9

Just for further elaboration, do you mean a line between your new coat of paint and the previous coat of paint? Is it possible you supply a picture please? Over time, the original paint of a vehicle fades and oxidises. Barring extreme cases, this process is usually not noticeable unless there is a new coat of paint to compare it to. The cut-off lines you ...


8

Bodywork is something that cannot be rushed. While others are suggesting chemicals that may be suited for this application, it is not necessarily going to be a solution to your problem. The most important part of bodywork/painting is preparation and cleanliness. I cannot stress this enough. When applying bondo, fibreglass, spot putty, primer, paint, ...


4

You already got some good advice on buffing and polishing. Here are some tips to hiding paint lines and minimizing their noticeability: Always provide the paint code and the VIN when you have paint mixed. There are almost always variations in batch and manufacturers make slight changes to color formulas over the years, so paint code is not always enough ...


3

You need to use a flexible body filler specifically intended for polyurethane bumpers. It looks like the filler you used has detached from the substrate due to flexing (which could be solely due to temperature and not impact). The filler you used was for small dent repair on non-flexible metal panels. Also, I don't know how big of an area you filled but the ...


3

Yeah you can add a flex agent if you think that's the case or you can make sure it's sanded rough and then do like 3 or 4 layers of paint. You could also sand it down further, and cover it with fiberglass or epoxy resin, then sand that and paint it.


3

Bodywork can be really fun or it can make you cry. There are some general rules to adhere to. Rule 1 - Don't use anything over 400 grit on the plastic bodywork like the front bumper. It will scar it up. Rule 2 - Put the power tools away when you are dealing with the flexible plastic, unless it's a sander (not a grinder) with 400 grit or finer SP. Rule 3 ...


2

The orbital sander would work fine. Use paint stripper only on metal body parts because it would dissolve plastic parts. Strip any area of paint that you intend to work on. Body filler won't hold well on a smooth paint surface. Start with about 180 grit to strip the paint. Sand a reasonable area around the ding as well, 2 or 3 inches is fine. Make sure you ...


2

Personally i would be looking at epoxy resin, fibre-glass or similar. If the panel or body can be rotated or oriented so it is near flat it will make things easier. Epoxy has a number of advantages. It bonds well to many surfaces, and can be sanded and painted. Its less likely to crack than bondo/bog/filler and can be added in layers. Welding or ...


1

I'd plug weld the hole then dress the weld and lead load it or add a light skim of P38. If a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well. All other methods tend not to last as holes that have been simply bridged and filled without welding tend to "drop out" and show through the paintwork after a few months.


1

Looking at your pictures, I don't think you need any filler. Just sand down and feather the areas, use a high build urethane primer to fill in any low spots, and paint. If you need a little filler (I highly doubt you will) icing works well for shallow scratches. Another thought I just had, if the scratches were really deep, you could fill them in/build the ...


1

It's great you have attempted to have a go yourself to repair your bumper, and sounds like you did a really good job for your first try....but the reason for the lip is poor masking technique, so just sanding, and repainting won't achieve much if you mask up again the same way....you will get another line. When you mask, roll the tape along it's length up ...


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