything is OK and car works fine otherwise. The stiffness is very normal. Once you turn off your engine there is still vacuum in the brake booster, but if you ...


2

If the pedal is so hard that it has little effect on the brakes it is most likely a vacuum issue. On diesels there is a separate vacuum pump connected to the brake servo via a pipe. Check the pipe work and servo for any obvious leaks. If none are present pull the pipe off the pump when the engine in running and check for vacuum. You can do this my using a ...


2

I think Paulster2 is on the right track. If you cannot find the spring possibly it broke, fell off and is gone. Might be worth a trip to the Ford store have a partsman look up all the brake linkage parts, there will be a picture showing where the spring goes, what it looks like, etc. At least if there is no spring required, the partsman would be able to ...


2

It definitely sounds like your brake light switch isn't activating when it should. I like the list of options presented by rpmerf in his answer. It's definitely something you can tackle if you have a couple of hours to spare. Here's a hands-on approach to figure out what's going on: Push the driver's seat back as far as it will go and put something like a ...


2

I'm sure this is normal. There will be a little free play in the linkages to the master cylinder/ brake fluid compressing in the brake lines so the brakes will not be applying until you push the pedal further any way. It reduces the risk of your brake lights flickering while driving if pedal is bumped. But I am not a mechanic. I've driven truck for many ...


2

I think your best bet would be to isolate the shift interlock control module from the brake switch using a relay. Looking at a pin voltage chart you can see that the park position switch in gear supplies B+ to the module, the brake switch (applied) provides B+ to the module and the control unit grounds the shift lock solenoid. I'd probably use a 5 pin ...


2

I think if you had a new Corvette or BMW, or whatever you drove saw significant track time, I would be concerned. There should be no harm on mixing "street" pads of different materials. (But never on the same axle, just front/rear...) There simply is not enough difference in those two pad types to notice any difference in braking, unless you are driving ...


1

Welcome to MVM & Repair! The problem you're experiencing is caused by one of three things: Brake pads are missing, brake disks are missing or brakes shoes (inside the brake drums) are not adjusted properly. Make sure the brake pads are in the right place and that there's not a huge hap between the pad's surface and the brake disk. If the rear brakes are ...


1

You didn't mention the car make and model, but I'm assuming your car uses a vacuum powered brake booster. (See below image) It uses vacuum power from the engine to multiply the force applied to the brake pedal. If the brake booster fails or if there is a vacuum leak, it will not work properly, resulting in a hard brake pedal. The brake booster (black), the ...


1

Several things can cause a spongy brake pedal. If the brake fluid is old, say more than 5-7 years old, it may contain to much water. Brake fluid gradually absorbs water from the air. If enough water gets absorbed it can boil when the brake fluid gets hot. This produces air bubbles in the fluid giving the same symptoms as the system needing to be bled. Once ...


1

The biting point of a brake pedal can vary from one model vehicle to another. Car and Driver magazine often comments on that specific location when performing vehicle reviews. Some models have what they consider excessive travel before engaging, while others have a short, immediate actuation. If your brakes are solid once the actuation point is reached, you ...


1

Im not a mechanic but any brake that is having issues may cause skidding (due to terrible brake performance), less stopping power and may hurt your brakes, rotors, calipers. My SUV Avura MDX I failed to change my brakes because they were so bad that when it came to emergency braking my screw that held my caliper came lose and the caliper came loose and i ...


1

I haven't looked at my Silvy, but would bet there are bushings at the top of the brake pedal arm which controls this movement. Take a look and see if they're worn out (or even non-existent at this point). Replacing these should firm the pedal back into its correct alignment and travel directions.


1

It seems if the pedal pivot was rusted up. Booster helped but did not fix it. Sprayed the pivot with PB Blaster and it was better. Not great but better. Thank you for everyone's help!


1

It's possible you got used to the feeling of the pedal with some air in the system. If the air was flushed out when the brakes were 'bled' this would account for the additional firmness you feel. As long as the brake booster is working and the brakes were installed correctly, the firm brake pedal is a good thing. Your parking brake is another story. It is a ...


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