10

The only way to know if a rotor needs to be replaced is measuring it with a micrometer and comparing that to the manufacturers specifications, so, no, we can't tell you if it needed to be replaced. However, since this was your first brake job I seriously doubt they needed to be replaced. Common practices is to "turn" rotors when doing a brake job. The ...


8

What is a freely spinning wheel? Of course, you should be able to spin the wheel by hand, but beneath the brake, bearing and transmission can apply lots of drag. My rear wheels do about 1.5 to 2 turns, my front wheels not more than half a turn when I put them in rotation by hand. While it's the same for the front wheel of my mother's car, its rear wheels ...


8

Here's a rough approach that should work regardless of vehicle You will need to know the current brake pad thickness the thickness of a brand new brake pad how much mileage you've put on the car since the last brake pad change. The formula Mileage per mm = mileage since last brake change / ( brand new thickness - present thickness ) In ...


7

You cannot tell from just looking at them (in most cases) ... you have to measure the thickness of the rotor to see if they need replaced. Also, it's hard to tell from the picture how deep the wear is on the rotor. The grooves could be 1mm deep, or 5mm deep ... it's really hard to tell. It really comes down to how thick the rotors would be after machining. ...


6

To my mind, a wheel should spin freely when spun on the jack. A little noise is acceptable but if the wheel is clearly being slowed down excessively or is particularly hot after use, something is not right. As regards causes for brake drag, there do indeed include seized or sticking pistons but could also include sticky or corroded caliper slides (the pins,...


5

You can perform this action with a number of 3rd party diagnostic tools such as VCDS, Carista and OBDeleven. My uncle had some success removing the electrical mechanism from the rear of the caliper too but I'd suggest against this option given the choice between taking things to bits and buying a diagnostic tool.


4

So it could be a number of things: the pads could need grease on the NON-braking side (i.e. the side that doesn't touch the rotors), the caliper pins could be sticking, the brake pad guide plates could be dirty and causing the pads to stick, or your caliper piston itself could be sticking slightly. Greasing the backs of the pads is pretty self-explanatory. ...


4

The brake rotors are damaged beyond repair by rust. The vent holes are full of rust. This causes the rotors to not cool well enough which can lead to burned spots, warping, pad material overheat and/or pad material transfer to the rotor surface. The pad hanging out over the outer diameter a little bit is not a problem for brake effectiveness. It can lead ...


3

Since you have replaced all the calipers, the most likely issue is that the slider mechanism that the caliper rides on is seizing. Each brake caliper holds 2 pads, if it is the slider that is at fault, then only one of the pads will be wearing down quickly. Is that what is happening?


3

It would appear the rear brake pads do not have the sensors. Here are a couple of images from RockAuto.com showing the front, then the rear pads: You'll notice in the first picture the wire/sensor and the slots in the brake pads to put the wire/sensor. You don't see any provision for it in the rear brake pads.


3

As @SolarMike stated, you don't want to do this. It will definitely create an imbalance in the Force, and you'll find the Dark Side very quickly. If you did want to do this, you'd have to purchase (at least) two sets of brake pads, anyway. So why not just purchase both sets and try both sets for one month each. Clean the wheels completely, then put one set ...


3

You should NOT do this : for pads to produce less dust, the materials in the friction compound are different so changing the braking characteristics such as brake fade, heat dissipation, wear rate and friction coefficient, all of which lead to an imbalance in braking force across the front axle. This imbalance could easily throw you in the ditch (if you are ...


3

This happens a lot. You are probably cocking the pads just a bit, or perhaps there are some burrs on the caliper slots. A very few swipes with a bastard cut file on the pad tipsis acceptable, as well as tapping the pad into place with a small deadblow hammer. Usually, once the pad is square against the rotor, the problem lessens considerably and is no ...


3

Anything that has the manufacturer's logo on it will command a premium. Brakes are brakes. As long as they are made to fit your vehicle you will be fine. I've been running 3rd-party brake pads and rotors forever. They stop the car. Keep this in mind: "You get what you pay for" is what they are counting on you to remember while shopping.


3

Squealing can be caused by a pattern of grooves in the rotor that make it look like an old vinyl record. The thickness of the rotor makes no difference on squealing, so even if there was plenty of meat left on the rotor it still needed servicing. Depending on how thick the rotors were you might have been able to machine them instead of replacing them - but ...


3

Er, not so much. I'm assuming we're talking Motorcycle here, right? What if there is a slight leak in the brake lines somewhere? You'd be losing fluid and that would NOT be a good indicator of brake pad wear. Different vehicles have different size brake actuators, with accompanying different volumes of fluid to account for as the brake pads wear down over ...


3

Provided that the other disc is still within acceptable tolerances with regards to width, you can replace a single disc. I personally prefer to replace discs as a pair on the basis that if one side is worn close to its useful life, the other is likely in a similar state. You could look at having the discs turned on a brake lathe as an alternative to ...


2

If this is a vehicle that is driven regularly I would check that the rear brakes are working correctly. When things are working correctly the pads should remove the slight rust that forms. That is a lot of rust for a vehicle that is driven frequently. You can do a simple test by raising the rear wheels. While an assistant steps on the brakes see if you can ...


2

I suspect the most likely problem here is the caliper slide pins sticking - check that they move freely in the carrier. If they don't, remove them, clean out the hole, and fit new pins, grease and boots (usually all available as a set from any decent brake part supplier). While you're at it, clean up the parts of the caliper that the pads slide against, and ...


2

Perfectly safe, if the brake job was done correctly. Heat is fine - the pads will be burning off the anti-rust coating. Remember to bed the pads in correctly; the following content is not mine, it's from http://brakeperformance.com/bedding-in-rotors.php Perform 3-4 medium stops from 45mph. Slightly more aggressive than normal braking. You don't need to ...


2

No, there is no need to 'scrape' the pads in preparation for the new rotors. After replacing pads or rotors, you should always 'bed' or 'burnish' the new parts according to the pad manufacturer instructions. This process usually involves several hard stops from 50ish mph to get your rotors and pads up to temperature, then driving for ~10 minutes without ...


2

Replacing the pads would be best practice. However it is not mandatory that you replace them. Be aware that if you reuse the old pads, they may take some time to wear to the surface of the new discs for the first 100 miles or so. If it were me, I'd replace the pads and junk the used ones.


2

Many if not most OEM brake pads will also contain any original pad shims or anti squeal plates. While your old ones may be reusable many times they are not. It has been my experience that some vehicles (Honda in particular) have fewer squealing issues with the OEM pads. Even when purchasing aftermarket pads the more expensive pad sets will contain shims or ...


2

I think if you had a new Corvette or BMW, or whatever you drove saw significant track time, I would be concerned. There should be no harm on mixing "street" pads of different materials. (But never on the same axle, just front/rear...) There simply is not enough difference in those two pad types to notice any difference in braking, unless you are driving ...


2

According to this website, you should consider changing your pads between 3.2-6.4mm of thickness. If the pad is below 3.2mm, it's pretty much a must.


1

Welcome to Mechanics SE! It sounds to me like you have a sticky caliper that is preventing the pads in that corner of the vehicle from fully releasing when you're releasing the brake. This could be caused by the slide pins in the caliper being corroded or needing lubricating or it could be an issue with the piston within the caliper itself. One other ...


1

The shop did not wear away your brake pad. While they, arguably, should have noticed the worn pads, you wanted a cheaper job and asked them to do the tires which they did. The fact that they have a tire balancing machine is not a sign of a bad job or shop. To remove the caliper I would suggest using a pry bar to force the pads/pistons back some and then ...


1

My first strong suggestion that you need a stand to go with the jack - apologies if it is hidden behind the hub assembly. You need to fit two new rotors with new pads on both sides for the front. If you don't, the braking performance will be out of balance and could cause you to loose control.


1

OEM parts have the reputation to be the most suited parts for the vehicle. There are important scenarios where somebody wants to use the most reputable parts instead of alternatives. Think In-house maintenance for fleet vehicles: There is not only the maintenance work but some also needs to comply with the (often informal) company culture. Should there be ...


1

As other people in the comments said it's likely caliper related, Either a bent caliper mount or a sticking caliper piston, either way the pad is being constantly pressed against the disc and being worn down as a result of that. One way i was taught to check for such an issue is try touching the wheel nuts/bolts after a long(ish) drive, if there too hot to ...


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