3

Hard to say for certain what will work without knowing what the substance actually is - washing up liquid is normally pretty good for stripping off most waxes, but as you say it's not done the trick here. You could stay on the same tack but up the firepower a bit by going with something like Meguiars Super Degreaser - I've used this to clean polishing pads ...


2

You could sand the rust out and spray paint the area to protect it from rusting again. All those cracks and the exposed metal on the left are also prone to oxidation, so you might want to consider sanding and spray painting them too. Since the area is small, nail polish could be a well suited substitute for spray painting. The finish won't be very good, but ...


2

You don't lose anything by popping it out, that's probably the first step a specialist would do anyway. It's not a bad dent, so it may get it good enough for you and you don't need a repair.


2

You'd have to lightly sand the clear coat so the new clear coat and adhere


1

MIG is much easier to learn than stick , especially for thin steel/low amperage. Gasless requires flux cored wire to get an adequate weld . The ductility and toughness are not as good for flux cored as gas but good enough for sheet metal. I suggest getting a unit that can use gas or that gas can be added on later.


1

For thin sheet aka car body panels I would go with the gasless mig (the wire produces its own gas via the flux it is treated with, so you have to get gasless mig wire which is more expensive...). I have used both and made many things with stick - even dung forks using old broken lorry halfshafts and 8" angle with 6mm rods to get the runs down faster. Would ...


1

At the risk of sounding like a prank, I'm going to suggest something I've used many times to remove wax that was unintentionally applied to cast plastic parts on cars, which can suffer from similar staining from typical car wax (i.e. bumpers, door molding, plastic mirror trim, etc). I learned this from a pro detailer many years ago. Try a dab of peanut ...


1

The problem is, you needed to paint the entire panel. Usually you do this from seam to seam or panel to panel, whatever will work. You need to scuff the entire panel, then mask off what you don't want to paint and go from there. You obviously found out what it looks like when you've just painted a portion of it ... realistically, what you did paint looks ...


1

I'm pretty sure it's related to your sunroof. There is a set of drain going down in the B pillar and one in the A pillar. They drain in the door opening between the two door hinges. Try blowing compress air in the drain (mainly back in your case) and see if that fix the problem. If not the drain main have disconnected from the plug. You can read more about ...


1

I do have to ask.. what caused that issue? Was the vehicle ever involved in an accident? Generally, that can be adjusted with a wrench. The mechanism which controls that motion has should have slots designed to allow for some adjustment. Each 'hinge' will have four bolts or screws, two on the deck, and two on the sheet metal body. You'll have to inspect ...


1

Im certain it can be done but if a company doesn't already have a mass market solution then im also certain it would be cheaper to buy the car you want... More than likely it's going to be a massive amount of custom work. Since you're asking you wont be able to do it yourself and it will be extremely expensive.


1

Yes, it would. Chip off any loose paint around the gap and the crack, then go over it with a wire brush (the sort that fits in a power drill or angle grinder will make quick work of it). Paint it with the POR15 - I think they usually recommend two coats. When dry, a quick spray over with body colour will improve it as well, or just use a cheap generic white ...


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