Hot answers tagged

40

The easiest, most economical method I can think of is to use Loctite Blue 242. You apply it to the thread, torque it to spec, then within 24 hours it will keep the bolt held in place without issue. If the Blue ever comes loose, you can step up to the Red, which requires heat to bust it loose. It will not come loose without a LOT of effort. NOTE: I have no ...


14

Making threads is done with two tools known as a Tap and a Die. The are sold individually or in sets. To make threads in a hole, you need a tap. Those are the items in the image that look like a cross between a bolt and a drill bit. In fact, that's what they are. As you use the handle to turn them into the hole, the tapered flutes cut threads into the ...


10

They're not bolts, they're studs. You can use a stud extractor if needed but my usual trick is to put two nuts on, tighten one against the other then turn out the stud with the lower bolt. You can apply heat with a blow torch if they aren't shifting or try some releasing fluid such as PlugGas / PB Blaster (being careful not to use heat and flammable ...


9

No, A2 bolt is not safe. You can use the calculator here: http://www.tribology-abc.com/calculators/e3_6b.htm ...for bolts of grade 8.8 and M8 thread. It will say that the maximum tightening torque is 24.11 Nm which is less than 20 ft lbs (which would be 27.11 Nm). Now, the calculator does not have A2 as the grade of bolts, but according to this site: http://...


8

I agree about the Loctite products but a simple lock washer or lock nut might be another possible solution as well (depending on the length of the bolt available). Some handlebars are "secured" within a U shaped clamp with a bolt going through the ends of the "U" to squeeze the clamp down on the handlebar assembly and the harder you ride that bike the more ...


7

Replace bolt and nut Likely, there's no damage to the control arm. 70 to 40 is a big jump, but not likely extremely damaging, in my opinion. However, I would definitely replace the bolt: putting that much strain on it risks reducing the bolt strength such that it could break while you're driving. Replace the bolt, and while your at it, replace the nut as ...


6

The head is probably just rounded off. Hammer a 3/8" socket on or use a 10mm twist socket on it. Maybe heat it or use a penetrating fluid on it as well. Worse comes to worse the head snaps and you have to drill and retap the bolt hole.


6

There is something that bothers me: Handlebar bolts, as safety critical items, aren't supposed to become loose. Either you torqued them wrong (too loose or too tight) or there is something fundamentally wrong with it. I would inspect the bolts / entire assembly and check if The thread is intact and fits the matching hole. Does the issue persist if you ...


5

Duct tape is your friend here, you simply use a piece to cover the back of the ring so the nut can't fall through. The glue will also hold the nut in place while you maneuver it. Another trick worth trying is hot glue. I haven't needed it for auto mechanics but I've used it successfully in the past to keep a bolt or screw in place on a driver or wrench. It ...


5

As @FredWilson says that's a spacer. You can find them in a variety of sizes at most "real" hardware stores (at least you can in the US). The place to look is in the fastener section in the boxes of specialty parts. Failing that you can make them from a length of suitably sized pipe or tubing. Ideally the spacer should be similar in diameter to a washer (...


5

It looks like ViceGrips would have to come in vertically, so you won't have much leverage with just the pliers, but you can use an adjustable wrench or water pump (slip joint) pliers, or maybe even a screwdriver slipped into the opening of the jaws to get some extra torque. You may want to soak the fastener in PB Blaster or Kroil (or whatever your favorite ...


5

In my experience most penetrating oils (PB Blaster is my personal favorite) work well when dealing with iron oxide (rust). They are not as effective with aluminum oxide. A common scenario when working on bicycles is steel hardware stuck in aluminum frames. What works reasonably well in ammonia. Put straight household ammonia in a spray bottle. Soak both ...


4

The tap & die answer is accurate, and as for your concerns about the threads matching, maybe this will help you choose the correct thread type/count so it should be no issue. Threads for screws, bolts and nuts vary due to type & intended application and are very precise. Dies and taps have a numerical indicator on them revealing the size and thread ...


4

Since there is a need to re-torque the fastener, it doesn't make sense to use Loctite. This is true for two reasons (after the Loctite has set): With the Loctite holding the fastener in place, it will give you a false torque reading. The fastener interface (bolt to nut) will not want to move due to the locking action of the Loctite, so it will appear there ...


4

I have also used grease to achieve that - and once the plug is in the correct place, I have held it there with a bar and turned it with the open-ended spanner.


4

If you can replace the bolt with one equipped for use with a lock wire/safety wire (e.g. one with a hole drilled through the bolt head from the side, or possibly a castellated bolt), and you can find something to tie the end of the safety wire to, this is one of the most reliable ways of keeping a bolt in place which is subjected to vibration stress. (This ...


4

I have to agree with some of the other posters: Something is not right with the fastening, and/or the proper clamping pressure is not being achieved, perhaps due to under-torque. That said, I would rank the simplest solutions from best to worst as follows: castellated nut with cotter pin, hitch pin, safety wire on nut or bolt head adhesive threadlocker "...


4

Per SolarMikes suggestion, I drilled out the hole equivalent to M6 and retapped the threads.


4

It looks like your socket is Torx, but your spanner (and the bolt) are the newer Torx Plus design. Torx Plus was introduced in abut 1990, when the original Torx patents were going to expire. It has an improved shape particularly for high-torque applications. Standard Torx drivers will "sort of work" on Torx PLus fasteners, but they are a loose fit. ...


3

The thread locking compound and/or lock-washer are excellent suggestions assuming you're not loosing clamping force due to bolt stretch, bolt length (too short or bottoming), threads pulling or martial softness of the clamping surfaces. I'd check all of these things out because bolt "torque" does NOT equal clamping force which is what holds the handle bar ...


3

Soak in WD40 or similar release fluid for a few days. Heat up the stud with oxy acetylene, cherry red. When the colour's gone, apply more WD. Use a stud extractor if possible. After turning half a turn, apply more fluid, screw back in and gradually unscrew in this manner. Rather like tapping a hole in reverse. Keep up the treatment until out. It will not ...


3

According to this Wikipedia article, WD-40 should probably work good. It also says to stay away from multi-weight oils (due to the detergents and other factors), but single weight oils should work just fine (like SAE10 or 20, if you can find them). According to the article, there are four things which cutting oil does for you: Keeps the workpiece at a ...


3

Torque to specifications then further tighten to align nearest slot in nut to hole, never back nut off to align hole.


3

Well, if its a car suspension, im sure there is a toque spec. But in general tighten so cutter pin will be in the middle. But if its something like a wheel bearing you have to make sure the wheel can spin and not bind up due to over tightening.


3

The hardware is different depending on where it's at. The four bed bolts will most likely have washers/nuts on the other side, while the eight in the tailgate will have captured nuts of some kind backing them. The thing you need to ask yourself is: Will I ever need to access these bolts? The answer is most likely yes, at least for the ones on the tailgate. ...


3

If the bolt is just needed to keep the brake cable from dangling around and has absolutely no critical function then I'd try to clamp the bracket (perhaps by some U-bolt) to the control arm and forget about the broken bolt. Update: Regarding your request for drilling: Your stated scenario indicates that you experienced something called "work hardening". ...


3

Given the mess so far, I think you will have to remove the arm and set it up in a vice so the it can be drilled with a sharp bit at low speed and at a slow advance rate. If that fails then you may well have to take it to a (good) machine shop which has a Spark Erosion Machine which will be able to remove the broken drill bits you have left in there. Once ...


3

The easiest, most sure way to get this out would be by welding a nut onto the end of the bolt. This will do two things for you. First, it will give you something to turn with as when the nut is welded to the bolt, it will become just like it was (for the most part) when the original head of the bolt was present. Secondly, during the welding process, what is ...


2

Reputable sources (e.g. Haynes, Chilton's, Alldata, etc) are paying a licensing fee to republish OEM information, or at the very least asking permission. Haynes is probably the only "paper" DIY repair manual source left, and typically they only publish information on older popular vehicles, where the income stream from the OEM manual is little or no ...


2

I wouldn't trust the bolts you currently have to be right for the job, and I would definitely not replace them with some bolts you found at the local hardware store, and you don't have to. You should start by finding out the Yamaha part number, googling "Yamaha [year] [model] engine mount bolts" should bring up all sorts of useful information. Once you ...


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