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Basically, there is no difference as far as what you can use. Put away all of the hype language on the bottle and focus on the DOT3. This is the main standard you need to look at. (Here's some easy brake fluid reading for you.) If your vehicle calls for DOT3, you should be able to use any one of the three you have listed. If it required DOT4, DOT5, or DOT5.1,...


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The Bosch Automotive Handbook confirms that mineral-oil-based fluids are not hygroscopic: Mineral-oil fluids (ISO 7308) The great advantage of mineral-oil-based fluids is the fact that they are not hygroscopic, so the boiling point does not drop due to moisture absorption. It also makes clear that mineral-oil fluids are incompatible with systems designed ...


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According to Pascal's law, pressure must everywhere be equal. Pressure is defined as a force on a surface. Pressure equals force devided by area P = F / a. That is, the area of the master and slave cylinders (those inside the calipers or brake drums). So, brake pressure is only affected by the area of the master- and slave cylinders and the force that's ...


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You didn't mention the car make and model, but I'm assuming your car uses a vacuum powered brake booster. (See below image) It uses vacuum power from the engine to multiply the force applied to the brake pedal. If the brake booster fails or if there is a vacuum leak, it will not work properly, resulting in a hard brake pedal. The brake booster (black), the ...


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