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Since the brakes stay on, it could be the brake booster is assisting when it shouldn't. To verify this, you could disconnect the vacuum pipe that goes to the booster to see if the pedal the raises. You will need to cover the end of the pipe while you do this to stop anything being sucked into the pipe. Another thing that could identify the booster being ...


2

Since that brake booster is very vital in the function of your brakes, I would HIGHLY suggest just replacing it; You could even get one from a junkyard depending on the year. Once you get water into the brake booster, depending on the quality and coatings of the metal used; You can possibly rot the diaphragm or rust out the inside. I just recently worked ...


2

It is possible to do this without removing the intake manifold. Move all the hoses, wires and cables out of the way. Move the clutch reservoir and bracket if it has a manual transmission. Pull the booster out and then rotate it clockwise about 90 degrees so that the operating rod is facing the fender. It is a tight squeeze but it can be done.


2

While having some one depress the brakes inspect each of the rubber flex hoses at the wheel corners. Look for any sign of bulging. Hoses age with repeated expansion and contraction form brakes being applied. This eventually causes bulges in the inner hose part which requires extra fluid to make up for the extra space and hence a slow petal depression. The ...


2

The test you conducted checks to see if the brake booster is working, and not leaking with the pedal released. The vacuum boost section has a leak and will not seal on the push rod when the pedal is depressed. The leak is not sufficient to prevent booster operation, so there will be no other obvious indication. You can disconnect the vacuum hose at the ...


2

I think Paulster2 is on the right track. If you cannot find the spring possibly it broke, fell off and is gone. Might be worth a trip to the Ford store have a partsman look up all the brake linkage parts, there will be a picture showing where the spring goes, what it looks like, etc. At least if there is no spring required, the partsman would be able to ...


1

The check valve is there to maintain the vacuum after the engine is turned off or during periods of wide open throttle where there will be little vacuum generated by the engine. So if the vacuum is still there with the engine off, then the check valve is doing its job. Since your brakes are staying on, there must be air getting into the drivers side of the ...


1

The car has a vacuum leak. It may be within the brake booster, or in an external vacuum hose. There may be a bad connection at some joint in the vacuum plumbing, or the booster's internal diaphragm may have failed.


1

Typically in all cars there are certain switches on the pedals depending on the model and the accessories in the car. The brake pedal switch is a standard feature in all modern cars because it is used to be triggered when the brake pedal is pressed. This switch is adjustable like the brake pedal height in the car. It is quite common after such job to be ...


1

You'll need to remove the booster from the fire wall of the vehicle, then drain it out, then use some acetone to clean it out. Let it dry, then re-install. If it continues to work correctly, you're in business. If not, you'll need to buy a new one or at the very least, one from a wrecking yard as a replacement. Unfortunately, you probably won't know if it's ...


1

There is a gasket that sits between the master cylinder and the brake booster. It is a thick rubber gasket that fills the space between the two parts and fits snugly around the master cylinder shaft. part #- 46185-SE0-003


1

As another user mentioned, you will need to be absolutely sure that fluid isnt leaking from any other location at all. If the hose burst caused the current cylinder to empty out, you will want to try a bench bleed, also as suggested, followed by rechecking all of the calipers for air. To check for fluid in the booster, you could try a wire hanger, or perhaps ...


1

You are losing vacuum somewhere in the induction system and the brake booster assist is making up for the loss. The first thing to check is the PCV valve and its tubing, if your car has it. Check the EGR valve for vac. leak. You can also spray raw, unlit propane from a hand-held torch around the intake manifold gaskets, induction system and vacuum lines ...


1

The hissing of air you're hearing is likely due to a torn vacuum booster. This isn't a complete disaster but does mean you are not getting the full effect of power brakes. The brake fluid being so low is a little mysterious. Do you see any leaks under your car, either near each wheel or near the master cylinder? It's possible the master cylinder is ...


1

Well, I haven't been able to find anything good. Then best advice I can give is these 2 options: Find what is "factory stock" for the '66 C10, and work your way backward from there. That's not a very viable method I think because the best you're gonna get is a group of possible vehicles. Take it to a brake specialist and see if they can tell you. They ...


1

It seems if the pedal pivot was rusted up. Booster helped but did not fix it. Sprayed the pivot with PB Blaster and it was better. Not great but better. Thank you for everyone's help!


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