10

In very cold climates there are electric heaters that replace the dip stick. They are plugged into an AC outlet and because they reach the oil pan they can apply heat directly to the oil. That way the oil doesn't get cold to the point where it totally looses it's ability to keep your engine protected at start up. It's plugging in that electric heater that "...


7

From the second link you posted, the manufacturers literature on the third page, second question reads as follows; Do not run your engine while the engine heater is plugged in. This will create an air bubble around the element which will then cause the element to burn out prematurely. That seems to be a pretty conclusive answer.


6

Modern engine preheaters are usually made of flexible heater mats, similar to those used in seat heaters. These are glued to the bottom of the oil pan. This heats the engine oil. This thins the oil allowing it to pump much more quickly which has two effects. 1) The crankshaft spins faster allowing faster start. 2) The oil reaches the bearings much faster....


4

A car battery's power will drop with temperature. It would be my first port of call. Since the car ran fine when you had it jumpstarted with the help of your friend, I would have the battery tested to make sure that it can deliver sufficient juice to the starter.


4

It depends on the how cold it gets where you live in Canada, but usually it would be a sane idea to have one. I lived in the north-west corner of Montana growing up. It would normally reach below freezing, but above 0°F (-17°C) most of the winter nights. Only when the forecast was to be below this would we "plug our cars in" for the night. As long as your ...


4

(EDIT: Since the OP told me he is in Canada, I will update my post accordingly.) Since your car is a Canada car, it more than likely came with one due to the cold Canadian winters. Doing some checks online, it appears the factory block heater is locate at the passenger side front of the engine, just below the exhaust manifold. It screws into the block. Here ...


3

I added a Honda(tm) OEM block heater to my 2009 Civic Hybrid. I was living in Kansas at the time and pre-heating the engine seemed to help with mileage an time until heat available on very cold mornings. On the 2009 HCH there is a plug screwed into the back of the block just below the head, on the passenger side. unscrew the plu and replace with the ...


2

I also live in Canada, southwestern part. I would suggest simply paying attention to the weather / forecast. If it is going to be below -10C, be prepared to plug in. Vehicles will probably start down to the -20C's, but cold starts are damaging. Probably need to watch the weather more than January and February depending where you live.


2

I know of two block heaters which actually get the job done (there is a kind which attaches to the oil pan to heat the oil, but I do not see this working very well). The first type is the kind which replaces a freeze plug in the engine block. I believe this is the main kind which you can get for Hondas from the manufacturer (at least I've seen them offered ...


2

I live in Texas, so I don't even really know what a block heater is, but I know electronics, and an open circuit means that something is broken (or a switch is open, but I don't think there are any switches in this circuit). Measuring resistance from one side of the cord to the other is only telling you that something between those two test points is "open"....


1

They use a resistor because it is the cheapest and most reliable (reliable as long term maintenance-free) method to produce "startup" heat. Granted, there is some strain onto the alternator and battery, but both are usually upgraded when equipped with an additional heater. The mechanical resistance method would need some kind of friction coupling, subject ...


1

I am not familiar with Nissan's exact block heater, but am going to give you some general maintenance tips to help you attempt to resolve your issue. First thing to do is to ensure the plug and cord and undamaged. These cords are exposed to the elements and often get damaged. If the cord is ok. Check the prongs for corrosion and use a wire brush or Scotch ...


1

I hate to tell you this, but any 12/3 extension cord (15A or better) will do what you need. I see nothing there which you need anything special to get your block heater attached to AC power. I grew up in a cold environment (Northern Rockies in Montana). All our cars had block heaters. We never had anything special beyond the male plug you've shown in the ...


1

If you can follow the power cord back to the heater you should be able to determine what type heater you have. A true block heater will be installed in the block, usually in place of a freeze plug. You may also have a coolant heater which in typically mounted in a radiator hose. The hose is cut, the heater is clamped between the hose ends. You may also have ...


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