18

The sequence matters. If you have a lot of air right after your master cylinder for whatever reason, that air can travel to any point in the system. At some point, the hydraulic line attached to the master cylinder will branch to each of the four wheels. As you pump the brakes, the air will propagate down the hydraulic line, and randomly go down one of the ...


9

There is absolutely no way your car is still driving while being too rusted to lift properly. The car is holding it's own weight when it's on the ground, right? It only needs to hold it's own weight when up in the air, right? Your mechanic just imagines that your bleeder valves are rusted shut (and they might be), so he's using the lift as an excuse. Find ...


9

If your car ramps are high enough, you should be able to. The other option, depending where you live, is to find a mechanic who has a pit. I understand they are illegal in some places, so you may not be able to find one. As a side-note: if your car's frame is really that rusty, you might want to work on it before the floor falls through.


5

Is the car on the floor? Many vehicles, I'm not sure if yours does for certain, feature a brake bias apportioning valve which is essentially a "tap" which opens or closes depending on the position of the rear beam axle. If the car is heavily loaded (i.e. has people in the rear seats and a boot / trunk full of cargo), more braking force is sent to the rear ...


4

Where was the opened line in relation to the bleeding sequence? The Honda Odyssey sequence is Front Left Front Right Rear Right Rear Left So if it was the rear left you opened, just bleed that corner and you're good. If you opened the rear right, bleed that one and the rear left. etc. If the brakes still feel at all spongy after bleeding only one or ...


4

Your procedure for bleeding is fine, except for the banjo bolt You can bleed a line at the banjo bolt but you can't bleed a caliper. You can get your stuck nipple off if you break the head by using a bolt extractor. If you use a bolt extractor and have to drill it out in any way you will NEED to disassemble the caliper to ensure it does not have any metal ...


4

Most likely you just need to pump the brakes several times to get the fluid back into the calipers. More than likely, there is wear on your brake pads, which means when you compressed your caliper, there is now a gap between the pads and the rotor. If you pump the pedal several times the caliper will refill with fluid and take up that space. The more the ...


3

You need to have positive pressure in the brake lines to get rid of any air; the pumping ensures you've built up enough pressure. And if the other sites you've read didn't mention it, you repeat the process (pump, hold, loosen bleeder valve while maintaining pressure on the pedal, close bleeder valve) until a solid stream of brake fluid comes out; that is ...


3

Just thought I'd quickly update you on the situation. Put it simply, it's now fixed. It was indeed the ABS pump, and bought a used one on ebay for 55 dollars and I replaced it at home on my driveway. I've heard I needed to get it re programmed, but, I've drove around for a few days now and it's like new so I'm not going to bother with that. No issues at all. ...


2

If bleeding the brakes as normal isn't working you need a scantool with bi directional controls. And do an automated bleed or have the ABS module pulse the bypass modulator valve. This is required on Chevy trucks when replacing the ABS, the master cylinder or when the master cylinder goes empty.


2

Some cars allow the air bubble to run out naturally, but it is rare, so you'll need an assistant. Basically you need to apply a pressure on a brake pedal, better if you press it a few times so it becomes harder. Then you need to hold a pedal down and undo the nipple using a 7 or 8 mm spanner. Usually 1/2 of a turn is enough. The nipple is located at the top ...


2

The problem is that it is easier to push the fluid out by pressing the brake pedal compared to trying to pull it out with a syringe. Your success may vary and it may be very difficult to operate it. In addition the small volume of the syringe is probably a limiting factor. The cheapest bleeders have a 1 way valve on a pipe. They don't cost anywhere near ...


2

The only problem that I can think of is that the syringe has a fixed volume unless you use something like a check valve.


2

Sounds like an incorrect diagnosis to me. Why would worn-out rear calipers, pads and rotors turn on the ABS light? The failure mode of these components should mean that you notice the problem even before the ABS light turns on. Of course, the final judgement will happen at the Ford dealership, but let's consider how hybrids differ from regular cars. Hybrids ...


2

Bleeding the brakes on the Hyundais & Kias with ESC is a bit different than bleeding them the way we used to back in the day. One of the things you'll need to do it correctly is a Hi-Scan (Pro) tool. Not exactly something you'll have laying around in your toolbox. To properly bleed the brakes, do the following: NOTE: When pressure bleeding, do not ...


2

I doubt the new master cylinder was bled properly. The easiest way I have found, is to put a piece of clear tubing over the closest caliper nipple (usually left front), and extend that over the fender and submerge the other end in the master cylinder reservoir. Be sure to cover the fender to prevent brake fluid from damaging the paint. Crack the nipple. ...


2

Brake pads should be replaced in pairs, that is to make sure you get even braking action. Calipers do not need to be replaced in pairs I would suspect anyone telling you that wants to rip you off. A broken bleed screw is not a reason to replace a caliper unless the remains cannot be removed, even then a reconditioned one would be my solution, and only on the ...


2

Nope, no special concerns - on cars with a mechanical handbrake all the brake witchcraft other than hill hold is controlled electronically so you need to be careful of the wheel speed sensor etc. when you're taking the caliper off (and refitting it!). The hill hold on the manual handbrake cars is the old ball-bearing-in-the-brake line variety I believe so ...


2

Reverse bleeder pumps brake fluid from the caliper bleed screw back to the master cylinder. This type is hard to use because Master Cylinders do not have bleed screws to connect to. Vacuum pump is the opposite, it sucks brake fluid from the Master Cylinder when connected to the brake bleeder on the caliper. Note: some vacuum pumps on the market can create ...


2

Yes you need to pull your master cylinder(MC) and bench bleed it. Air in your brake lines can be removed by a normal bleed of pushing the brake pad and keeping the MC filled above the min line. But once air gets in the MC it cant get out of the MC by that push on the brake pad method. You need to find the workshop manual for your specific car for ...


2

Waste of time. Air can already leak through the thermostat. Thermostats are baffles, not seals. The difference is a seal prevents all flow, a baffle only prevents significant flow. Baffles are used when the same fluid is on both sides and when a small amount of leakage is tolerable.


2

The benefit of positioning the bottle higher, like in picture b, will be that you keep fluid in the pipe near the bleed nipple rather than air, so you are less likely to be able to draw air back into calliper that way.


2

You should keep the bottle BELOW the caliper level, so as not to leave air in the caliper while bleeding. Air in the line itself won't matter too much as it travels to the bottle because of pressure (this is due to surface tension against the sides of the tube). If you have any pressure within the lines, such as back feeding because the bottle is higher, the ...


1

The calipers do not always need to be replaced in pairs. If the shop looked at the calipers they may have determined that the odds of getting the bleeders out is too low. Depending on the shops hourly rate they may have determined that it is more cost effective to just replace the calipers. Sometimes this is a liability decision. If the caliper is overheated ...


1

Here is a test: you can buy 4 locking clamps especially for brake hoses. Clamp all 4 hoses then try the brake pedal. If the pedal still bottoms out, then the problem is not in the 4 wheels. If the pedal is firm then remove one clamp and try the pedal. Refasten each clamp as you check each wheel. It should isolate the problem area. If the rears are drums, ...


1

I think you made a cheap version of a commercial one-person brake bleeding kit like this one: https://www.workshopping.co.uk/product/brake--clutch-bleeder/VS1205/ If you get the joints airtight, and it doesn't contaminate the brake fluid, it should work.


1

Seems reasonable to give it a shot. I would ensure that there is no chemicals left over in the line or jug.


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